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  1. #21

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    I still don't get this. Are you talking about only the Seagull with interlocking speed and aperture controls. Or any Compur, even those with independent speed and aperture. On my various Compur shutters I've never had any problems changing aperture after cocking the shutter. None of them have coupled speed and aperture.

    Quote Originally Posted by AaTen View Post
    Yeah never adjust exposure and aperture after cocking a compur.

  2. #22
    AgX
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    The issue is that at least at some shutter types by setting the faster speeds an additional spring is engaged when cocking the shutter.
    If the shutter is cocked at lower speeds and then one turns the dial to faster speeds a resistance is felt. Think of moving a device under a bent spring versus tensioning the spring against it. It seems relative. It depends on the construction of the shutter whether this could be harmful.

    There is a special thread here at Apug on this matter.


    With that Seagull 203 shutter you feel a resistance when trying to set the cocked shutter from 1/60 to 1/125.

  3. #23

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    On a non-interlocking shutter changing aperture would not change shutter speed. I agree that it's not good to change speed on some older shutters once they are cocked. I would say that on a Compur shutter with independent speed and aperture controls you can change the aperture after the shutter is cocked with no problems. Is that not true?

  4. #24
    AgX
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    Setting the aperture as such is of no influence to the shutter of this camera.

    Both, aperture and shutter, can be adjusted seperately, though they are EV-linked by means of an adjustable, springloaded lever. It is the aperture that follows the shutter. When using the EV-linkage one thus has to grasp for the shutter dial anyway. And as the linkage is very weak one has to press on that lever in order not to lose the linkage. (Another shortcoming of this camera.)

    But AaTen is is right in that sense, that when you do as just described, and the shutter is already cocked, you could by means of trying to adjust the aperture get the shutter in that setting he described as harmful.

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