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Thread: Rolleifix ?

  1. #31
    BAB
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    Please forgive me for being the odd man out, or Devil's advocate, or Old Crank if you prefer , but the only way I can see the Rolleifix preventing stress on the back plate is if a photographer tries to over-tighten the mounting screw on a tripod which has a platform upon which the Rollei would sit with it's little nubbed feet. Over tightening the tripod screw could, indeed, bend the bottom of the back plate away from the camera body. From an engineering standpoint, the Rolleifix would need another solid connection to the camera body around the bend on the back of the backplate. Since there is no such support or connection, I feel the Rolleifix is more of a quick-release plate than a backplate savor, although I can see that it would help prevent some force being applied to the bottom of the backplate if the camera were struck from the side when on a tripod. Too, the Rolleifix plate would have no effect on the backplate when the camera is opened for film changing, when -- I very strongly suspect -- most of the back plate ending occurs. The Rolleifix also seems a great implement for destroying the finish on your Rollei.

    I've mounted my Rollei on a ballhead for years without damaging anything, and an Arca-Swiss plate is no different from a screw-in ballhead.

    Kindly feel free to correct me if my logic seems ass-backwords.


    Quote Originally Posted by eddie View Post
    The Rolleifix is more than just a quick release plate. The Rolleiflex backs bend easily, and the Rolleifix protects the back from stress.

  2. #32
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    I think you're correct. It was mostly from over-tightening the tripod screw. The 'fix gives a "beefier" platform for the tripod screw, while not allowing the base to flex (no pun intended). Many years ago, I used to help a guy who repaired cameras, and bought/sold at camera shows. Whenever a Rolleiflex was offered to him, the first thing he would do was check the back. He could always tell which ones were used with the 'fix, and which weren't.

  3. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by eddie View Post
    It was mostly from over-tightening the tripod screw.
    ... and when the camera is carried on a pod over the shoulder.

  4. #34
    BAB
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post
    ... and when the camera is carried on a pod over the shoulder.

  5. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by BAB View Post
    From an engineering standpoint, the Rolleifix would need another solid connection to the camera body around the bend on the back of the backplate. Since there is no such support or connection....

    I've mounted my Rollei on a ballhead for years without damaging anything, and an Arca-Swiss plate is no different from a screw-in ballhead.

    Kindly feel free to correct me if my logic seems ass-backwords.

    I won't quibble with your logic or engineering. I'll simply report my limited experience with a Rolleifix: The connection to the camera is very strong and secure. Although it seems flimsy in concept, the part is solid cast metal. And although those little pointers on the front of the main casting might appear to offer little connection, in reality those two points on the front are very solid. The Rolleifix slides into the slot on the bottom plate and pulls itself tight to that plate and to the front points. The three points eliminate side-to-side torque. The solidity of the casting, the way it pulls the back's bottom plate to itself, and the solidity of the two front connections eliminates front-to-back torque.

    In other words, it actually does work.

    Rollei had an advantage over most manufacturers of TLR: they made hundreds of thousands over years, and they had some of the best machining and engineering traditions and skills the world has ever seen to draw from. Making so many body castings and so many backs and bottom plates, they could afford to spend the time to make something like the Rollefix actually work and expect to earn back that investment. I know, a very alien concept in today's rapid turnover rapid change design world....

    Of course none of this negates your experience of using your Rolleiflex without a Rolleifix for years without any problems. I've used a variety of TLRs on tripods over the years without problems, many with backs much weaker than the Rolleiflex. I could see where the Rolleifix would be nice if you don't have the mindset or time to treat the camera right.
    Last edited by Dan Daniel; 12-25-2012 at 07:33 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #36

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    Well stated, Dan. I concur.

  7. #37
    BAB
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    I'll keep that in mind, Dan. Thanks for the advice.

    And thanks for the touch of humor, Brian, re my tripod comment.

    BAB

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