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  1. #1

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    Rolleiflex 3.5F .. film starting point?

    Hey guys,

    I was wondering if anyone knew where the starting point is on the 3.5/2.8F series camera is? Normally there is a red dot to line up the arrow on the film. however this camera doesn't. The owners manual doesn't give any details on this.

    ToddB

  2. #2
    Slixtiesix's Avatar
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    It´s automatic. After you have put the end of the paper into the take-up spool, just wind a bit to make sure transport is working right, then close the back. The camera will sense the beginning of the film automatically.

  3. #3
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    Isn't this an Automat series camera?

    Automats don't have a start mark. There's a small silver roller near to the bottom film compartment. The film leader goes UNDER that bar then over the film gate and on to the takeup spool.

    Turn the film advance lever about a half a turn to be sure that the film is taking up smoothly as it should then close the back and lock it.

    That little roller you put the film under will detect the presence of the film as you roll the advance lever. Film counting will start automatically.

    The whole mechanism resets itself when you open the camera back again to replace the film.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

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  4. #4

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    Thanks guys.. Oh.. one other thing. Is it normal operation to push the shutter release to take up start tab to get it going?

    Todd

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by ToddB View Post
    Thanks guys.. Oh.. one other thing. Is it normal operation to push the shutter release to take up start tab to get it going?

    Todd
    Not sure what you mean by this. Do you mean that you can't wind the film to frame 1 without having pushed the shutter release? If so, no, that is not normal operation. That would indicate you've got an issue with the wind release mechanism.

  6. #6

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    When there is no film.. the crank spins freely, thinking that normal. It's only when I load film and advance to "start" you have to push shutter release to have start on take up spool. What do you think?

    Todd
    Last edited by ToddB; 11-23-2012 at 02:37 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #7
    tony lockerbie's Avatar
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    Maybe if the shutter is already cocked you may have the fire it first.BTW, you must pass the film under the first roller on the 3.5F to make the automatic feature work. So, load your film into the empty chamber, pull the leader under the roller, attach to the take up spool and just advance enough to check that it firmly attached...close the back and keep advancing (you will feel a slight resistance) until the camera locks at frame 1.
    Enjoy the Rollei, a very fine camera!

  8. #8
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

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    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  9. #9

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    Thanks for vid... Look likes did a little something when he attaching on take up spool 1:52.Maybe pushed shutter release? then he shut the door. Look like my camera is OK.
    Todd

  10. #10
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    It should not matter whether the shutter is cocked or not.

    When you finish a roll of film, the counting mechanism stops counting. The crank turns freely so you can be sure the film is completely wound up on the takeup spool. During this time you can click the shutter and cock it again with the crank but it doesn't mean anything. It's just the gears turning. The film counter is done working.

    When you open the back of the camera to change the film then put the leader of a new roll of film under the silver bar, the mechanism is ready to start. You can still turn the crank and click the shutter. (In fact, you need to be able to turn the crank in order to load the film.)

    When you close the back of the camera and lock it shut, the film sensing cam goes down and the frame counter resets. Turning the crank advances the leader which brings the film along for the ride. When the head of the film hits that cam it gets pushed up and this engages the film counting mechanism. When the film is finally cranked into start position with the first frame in the gate, the crank locks and you are ready to take your first picture.

    It should take about 4 or 4-1/2 turns of the crank in order to advance the film to frame 1. After you have turned the crank approximately three turns, you should feel a bit of resistance when the head of the film hits the sensing cam. You should hear a little click as the film trips the cam. It should be only one more turn of the crank to get to frame one.

    During the loading process, cocking the shutter is merely incidental to turning the crank. It shouldn't matter one way or another, however, you should only be able to press the shutter button when the crank is in approximately the one o'clock position. The rest of the time it should be locked.

    Considering that this type of camera was first made 1939, before WW-II, it is a pretty amazing piece of technology. It's like a Swiss watch inside.

    Take a picture, turn the crank and repeat until the film runs out. The counter stops counting, the crank turns freely and you are ready to begin again.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

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    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

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