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Thread: Cokin vs. Lee

  1. #1

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    Cokin vs. Lee

    Hi all,

    my first post here.

    I own a Bronica SQ-Ai with 40 and 80 lenses. The 95mm thread size of the 40mm makes the use of threaded filters unpractical ($$$$).

    I was searching for a square filter system such as the Cokin type. I found another manufature Lee which also seels square filters at a much higher price.

    What is the difference from the Cokin to the Lee filters?

    Thanks.

    João

  2. #2

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    I feel your pain. My Carl Zeiss Jena lenses use 86mm filters.
    You will find that filters do come up on ebay. I bought mine for about 25EUR each, on various auctions (UV, Linear Polariser, Red, YG and green).
    On the original question... no idea. Lee makes glass filters (at least some models) - Cokin made plastic ones. (and I'm not sure if they emerged from the bankrupcy/buyout/whatever happened to them recently).

  3. #3
    wildbill's Avatar
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    sometimes you get what you pay for. go with the lee and don't look back.
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix

  4. #4

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    I've had both Cokin and Lee. I prefer the Lee filter holder (Foundation Kit) as well as filters. Their filters are more expensive, but the color cast is less significant.

  5. #5
    Toffle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildbill View Post
    sometimes you get what you pay for. go with the lee and don't look back.
    Agreed... Sadly I had to pass on a LARGE set of Lee filters and accessories that were on consignment at my local camera shot. The price for the filters alone was high enough, but then the added cost of lawyers for the ensuing divorce would have taken all the enjoyment out of using them.
    Tom, on Point Pelee, Canada

    Ansel Adams had the Zone System... I'm working on the points system. First I points it here, and then I points it there...

    http://tom-overton-images.weebly.com


  6. #6
    EASmithV's Avatar
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    wait, you own 80 lenses?!?! sell some of those lenses and buy filters with those
    www.EASmithV.com

    "The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera."— Dorothea Lange
    http://www.flickr.com/easmithv/
    RIP Kodachrome

  7. #7
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    While some will wince, I go a cheaper filter route with a gelatin filter holder for the Cokin line. So far I just use it with the A size holders. Larger holders, if you can fine the gelatine frame should work just the same.

    Rosco (USA vendor) sells a very broad line of gels for theatrical (usually a two or three digit designation) and cinematography uses (usually a four digit designation).
    The normal smallest sheets are about $6 for a piece about 24x30". Lee (UK vendor) also sells the same sort of stuff, with a differing naming scheme. There are also other vendors - GAM is one that comes to mind, and having some unique products.

    The real deal though is a thing called a designer swatch book. Rosco's has over 100 filters in about a 3"x5" size, with a card behind each one showing the transmision curve.
    I think I got mine for $20. B&H sells them, as well as individual sheets. I clip out the pieces to the reuired dimensions and mount them in the gelatin holder clips I have when I want to take them to the field.

    I know they are not the finest optical quality. They are good enough for the bulk of my projects, where I cannot locate a 3x3 Wratteen filter from the accrued stash of them to suit the desired effect.
    my real name, imagine that.

  8. #8
    southmine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iulian View Post
    Lee makes glass filters (at least some models)
    To my knowledge, most of Lees higher end filters are resin.
    I haven't used the Cokins but I can recommend the Lees (yes they are expensive).
    I don't know if this video *link here* has been linked to here before.
    It's basically a guided tour of the Lee manufacturing facility, and I found it facinating.
    I would never have imagined it to be so hands on and labour intensive.

  9. #9
    narsuitus's Avatar
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    The plastic and gelatin filters that I use in my Cokin filter holder meet most of my needs. However, if I needed high quality graduated neutral density filters because landscape photography was my passion, I would get a Lee filter.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/11336821@N00/5398208369/
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Photo 071429 sml.JPG  

  10. #10

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    Take a look at the Hitech filters. They are supposed to offer good performance for the price.

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