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  1. #1

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    n00b question about 120 roll film...

    So for fun I got a "debonair" from the Film Photography Project (FPP) which uses 120 roll film. Now with the 35mm cartridges I can finish a roll and it's rolled back into the light-tight cartridge until I'm ready to process. What about roll film. What do I do with it between finishing the roll and processing it (or sending it out as I'll probably do with the E100g expired film they included which I don't have the chemistry to process.) Also I assume when I go to put it on the roll to develop the paper back is peeled off? (I have two rolls of B/W which I intend to process myself after I expose them)
    !
    Thanks!

  2. #2
    one90guy's Avatar
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    After frame 12 I roll all film on takeup reel, remove and use the tape on end if it has one or I do carry rubber bands in my bag. Others may have another method, but I have never had a problem. Have fun.
    “In the end, it's not going to matter how many breaths you took,
    but how many moments took your breath away.”
    ― Shing Xiong

  3. #3
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    120 Rolls have a paper backing that continues past the end of the film and wraps around the shot film as you roll it onto the other spool. There's a paper tape attached that will let you keep it in place.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  4. #4
    flatulent1's Avatar
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    When the roll of 120/220 is completely shot and wound on, there is an adhesive end for you to stick down. one90guy adds rubber bands, I have some plastic 120 film cans (purchased from Freestyle), others use M&M Mini containers or somesuch. If I'm not doing the processing myself I take the film cans with me when I leave the film at the lab.
    Fred Latchaw
    Seattle WA


    I am beginning to resent being referred to as 'half-fast'.
    Whatever that's supposed to mean.

  5. #5

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    The Ilford 120 film has a gummed paper strip attached to the end. After the final frame you just keep winding until you hear it unhook from the first spool and then the "tick-tick-tick" of the end of the backing paper rotating in the takeup spool area (most 120 cameras have a tongue which keeps the film tightly wound). Open the back, carefully remove the film, lick the end of the paper strip and wrap it tightly around the film to hold it. Be very careful not to drop it before you get to that stage as if the film unrolls itself you'll expose the lot.

    Try to only lick a small area of the strip - if you can leave the very end loose then it will be easier to rip it off again in the darkroom when you come to process the film, otherwise it's like trying to find the end of the roll of tape in the dark!
    Matt

  6. #6
    adelorenzo's Avatar
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    Don't forget to fold the end of the paper under before you tape it.

  7. #7

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    The roll of 120 comes on it's own spool including a backing paper. In order to load the camera or film back, you need to have a second spool which serves to receive the film from the "new" roll of 120. When the roll of film is finished, you continue to wind the film onto the second spool until the end of the backing paper is wound off of the original spool. Use the adhesive tape to seal the end of the backing paper so that it won't unwind and expose the film to light. Finally, move the empty spool to the "take-up" side of the camera or back and you are ready to load another film.
    Dave

    "She's always out making pictures, She's always out making scenes.
    She's always out the window, When it comes to making Dreams.

    It's all mixed up, It's all mixed up, It's all mixed up."

    From It's All Mixed Up by The Cars

  8. #8

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    n00b question about 120 roll film...

    Hi. You do remove the backing paper before loading into a processing reel. The end of film you reach first is not attached to the paper, but the other end is. There is a piece of adhesive tape there holding the film to the paper. When I reach that part, I gently peel them apart and fold the tape over so that it sticks to the end of the film. I do this to avoid it sticking to something important! I then cut a thin strip of film away so that the tape doesn't end up in the chemicals. The length of film can then be loaded onto the spiral. I tend to pre-soak 120 films in the tank for about a minute to remove the anti-halation dye before adding developer. You get great negatives from 120 size film. It's worth the effort. Alex

  9. #9

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    n00b question about 120 roll film...

    Hi. Remove paper before loading reel. Watch out for strip of tape that holds them together. Gently pull apart, fold over and cut off before loading. A plain water pre-soak removes dye before developing. One minute is usually enough at developer temp. Alex

  10. #10

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    n00b question about 120 roll film...

    Sorry about double post!

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