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  1. #31

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    Option D) forget finding justification..... just get it and enjoy.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  2. #32
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    I have a Yashicamat 124 and a Mamiya 645 Pro, so I have the camera you have (well, almost - your G has gold plated contacts for flash, more black and less chrome, and different internal gears, but they work the same and the lens is the same) and one you're considering.

    The things to ask yourself are what you don't like about the TLR and what you hope to gain from going to 645. From what you say, the TLR is going to suit your style (street shooting with WLF) much better than the 645. The Yashica is much smaller and handier, easier to carry around. The 645 Pro and Pro-TL, but not the earlier 645 and 1000s models, offers mid roll film changes with film backs. All of then offer the option of exposure automation with the AE prism finder and film advance with the winder grip (I have both) and interchangeable lenses. Do you need or really want these things? And do you need or want them badly enough to give up the square format, the quiet operation, and the size and weight of the Yashicamat? I don't personally consider a WLF very viable for a 645 camera because I mix a lot of landscape and portrait shooting, but that's just me. Oh yes - the inserts for the 645 are easier and quicker to load than the Yashicamat and you can carry several pre-loaded making film loading even faster in the field. Combined with the 15 shots per roll this might matter if you tend to shoot a lot.

    I actually enjoy shooting more with the Yashicamat and its simplicity. The Mamiya is far more versatile and much like shooting with an overgrown automated 35mm SLR.
    Last edited by Roger Cole; 11-12-2012 at 08:15 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #33
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Oh yes, I crop if the photo is improved by it, but do tend to compose with the frame at hand if possible. And the Yashicamat is a great little camera, not a toy in any sense. It's not a Rollei, but nothing but a Rollei is. I may get a nice Rollei some day but I'm in no hurry about it. I like my Yashicamat.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by jawarden View Post
    hehe, yes I know there's no accounting for my aversion to the Hassy ker-pow when it shoots. :-) You know what sound I really do like with the hassy though - the wonderful sound it makes when you advance to the next frame. It just has that sound of, I don't know, mechanical goodness. It's pretty sweet.
    yeah... the Yashica Mat sounds like a rock tumbler
    www.EASmithV.com

    "The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera."— Dorothea Lange
    http://www.flickr.com/easmithv/
    RIP Kodachrome

  5. #35

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    If you started to learn photography from digital then I suggest to take a deep breath and start to work in reaaaaally slow pace. What matters are the film and the lens, cameras are just light box. There are no pixel peepers, measurbators, or lcd chimpers. Don't use the digital mindset of 'pricier is better/cheaper is toy' or 'newer is better' because film photography is already matured. And there will be no upgrades in film photography gear since basically you are moving from one dinosaur to another

  6. #36

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    Thanks for the two cents, Roger. It's not that I'm not happy with 6x6 at all. In fact, I'm extremely happy with it. It's not that I'm looking to gain anything from the m645 that I'm missing from the 124G. Rather, I'm just looking to experience something different.

    Some schools of thought may say that I should learn to master 6x6 before moving on, but I don't think I'll ever really master it. I can only hope to ever become proficient in it - I believe that I'll always be a student of photography as there is always something new to learn. That said, I would like to learn about 6x4.5.

  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by MFstooges View Post
    If you started to learn photography from digital then I suggest to take a deep breath and start to work in reaaaaally slow pace. What matters are the film and the lens, cameras are just light box. There are no pixel peepers, measurbators, or lcd chimpers. Don't use the digital mindset of 'pricier is better/cheaper is toy' or 'newer is better' because film photography is already matured. And there will be no upgrades in film photography gear since basically you are moving from one dinosaur to another
    I readily accept that film has a steeper learning curve. But that's a fantastic, and hilarious, point. One dinosaur to another...priceless!

  8. #38

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    On more serious note...

    How large do you intend to print and how important is extreme sharpness and detail? I started with 35mm, went to 645, briefly did 6x6, then went to 6x8. To me, 645 didn't offer the kind of improvement I was hoping to get over 35mm. To me, 645 gear I had, (Mamiya 645Super and Pro) felt more like an over-sized 35mm gear. Going to 6x8 (Mamiya RB) is a whole different experience.

    If you are into experiencing different things and learning, here's another option.

    I did have a Rolleicord V for about a year. It was a fantastic camera but TLR wasn't for me.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  9. #39
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    dpt2014,

    I am also a non-cropper, whatever I shoot, I print full-frame with dirty black border. So I'm not going to suggest you crop. Just want to point out that if you do crop, you never have to rotate the 6x6 camera to go from horizontal to vertical, and you can crop tightly to home in on a subject instead of changing lenses or walking closer. It's a major advantage of the format for the people who crop.

    You might also find that the "signature" of the pictures you get with the Yashica become part of the aesthetic that you can accept as your own. I don't know... Roger Cole maybe you know, does it have a charming "signature" (like a Ricohflex) that betrays it's not a Rolleiflex but is beautiful in its own right?

  10. #40

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    The clarity and resolution of medium format over 35mm aren't really advantages for me (yet). Everyone has been saying how shooting portrait is basically impossible with a WLF on the m645, but the WLF is exactly why I got into MF. It's the experience of shooting with a WLF that I'm after. I really enjoy the perspective shooting from waist level gives me. And that's what photography is all about, to me at least. That is, the experience and joy of shooting.

    Sharpness and detail are important to me to the extent that my photos effectively portray the story or message I'm trying to get across. I'm not a pixel peeper (at least not with film.

    I've considered the m645 vs r(b/z)67. While I am interested in 6x7, it's not something I want to get into yet. I head those bodies are even heavier and more cumbersome than the m645.

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