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  1. #11
    Curt's Avatar
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    I have an RB67 Pro and the negative size is a definite plus. That said I bought a Fujifilm GA646zi which produces 16 645 negatives on a roll. I also have two Mamiya 645's. I took the Fujifilm to Italy and carried it everywhere in my shoulder bag. Hand held it's like a 35mm, very ergonomic and functional. It's "normal" view is portrait since the roll loads from left to right.

    It's a perfect format inbetween 35mm and 6x7. I can't see taking the RB and accessories on a trip like I did. If I were to step up it would be one of my 4x5's. The RB has its place no doubt, in the studio and out on location. Traveling and carrying it around though isn't for me.
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

  2. #12
    photo_griz's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the positive comments everyone. A few more thoughts on the RB67. When I decided to move into MF, I really wanted something that was different than an rangefinder. I was specifically looking to shoot with something that had a WLF (versus a viewfinder) to mimic the process I'm learning to enjoy with the field camera. I also find myself attracted to the 4x5 and 6x7 aspect ratios and to a lesser extent 6x6. I am always cropping my 35mm to a more square format. It was also important that I have easy access to all the system pieces and repairs if necessary. I preferred a camera that needed no batteries and had a solid reputation for reliability and longevity. That really narrowed down my search to Mamiya TLR, Mamiya RB/RZ, Bronica, Pentax 67, and Hasselblad. While everyone may have a favorite, all of these camera systems are capable of producing world class professional results. In other words, regardless of the system, the limiting factor is the equipment between my ears. For me, the final decision came down to price. I know that sounds lame, but the whole system with a 50, 90, and 140 lens, two 120 backs, one 120/220 6x8 back, and a polaroid back cost $800.

    Now that I've had it a few months, I've learned a few things. It is capable of taking amazing photos. And not just super sharp, highly saturated velvia slides. It really works well for polaroids. In fact, I have enjoyed shooting with the polaroid back so much, I purchased a Land 250 and sent it to Jason Wolffe to refurbish. But it is also heavy and it is no replacement for large format. In fact, I often find myself thinking "why didn't I just use my Shen Hao for this shot?". Well the reason is I can get my 120 film done cheap and local with excellent results. Getting my 4x5 film developed is a pain in the ass and expensive. But should I be thinking this? I never have that feeling when I'm shooting my F100. Usually I'm thinking "why can't every camera be this awesome!" I guess bottom line is that while I am enjoying the learning and I am making the best photos of my life, I don't know if the RB67 is going to win me over long term. I guess only time will tell, but I do know this - I just ordered a bunch of 4x5 film.
    "Crap, why didn't I take more pictures"
    Me

  3. #13
    polyglot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RobertoMiglioli View Post
    Great shots! Beautiful colors. RB67 was made for use indoors, not outdoors. It is bulky and heavy for handheld use. But lenses are amazingly sharp.
    Ignore the first half of this! A Mamiya 6x7 is made for using wherever you can take it - my RZ took a lap of the globe with me.

  4. #14

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    Yesterday I took my RB67 out into the great outdoors. I used it with a tripod and a few shots hand held. If you cannot do the same thing, you aren't trying very hard.
    Dave

    "She's always out making pictures, She's always out making scenes.
    She's always out the window, When it comes to making Dreams.

    It's all mixed up, It's all mixed up, It's all mixed up."

    From It's All Mixed Up by The Cars

  5. #15
    fmajor's Avatar
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    I chose my RB67 primarily for how modular it is, but equally for the excellent quality, durability and reliability it offers. I love the interchangeable and rotational aspect of the Mamiya RB67 film magazines - i can carry one magazine loaded with color film and another with b&w and be ready for about anything i'm going to photograph. That Mamiya Sekor lenses are superb was my 1st criteria, but the overall photographic experience the RB67 offers combined with the other "boxes" it checks made it a "no-brainer" medium-format camera choice for me.

    I've not tried any slide film (yet), but your (OP) results look very good. It's hard to tell from just seeing the images on a computer monitor, but they certainly look good enough for 16x20 print size without too much loss.

    For me, the additional hassles of sheet film and large-format system requirements simply weren't enough to overtake the benefits of the larger negative real estate.

  6. #16
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    You Aussies

    Quote Originally Posted by polyglot View Post
    Ignore the first half of this! A Mamiya 6x7 is made for using wherever you can take it - my RZ took a lap of the globe with me.
    You Aussies are tough. I was going to take my RZ to Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam, but I wimped out. Americans are trues victims of comfort and can't handle all that weight traveling. My hats off to you! If you give me permission to brag a bit, I did go on a 3 mile hike in Yosemite with my RZ with 2 lenses. With my girl friends's help
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  7. #17
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    You may just have the wrong camera. Any 6x7 camera is big for handheld use - I didn't say impossible, but you're not going to forget you are carrying it. And the RB, with it's revolving back, is sized more like a 7x7 camera would be, by necessity.

    I'd suggest if you like squarish and think the 6x6 might suit that a 6x6 camera is likely to be far more hand holdable and agreeable for that kind of shooting, probably out of proportion to the seeming actual size difference. I've considered getting an RB system myself, but to use instead of my 4x5 to get around the hassles and costs of sheet film. Used like a 4x5 it's capable of almost the same quality, albeit without movements (except for shift lenses which are expensive and still don't have nearly the movements of even my Tech III.) I've never been tempted by it as a handheld camera. I have a 645 Pro and, while it's a great camera, it hasn't supplanted much 35mm as I expected it to because even it is just too darned big and cumbersome much of the time. My Yashicamat 124, OTOH, is a joy to walk around and shoot with, but that gives up the interchangeable lenses and film backs.

    If you really want to make MF fun to shoot handheld and don't want a rangefinder, a Rollei or Yashica or other fixed lens TLR is really sweet, but you will be stuck with one lens and no interchangeable backs though.

  8. #18
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    Not so fast, here's a pic of Herb Ritts holding his RZ. With a prism may I add Click image for larger version. 

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    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  9. #19
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    First roll with RB67 - Do I love this camera?

    I never said it couldn't or shouldn't be done. But I mean to say I understand why one might not enjoy it much. I like shooting hand held with my 645 Pro but not so much the walking around with it. For that I'll take my Yaschicamat any day.

  10. #20
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    I agree. Besides, you probably don't have assistants like Herb Ritts.
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

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