Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,915   Posts: 1,556,384   Online: 1096
      
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 33
  1. #11
    ic-racer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,283
    Quote Originally Posted by polyglot View Post
    So there isn't 61mm of useful film between the perforations? That kind of ruins the plan.
    Just crop the perforations out. You only want to cut the film on one side anyway. Your aspect ratio may be more like 6x9 or a 35mm frame in the end. Nothing wrong with that.

    If it were me (with my Horseman 6x9 system) I'd take the rool of 70mm and use a fine cut saw to cut the perforations off one end of the roll. How much? Well, you have the spools, just cut it to fit your spools. Then I'd just load it on the spools in the dark. How much film? I'd just fill the spool to the brim and keep them in the dark, like sheet film. The Horseman 220 backs are cheap now, so I'd get maybe 5 of them and just load them in the dark. Loading each back can't be any harder then loading 8 film holders in the dark. No leader paper, just attach the film to the spools in the dark with some tape. Since you are in the dark, as soon as you close the back you are 'good to go,' no need to look for a 'wind-up' mark before closing the back.

    When ready to process, load frame #1 on the reel first and run it to the center and just cut off any excess. No fancy measuring is needed for any of this unless you wind up with frame spacing issues (depending on how your back works). In that case a little trial and error to find out how much 'wind-on' is needed for the start of the roll before closing the back, or build up the take up reels with some tape to the desired starting diameter and just close the back after taping the film on the take-up spool.

    If you are perfectionist and want the lens centered, you can measure how much the perorations extend into the image area, divide that by two and apply that much front rise, on a Horseman (load the perforations to the bottom of the frame). On the RZ load the perforations on the top and you get a little automatic 'front rise' for each image after you crop.
    Last edited by ic-racer; 11-22-2012 at 07:38 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #12
    AgX
    AgX is online now

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,771
    Fiddling around with a saw in the dark is different from drawing film through a splicer...

    And not much mechanical saws have precision guides to move the film spool along.

  3. #13
    ic-racer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,283
    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    Fiddling around with a saw in the dark is different from drawing film through a splicer...

    And not much mechanical saws have precision guides to move the film spool along.
    No "precision guides" just mark the roll, hold it in hand and saw. The margin of error is huge (millimeters) for my Horseman backs. I can do the cut by hand with the night-vision. I just cut a guitar saddle to 1/64" by hand yesterday. I'd use the same saw. I could probably do the cut in the dark by propping the saw up horizontal on a piece of appropriately sized wood.

    Now the 'dust' may spoil the edge of the film, but I'm thinking of something like a 'surplus' or 'free' roll of 70mm that would be otherwise useless. Not something that cost $500

  4. #14
    polyglot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    South Australia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,292
    Images
    12
    Mark the roll, eh? A mark that I should look at, with the lights on? Or that I can't see in the dark with my fingers near a sawblade? Can't say I'm liking either option, and an RZ back is not going to deal well with film that is the wrong width and burrs all down one edge. It also means cutting one end off the metal spool that the film is held on, so there will be little metal burrs spread all through the film, not to mention stress-fogging.

    Far easier to put a razor or two in a little channel/guide and pull the film through it as it's travelling from the large roll to the small. There are a number of film-slitting designs on the web and they're pretty simple; I could make one up to slit the film as it came off the 70mm roll.

  5. #15
    StoneNYC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    7,443
    Images
    225

    220 film dimensions/specification (ISO732)

    Polyglot, just invest in a back, save yourself the hassle. Ive been following the 70mm backs for a while on eBay, the SAME back is constantly re-listed, one was listed at $400 and I sent a private message as said "I've seen you re-list this 4 times, would you accept $100 with shipping?" And got my back for a fraction of the asking price.

    You really only need 2 canisters, 4 if you are going crazy, and they still sell 15 foot Kodak rolls of 70mm for around $30, but it comes with a new canister so you get PRE-loaded film and a canister that's reusable. Not a bad deal.

    I'm still not FULLY convinced about giving up 70mm but I'm getting there, however I spent a lot of time invested in gathering the components so I'm not sure I would sell very cheaply... So don't buy from me! Lol


    ~Stone

    The Noteworthy Ones - Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1 / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  6. #16
    polyglot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    South Australia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,292
    Images
    12
    The problem is not the 70mm back ($160) but the adapter required to mount it on an RZ ($260). Note that I have an RZ, not an RB and not a 'blad.

  7. #17
    StoneNYC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    7,443
    Images
    225

    220 film dimensions/specification (ISO732)

    I have an RZ, my 70mm back came with the adapter plate... so they are out there


    ~Stone

    The Noteworthy Ones - Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1 / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  8. #18
    StoneNYC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    7,443
    Images
    225

    220 film dimensions/specification (ISO732)

    Hmm I looked on eBay, I see what you mean, the plate adapter separate is more (from Europe) than I payed for both.

    However the current RB 70mm backs have the suction cup, mine doesn't so I supposedly can't shoot as accurate in macro (suction cup adds more pressure to the plate to ultra flatten the plane of film) I've thought of buying one and then selling it just for the suction cup haha


    ~Stone

    The Noteworthy Ones - Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1 / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  9. #19
    polyglot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    South Australia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,292
    Images
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    Hmm I looked on eBay, I see what you mean, the plate adapter separate is more (from Europe) than I payed for both.
    Yep.

    There's the possibility of acquiring a roll or three of Plus-X locally so I might just do that and be patient waiting for a back to appear. It's not like I'm going to run out of film next week

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    131
    Noboby seems to have answered the question you asked: the dimensions of a 220 roll. Offhand, I don't know either but if you want to PM me a postal address I'll send you gratis a long expired, unexposed, unrefrigerated roll that you can experiment with. I don't think we can actually buy 220 film here in AU any more and AFAIK Portra is the only emulsion available in 220 anywhere. Good luck with the project. OzJohn

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin