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  1. #41
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dpt2014 View Post
    I've considered the m645 vs r(b/z)67. While I am interested in 6x7, it's not something I want to get into yet. I head those bodies are even heavier and more cumbersome than the m645.
    Yes, quite a bit bigger and more cumbersome, until you want to shoot using a waist-level finder and portrait orientation, when suddenly they are much less cumbersome then a Mamiya 645.
    Last edited by MattKing; 11-13-2012 at 01:25 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: clarity
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  2. #42

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    Oh, yeah.... RB IS heavy.... (and I really like it) It's surprisingly hand-holdable once I attach an L bracket.

    I've never heard portrait being impossible with WLF. I love taking portraits and I use WLF. I find chasing kids impossible with it but for anything else, it's actually more fun. I think WLF gives me an advantage of being able to see the finish product in a way prism finder can't.

    Anyway, good luck with your search.

    I take a different position about equipment. I LOVE using different equipment. It's part of the fun. So I don't really justify my purchases anymore.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  3. #43

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    Stick with 6x6 or try 645?

    Yes, they are heavier and bulkier....but probably not by as much a you think.
    Also insanely good value right now (having played with one it's probably my next purchase...) and all the versatility you could want.
    Monopod might be a good idea though....

    Honestly I would make a 645 mask and drop it in your viewfinder, go out and shoot a couple of rolls framing with the mask, then crop to 645.
    See if you like it or not.

    I am with you on how sweet a TLR is to use, and I rarely crop, so I think you're more likely to go with continued TLR.
    if you do, get a Rollei, you won't regret it.
    Unless you get a bad one....
    Don't buy of eBay because 90% of the ones on there have issues.
    I got mine from a bloke who bought nearly a dozen over a period from eBay and all had to be at least cleaned and adjusted, Half of them have needed a fl strip and reshimming or broken parts replaced etc.
    But a Rollei in good nick is a jewel....

    Only downsides are
    - only one lens (unless you pony up for a telerollie and a widerollei as well!!! $$$$$$$$$$$$$)
    - no interchangeable backs
    - no meter unless you get a late Flex ($$$)

    Otherwise lovely.

  4. #44
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dpt2014 View Post
    Thanks for the two cents, Roger. It's not that I'm not happy with 6x6 at all. In fact, I'm extremely happy with it. It's not that I'm looking to gain anything from the m645 that I'm missing from the 124G. Rather, I'm just looking to experience something different.

    Some schools of thought may say that I should learn to master 6x6 before moving on, but I don't think I'll ever really master it. I can only hope to ever become proficient in it - I believe that I'll always be a student of photography as there is always something new to learn. That said, I would like to learn about 6x4.5.
    Well if you can afford it and you want to try it, what are you asking us for? Just do it!

    I shoot 35mm, 6x4.5, 6x6, and 4x5 with an occasional shot on 6x7 via a roll film back in my 4x5 camera. I enjoy them all.

  5. #45
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Yes, quite a bit bigger and more cumbersome, until you want to shoot using portrait orientation, when suddenly they are much less cumbersome then a Mamiya 645.
    Howzat? My 645 is quite easy and natural to use for verticals. Granted no revolving back like an RB but it's easy to shoot verticals with the prism finder. I don't even have a WLF and don't see much point in one for a 645. With the prism portrait orientation is at least as easy as it is with any 35mm.

  6. #46
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    Howzat? My 645 is quite easy and natural to use for verticals. Granted no revolving back like an RB but it's easy to shoot verticals with the prism finder. I don't even have a WLF and don't see much point in one for a 645. With the prism portrait orientation is at least as easy as it is with any 35mm.
    Sorry for the lack of clarity - I was referring to using either camera with a waist-level finder. I've since corrected it.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  7. #47
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    Well this little thread certainly took flight fairly quickly... 5 pages in 16 hours! Phew! y'all must be tired! LOL


    I say you do what I have done. Buy whatever formats you can afford. I started with a Nikon FM in August of 2011 because I was familiar with 35mm. After a month or two I bought a Mamiya TLR and tried 6x6. Then I went to a Hasselblad. Last week I purchased a 4x5 to try a little large format. In between all of those I've also picked up a few box cameras like the Certo Phot's, and Kodak Brownies, and also an F100 for a little more modern conveniences.

    I find myself gravitating towards 35mm the most, but I still enjoy shooting the 6x6 format just as much. Maybe I'll enjoy LF more than any of them, and maybe I wont. But I wont know until I try...

    Buy what you can afford, try what you buy, and make a decision once you've made your own experiences.

  8. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Yes, quite a bit bigger and more cumbersome, until you want to shoot using a waist-level finder and portrait orientation, when suddenly they are much less cumbersome then a Mamiya 645.
    My point is that I rarely find my self shooting portrait orientation. Now, maybe this is something I'll learn to appreciate and do eventually, but not for now.

    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    Oh, yeah.... RB IS heavy.... (and I really like it) It's surprisingly hand-holdable once I attach an L bracket.

    I've never heard portrait being impossible with WLF. I love taking portraits and I use WLF. I find chasing kids impossible with it but for anything else, it's actually more fun. I think WLF gives me an advantage of being able to see the finish product in a way prism finder can't.

    Anyway, good luck with your search.

    I take a different position about equipment. I LOVE using different equipment. It's part of the fun. So I don't really justify my purchases anymore.
    Sorry, I think there may be some confusion. We're talking about portrait orientation - not portraits.

  9. #49
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    About cropping - if you're like me and can't see horizontal lines and vertical lines and compose them as straight in the viewfinder, you have to crop. If I printed 90% of my negatives full frame they'd be crooked. So I have to have a very relaxed attitude towards it. But the general idea should be: do what you want with your negs. Cropping isn't exactly a sin. Whatever the picture demands is a good idea.

    Besides, if you shoot 6x6 and crop to 3:4 ratio, you support film sales because you use more film per frame...

    I guess it boils down a little bit to what you're trying to achieve with your photography. If you're interested in using different cameras to make your works of art then you should. If you're only interested in the pictures, and the camera is nothing more than a transmission chamber, then the camera shouldn't matter so much. If you're interested in both, you have to think long and hard about what's most important.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  10. #50
    ROL
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    6x6 is so square, man. Cropping.

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