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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Noble View Post
    You have to read the labels.
    ??
    Which labels? the time axis?

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by jsimoespedro View Post
    ??
    Which labels? the time axis?

  3. #23
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Ironically the vibration on a tripod is worse at speeds you'd think would be OK. By half a second it's becoming less important, it's the 1125. 1/60, 1/20, 1/15 which can be affected quite significantly.

    The graph above is one instance, the frequency, mangnitude etc will vary depending on the camera, tripod etc. You need to test your own eqipment and see what works best, but as cameras age some may get worse.

    I've seen very significant differences using the mirror lock on my Mamiya 645, and I know people with Bronicas, Hasselblads and Penta 67's with similar experiences, all when using good professional tripods.

    Handheld is another thing, I've been happy shooting my M3 Leica at 1/30th great results more consistenly sharp than when I used SLR's, I prefer a TLR for handheld MF work when possible althopugh I do still use my Mamiya 645's as low as 1/30 with good results.

    Ian

  4. #24
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    My wooden Berlebach tripod seems to drain vibration very effectively. In 16x20" prints I can't really tell a difference between frames with mirror lockup and those without.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    Ironically the vibration on a tripod is worse at speeds you'd think would be OK. By half a second it's becoming less important, it's the 1125. 1/60, 1/20, 1/15 which can be affected quite significantly.

    The graph above is one instance, the frequency, mangnitude etc will vary depending on the camera, tripod etc. You need to test your own eqipment and see what works best, but as cameras age some may get worse.

    I've seen very significant differences using the mirror lock on my Mamiya 645, and I know people with Bronicas, Hasselblads and Penta 67's with similar experiences, all when using good professional tripods.

    Handheld is another thing, I've been happy shooting my M3 Leica at 1/30th great results more consistenly sharp than when I used SLR's, I prefer a TLR for handheld MF work when possible althopugh I do still use my Mamiya 645's as low as 1/30 with good results.

    Ian
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  5. #25
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    1/60 for me using Pentax 67 hand held. MF cameras do have very large mirrors, that's true. Some photographers specify the reciprocal of the lens focal length e.g. 90mm = 1/90 (1/125) handheld.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  6. #26
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    My wooden Berlebach tripod seems to drain vibration very effectively. In 16x20" prints I can't really tell a difference between frames with mirror lockup and those without.
    I've heard others say that about wooden tripods, I do have two but the first a Gandolfi is awful in terms of build quality and the second is a pro-TV/35mm cine camera tripod built like a tank and very heavy.

    This is why I think it's about knowing your own equipment. These days it's rare I use 35mm or 120 SLR's although I've bought 2 pre WWII quarter plate and two 6x9 SLR's recently but they seem to have very little mirror slap compared to later cameras, strangely. The mirror moves as you press the shutter and isn't governed mechanically, the shutter only tripping once it's up, so you move the mirror mechanically and there's no slap.

    With all equipment there's no hard and fast rules, it's up to us as photographers to find what works best as individuals.

    Ian

  7. #27
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    I've heard others say that about wooden tripods, I do have two but the first a Gandolfi is awful in terms of build quality and the second is a pro-TV/35mm cine camera tripod built like a tank and very heavy.

    This is why I think it's about knowing your own equipment. These days it's rare I use 35mm or 120 SLR's although I've bought 2 pre WWII quarter plate and two 6x9 SLR's recently but they seem to have very little mirror slap compared to later cameras, strangely. The mirror moves as you press the shutter and isn't governed mechanically, the shutter only tripping once it's up, so you move the mirror mechanically and there's no slap.

    With all equipment there's no hard and fast rules, it's up to us as photographers to find what works best as individuals.

    Ian
    Absolutely agreed about knowing our equipment, Ian. The Berlebach is a wonderful tripod, unless you have to travel. It's got quite long legs and won't fit in any suitcase. But it's comparatively light and built very well. 35mm tripod mounted shots with my Pentax SLRs (which don't have mirror lock-up), show really amazing clarity in large prints, regardless of shutter speeds being 1/60s or 2 minutes.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    My wooden Berlebach tripod seems to drain vibration very effectively. In 16x20" prints I can't really tell a difference between frames with mirror lockup and those without.
    Damping vibration is one of the virtues of wood tripods.

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by jsimoespedro View Post
    Thanks for the replies. So to summarize:

    1) If on a tripod, always use mirror lock-up.
    2) If not on a tripod, forget it. Holding the camera steady is more important.
    If not on a tripod, it's pretty hard to take a photo with the mirror locked up.

  10. #30
    Hatchetman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    If not on a tripod, it's pretty hard to take a photo with the mirror locked up.
    Not really. I do this all the time with my Pentax 6x7.

    Just frame the shot, trip the MLU and hit the shutter.

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