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  1. #21

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    Thanks for all the advice! In reference to the Feisol recommendations, it appears to me that they are nearly as expensive as Gitzo (none come with the center leveling section, so the basic price you see is not really all that accurate once you add in a center piece and head).

    Can anyone speak on load capacity and it's relevance to a hasselblad with a 150mm lens. Would the Monfrotto 190CXPRO (11lb load capacity) be adequate for a hassy?

    Thanks for all the helpful advice!


    I'm still wrestling through my options.

  2. #22

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    I have both a 055 and 190 tripod and have not noticed any problems using the 190 with the Hasselblad and 150mm lens. Never conducted any sharpness test however. I use the 055 for LF and Mf and the 190 for MF and 135/dslr.

  3. #23

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    something to keep in mind -- carbon fiber is delicate -- it is very strong and very light but any damage -- a dent? tiny crack? -- destroys its inherent structure and you could be looking at failure. This gives it a lifespan of distressingly short duration, given the cost.

    metal stays strong. You dent it, ding it, it keeps on going. bend it, you bend it back.

    bicycle frames made of carbon are very light and very costly, but steel has more flexibility and inherent strength.

    Tripods get tossed around a lot -- mine rattles around the back of my car.

    i have a bogen with a grip head that is amazing. Added weight also gives added stability to the whole platform. that's why good tripods have a little hook from which to hang a sandbag.

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by mporter012 View Post
    Can anyone speak on load capacity and it's relevance to a hasselblad with a 150mm lens. Would the Monfrotto 190CXPRO (11lb load capacity) be adequate for a hassy?
    Weigh your gear... its not nearly that heavy.

    The 190 series works well with Hassy and a 150.

  5. #25

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    Dec 2012
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    Manfrotto Alum 055 for around the house, studio.
    Gitzo CF for the hiking. 1 series not strong enough, too much wobble. 2 series rather lovely, stability refound.
    The real issue is the head, tho!

  6. #26
    Slixtiesix's Avatar
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    I have made the experience that one should not tighten the Gitzo G-locks too much. You will ruin them that way with time. I don´t know about the older models but with the new G-locks, the legs are locked properly even if they are tighten gently with just two fingers. I think a 3 series Gitzo will be best for a Hasselblad though a 2 series will suffice. I used a 2 Series CF even with SL66 and 250mm Sonnar and it worked. Concerning the head: do you want a ball head or 3-way?

  7. #27
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    My three-way head for the smaller tripod is a Manfrotto 460 MG. It doesn't have the levers but more comfortable rubber knobs. I don't know whether that would be enough for medium format but in my experience is OK for the small format. I bought it second-hand on an auction site and I am very glad I did.

    I mount it on some Slik legs which I bought in 1989 for birdwatching, therefore it had a two-way head with one lever, good for telescopes but not good for photography.

    I long pondered whether to substitute the legs but, as said, the biggest concern was the cost of theft/forgetting/damage in the trunk of the car etc.

    Don't analyse too much. A tripod always has its use. If you buy some cheaper legs and you find out that they are not good enough for the Hasselblad, you will still have some cheap legs for situations when you don't have an Hasselblad but you need cheap legs. Think airports for instance.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  8. #28

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    I can only offer this advice: if you think that weight doesn't matter and you decide to go for a heavier tripod because it's cheaper, you will regret it.
    And the sign said, "long haired freaky people need not apply"

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by mporter012 View Post
    So, I am having a rather severe case of what I understand to be analysis paralysis: the inability to make a decision over a product purchase! After a few posts on APUG and other webpages, and talking to my local camera shop, I am unsure of what to buy. Here is a bit of a recap: I use a Nikon FE2 and will be using asap a Hasselblad 500cm with lenses up to 150mm. I shoot fine art landscapes in inclement weather (snow, wind, rain).

    Carbon Fiber: I was original hesitant to go with carbon, but many have suggested that it is better to simply buy carbon now, b/c eventually you will want it anyway, so you might as well just buy now. The Gitzo Mountaineering, Induro 8x CT214, and Manfrotto 055cxpro carbon, have come up most frequently. I can't imagine a significant difference between any one of these. The Gitzo I've held - it's very nice. Both the Induro and the Manfrotto have rave reviews on B&H.

    Aluminum: After having decided on Carbon, I began to freak about spending $600+ when I could possibly buy aluminum legs and a great ball head for 1/2 the price. Of course, weight doubles, but unless I am missing something, I can't seem to see any other real advantage to carbon over aluminum other than weight. Many have suggested Tiltall and others have suggested that the Manfrotto 055 is great (800 plus very convincing reviews on B&H), sturdy tripod. Of course, Gitzo also makes aluminum.

    Heads: I've not even begun to research these!

    So this will be my final post on tripod legs. I'd welcome any advice on helping me make a decision based upon the above info. The decision is resting upon just spending the money upfront now for carbon, or going with aluminum to save $.

    Thanks!
    Spend a hundred bucks (or less) on a good used Marchioni Tiltall or Leitz Tiltall. Aluminium, around six pounds, will handle any medium format camera (and most 4x5 cameras) you put on it. $600 for a (fairly fragile) CF tripod is ludicrous, save the extra $500 for film or another lens.
    If you decide the Tiltall is not for you, you'll be able to sell it on and get your money back with no trouble.

    http://tiltalltripod.com/Aboutus.html

  10. #30

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    I know a lot of people like CF, I have aluminum and never had a problem with it. Just get a good tripod and it will be worth its weight in gold.

    Jeff

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