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  1. #1

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    Folders on tripod

    They are not very well designed for tripods really are they. After a bit of conversion work in the garage my moskva still flops around a little, not too bad, but certainly not good enough for a windy day. Any clever solutions?
    The problem is the protruding mount on the base of the camera.There is just not enough ` camera' sitting flush on the tripod mount.

  2. #2
    Uncle Goose's Avatar
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    you could use a large thick rubber washer between the camera and the tripod, in that way it would make contact with the body of the camera. You have to check of course how thick exactly it has to be.
    Sure, I could give you a boring explanation who I really am but I rather let the Origami do the talking.

  3. #3

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    Tried rubber, but you got me thinking that what I need is some really firm rubber that will go all the way along the base of the camera, at least as far as the edge of the tripod removable mount.Of course folders are a lot longer than the mount.

  4. #4

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    What about some bicycle inner tube cut to cover the whole base, if its not thick enough to glue on directly glue it first to some card or thin plastic sheet to make it up to the correct thickness? Or you could just use plastic sheet, various thicknesses of black polystyrene can be got from model shops and its easy to cut with a sharp knife.

    Steve

  5. #5
    DWThomas's Avatar
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    You could use a rubber 'O' ring large enough to go around the protruding mount. I have also cut a piece of a waffle-textured closed cell foam exercise mat, sized about equal to the top of the tripod, with a hole to match the protruding mount. Some quick release plates are available with an adjustable angle piece that can be used to reduce rotation between the plate and camera also.

  6. #6

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    aha, got a draw full of bike tubes, the children will not miss a few..:-) good idea, that way i can make a template from the card/plastic.

    Thanks also Dave, the exercise mat idea is a good one, I know exactly what you mean.

  7. #7

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    You could also try using the Arca Swiss-type QR plates and clamp.

    My RedSnapper ball head has a copy of this, so I've got a small handful of different length plates to suit different lenses and cameras (long ones are especially useful with a ball head as you can tweak the camera fore and aft to help the balance).

    In your scenario you could easily adapt a plate specifically for the camera, that way you wouldn't have to fiddle with adding the rubber spacer or glue anything to camera or tripod.
    Matt

  8. #8

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    The issue is also very camera specific. I've had relatively little trouble using either my Bessa Perkeo II or my Certo 6 on tripods, but I had to find a head that used quick release plates that fit the cameras appropriately.

  9. #9

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    You could use one of those older L-shaped flash brackets. Attach the camera to the bracket. Then, attach the bracket to the tripod.

  10. #10
    Kevin Kehler's Avatar
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    I built a base for my camera to sit on while in the tripod - since the tripod holes were located at the front 1/3 or back 1/3 of the camera when unfolded, there was always 2/3 of the camera hanging over one side of the tripod. I took a piece of cherry wood (the camera is cherry and I wanted it to match) and drilled three holes - one for each tripod hole and one for the tripod itself (in between the two camera holes). A trip to the hardware store gave me the correct threaded inserts and some thumbscrews. Now the base sits balanced on the tripod, the camera is screwed into the base via both of it's tripod sockets and the thumbscrews and it is very secure. Looks like part of the camera as well.

    It was a lot easier than bringing a second tripod along and only added about 1lb of weight.
    Once a photographer is convinced that the camera can lie and that, strictly speaking, the vast majority of photographs are "camera lies," inasmuch as they tell only part of a story or tell it in a distorted form, half the battle is won. Once he has conceded that photography is not a "naturalistic" medium of rendition and that striving for "naturalism" in a photograph is futile, he can turn his attention to using a camera to make more effective pictures.

    Andreas Feininger

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