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  1. #11
    brian steinberger's Avatar
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    I'd stick with the 6x6 and crop down to 6x4.5 only if you feel the need. Not sure if the VF in your Yashica has crop lines or not for 6x4.5 but that helps also. Personally I love the 6x6 format. But I also have a 6x4.5 camera. I don't think I'd like to be stuck in one format or the other but there are many that do. Basically you will find out if you like the square format by shooting your Yashica and studying your results. You may find yourself cropping to 6x4.5 (rectangle), and if you are cropping alot, maybe you prefer a rectangular image better than square and then could maybe pursue a 6x4.5 camera like the Mamiya or even a 6x7 camera.

  2. #12
    flatulent1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dpt2014 View Post
    Why A? I know I love shooting with a TLR. By no means have I outgrown the 124G, but as I understand it, it's an entry-level TLR in this day and age (nothing wrong with that) and is considered many to be built like a "toy." I am in no hurry to get rid of the 124G if I choose route A, but I can keep my eyes open for a good deal on a cord/flex.
    I can't imagine why this makes a difference, it's a great camera. A Holga is a toy.

    Quote Originally Posted by dpt2014 View Post
    Another thing I should mention is I will use either for street photography. My experience with the 124G is that the general public seems intrigued and less threatened by it (I'm sure this goes for any TLR). For anyone with experience, how do people respond to the m645 (or like cameras) being pointed at them? I ask this because I am by no means threatening or creepy, but my experience with DSLRs with street photography has been poor. Maybe it's my approach, maybe it's the camera. All I know is that I've had much more success with the 124G than my 5D2. Wondering if I'll be as successful with something like an m645.
    I have a 645 Pro TL with WLF for street-like shooting, doesn't seem to bother people. The 124G gets pretty much the same non-reaction. An EOS 1V with 24-70 2.8 tends to get wary glances and sometimes open hostility. There's a WLF for the Nikon F4; I sometimes wonder how folks would react to that. By the way, I have never been bent out of shape by the restrictions placed on using a WLF on 645. If I have to crop, I crop.

    You might also consider a Bronica SQAi; not so cheap as a Mamiya kit, but still 6x6.
    Fred Latchaw
    Seattle WA


    I am beginning to resent being referred to as 'half-fast'.
    Whatever that's supposed to mean.

  3. #13

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    Here's my advise.

    If you want a new camera, GET IT! You'll enjoy it and join the rest of us who just like to have and shoot something different. However, if you think new camera will improve your photograph, FORGET IT until you reach a point the reason of getting that new camera is a result of limitation you are experiencing with your old camera.

    Granted, with enough skills, you can do just about anything with just about any camera, sometimes gears made for that purpose will make it easier and possible in more situations. To me, that's when getting new camera makes sense. But then again, since this is our hobby, nothing HAS TO make sense. (right?) Enjoyment is a reason enough for me.

    As to format, it's really a matter of your personal preference.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  4. #14
    MattKing's Avatar
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    I shoot both 6x6 (Mamiya C330 TLR) and two different SLR systems with "rectangular" formats (Mamiya 645 Pro and Mamiya RB67).

    The best reason to consider an SLR is to permit you to do the things you cannot do as easily with a TLR - close-focus work, work that requires precise framing, work that benefits from TTl metering, work that benefits from interchangeable backs, work that benefits from a motor drive, etc.

    You might also prefer the ergonomics of one over the other - that is a good reason to switch.

    Don't discount the importance of being restricted to landscape orientation before you have tried it - it just takes one picture per roll that demands portrait orientation to end up causing you great frustration.

    I don't know whether this applies to the OP, but I have observed that people who tend to view their photographs on a computer monitor tend to use portrait orientation much less frequently than those who prefer to work with prints or project slides.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  5. #15
    Slixtiesix's Avatar
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    If your Yashica is in full working order I would continue shooting with it. A Rolleicord Vb or Rolleiflex T won´t give you much increase in picture quality, if any at all and you probably need to have them overhauled before you can use them. A Rolleiflex with Planar or Xenotar will possibly deliver sharper images but only at full aperture. From F8 onwards there will be hardly any difference visible. I would only upgrade if you are not satisfied with the pictures the Yashica delivers (but mind then, Rolleis will be only marginally better) or if it fails mechanically beyond repair. If you should want to buy a Rollei nonetheless, better bring some patience. It is advisable to wait for one in nice condition or even recently serviced. Otherwise you should plan in another 100-150 usd to have it CLAd, if necessity should arise.

  6. #16

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    Who ever used the word "toy" about a 124G? I thought they were widely acknowledged to be about the best TLRs going that aren't Rolleis. The taking lens should be pretty similar to the Tessar/Xenar on a 'cord or a T. If you can score a Planar/Xenotar Rolleiflex at a good price, by all means go for it, but I don't think you should expect a meaningful optical upgrade from the other models.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  7. #17

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    Excellent recommendations, all. I think I will stick with the 124G and continue thinking about the m645.

    Regarding the "toy" comment about the 124G, it's an opinion I've read on a number of boards. Many posters say that once you've handled a Rolleiflex, anything else (they've mentioned the 124G specifically) feels like a toy. I suppose there exists Rolleiflex "supremacists" and that is where the "toy" reference comes from. Perhaps the word "toy" is a bit harsh. Thought I don't see anyone raving about the build quality of the 124G, whereas Mamiyas (e.g. the C-series) are often described as being built like tanks.

    Personally, I can't say that the 124G feels cheap by any means (then again, I haven't handled a Rolleiflex...heh).
    Last edited by dpt2014; 11-12-2012 at 01:32 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #18

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    Another question...

    I see a lot of posts in this thread recommending that if I'm interested in 6x4.5 that I should just crop down from 6x6. I wonder to myself why that is. The advantage I see is less equipment to acquire.

    That said, I've never been into cropping. I've shot digital for years and and very familiar with the crop tool in Photoshop - takes 2 seconds. Maybe it's just my eyes, but I've never looked through a viewfinder and thought, "I'll frame it like this now and crop it the way I want later." I prefer to "get what I see." Maybe I'm being naive or stubborn, but I shoot 6x6 because I like that aspect ratio. If I want to shoot 6x4.5, I would not feel comfortable shooting 6x6 with the mindset of framing for when I want to crop down to 6x4.5 later. I'm sure this is a self-limitation, but that's just how my mind works.

  9. #19
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dpt2014 View Post
    Another question...

    I see a lot of posts in this thread recommending that if I'm interested in 6x4.5 that I should just crop down from 6x6. I wonder to myself why that is. The advantage I see is less equipment to acquire.

    That said, I've never been into cropping. I've shot digital for years and and very familiar with the crop tool in Photoshop - takes 2 seconds. Maybe it's just my eyes, but I've never looked through a viewfinder and thought, "I'll frame it like this now and crop it the way I want later." I prefer to "get what I see." Maybe I'm being naive or stubborn, but I shoot 6x6 because I like that aspect ratio. If I want to shoot 6x4.5, I would not feel comfortable shooting 6x6 with the mindset of framing for when I want to crop down to 6x4.5 later. I'm sure this is a self-limitation, but that's just how my mind works.
    You may find that the "cropping" issue will engender more discussion then you expect .

    In my mind, the subjects of my photographs are what should determine the "shape" of the final result.

    The aspect ratio offered by the camera is just something that I need to work with in order to waste as little real estate as possible in the resulting negative or slide.

    Of course for slides, it may be more important, because they are often projected (by me).

    It probably helps that I both do my own darkroom work, and cut my own mats.

    By the way, I shot a fair number of weddings where I was mentally cropping every 6x6 shot I took, as I took them, because 4x5 aspect ratio usually works best in most wedding albums.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by dpt2014 View Post
    That said, I've never been into cropping. I've shot digital for years and and very familiar with the crop tool in Photoshop - takes 2 seconds. Maybe it's just my eyes, but I've never looked through a viewfinder and thought, "I'll frame it like this now and crop it the way I want later." I prefer to "get what I see." Maybe I'm being naive or stubborn, but I shoot 6x6 because I like that aspect ratio. If I want to shoot 6x4.5, I would not feel comfortable shooting 6x6 with the mindset of framing for when I want to crop down to 6x4.5 later. I'm sure this is a self-limitation, but that's just how my mind works.
    I have kind of a senseless fetish for keeping the original aspect ratio whenever possible, so I'm sympathetic. I can shoot wide with the intention of cropping later, but it feels wrong to look at a square while planning for a rectangle.

    Personally, I found I didn't like 645 very much. It does of course have the problem that to switch between landscape and portrait you typically have to rotate the camera, which is seriously awkward with a WLF and less than convenient with many MF cameras, but I just found it to be an unappealing compromise between smaller and larger formats---others feel differently, obviously. IMHO, try the format before you commit much money to it.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

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