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  1. #1
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
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    Zeiss Ikon Nettar 517/16 35mm Film Adapter

    Is there a such a thing like 35mm Film adapter for above camera ? Is there a way to hack the camera ? 120 Film costs me 3 times to me and postage even increases it. I think 24mm X 60mm is an more attractive solution.

    I think the problem is to protect the shot film from internal camera light.

    Thank you,

    Umut

  2. #2
    flatulent1's Avatar
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    I've never seen one. On the principle that anything can be accomplished if you really try, here is my brief analysis:

    1. Figure out a way to hold a 35mm film cassette centered in the right-hand film well.
    2. Modify a take-up spool to accept the film AND keep it aligned.
    3. Since there's no backing paper, you're left guessing how much film to wind between shots.
    4. You reach the end of the roll... You either attach a rewind crank to the right-hand shaft, or you remove the film in a changing bag.

    There may be more obstacles I haven't thought of, these are the obvious ones. 1 and 2 can be done. 3 and 4, in my opinion, make the whole operation not worthwhile.
    Fred Latchaw
    Seattle WA


    I am beginning to resent being referred to as 'half-fast'.
    Whatever that's supposed to mean.

  3. #3

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    You could make spools out of wood or something, and you could cover the red window, but the trouble would be determining when to stop winding. It's not obvious to me how you could solve this (it's basically the same problem we discussed earlier about using 220).

    I don't know how much light would leak between the film gate and the pressure plate. I think you could fix that with strips of adhesive felt, but it would be inconvenient to remove so that you could shoot 120 again.

    The price difference surprises me. Do you know anyone who travels to the States or western Europe who could bring back a few bricks of film?

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  4. #4

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    I'm guessing you mean the price per frame?

    A roll of Ilford 120 film here is about £3-£4, that gives me either 8 frames on my Zeiss folder or 15 on my Bronica. Or the same outlay on a roll of 35mm film gives me 38 frames in the MX.

    I just tend to keep medium format for the more serious stuff and use 35mm for experiments. If a location works well I'll be back with the Bronica to get higher quality shots.
    Matt

  5. #5
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
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    I made an quick experiment and found , for each spool cavity , one 35 mm cassette fits perfectly. There is only need a 35 mm cassette buttom and up supports and cutting single spool to be placed top of the cassete between winder gear and cassette gear. I am sorry to not make this experiment earlier. Winder turning ratio can be determined by an developed film in these cassettes and place a mark with graphite pencil on to winder knob and the camera.

    No need to worry about light leak because everything protected.

    35mm cassettes are fitting to the cavities perfectly without moving.

    I photograph our garden and close distance subjects plus morning light hit balcony or rainy night traffic and my taste for bw is champagne grade with beer wallet. I think snow would be an good subject for bw but there are two months to this weathers photographs.

    24x60 will be funny.

    Thanks everyone,

    Umut

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mustafa Umut Sarac View Post
    Winder turning ratio can be determined by an developed film in these cassettes and place a mark with graphite pencil on to winder knob and the camera.
    It won't be consistent as you go through the roll, because as you take the film up onto the spool it gets thicker. So if you do your measurements based on how far you need to turn to advance 60mm with the takeup spool empty, your frames will get further and further spaced apart as you go towards the end of the roll. (But at least they won't overlap.)

    35mm cassettes are fitting to the cavities perfectly without moving.
    I would never have guessed this! Are you going to rewind into the original cassette, or unload the takeup cassette and develop from there? I guess either will work.

    24x60 will be funny.
    It's not too far off from 6x14 (which is what people get out of converted Kodak 3A cameras on 120); it seems like it'll be a good panoramic ratio. You should post some photos of the setup; I bet other people would like to do this.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  7. #7
    Ambar's Avatar
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    I've never tried this but it just occurred to me, instead of trying to make a 35mm cassette work in a medium format, why not wind 35mm bulk film onto a 120 spool?
    Get a spool with a used backing from a normal 120 roll. In the dark room, stretch out the backing with the front side (black side) up, maybe use some pins or tape to hold it down. Turn the lights off and stretch film out over it, then tape or staple the film onto the end. Roll up the backing and film onto a spool as taught as you (reasonably) can. Use some tape to hold the roll together.
    I would suggest either taping both ends to the backing or streching the film all the way to both ends. This way when you begin rolling the film onto the take up spool in the camera, the beginning of the film will guide correctly into the spool and not get loose and/or caught somewhere.
    This would solve both the problem of a lack of paper backing for the pressure plate, and it would allow you to count and measure frames just like a normal roll of 120 would!
    Alignment can be done with the paper backing as a reference as well.
    Best Luck!

  8. #8
    flatulent1's Avatar
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    Brilliant!
    Fred Latchaw
    Seattle WA


    I am beginning to resent being referred to as 'half-fast'.
    Whatever that's supposed to mean.



 

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