Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,699   Posts: 1,549,148   Online: 1095
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 17 of 17
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Vienna, AUSTRIA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    66
    Oh I think it has to do with gearheadism..."I want the lens with the best bokeh!" instead of formulating a photographic vision and aquiring the tools needed to fulfill it

    1. define the mission
    2. get the tools needed

    it is vital to do it in that order, if you want to get to results

  2. #12
    Slixtiesix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    735
    Images
    21
    As Kanzlr said, hard to compare. You should better compare a Kaleinar 150/2,8 to the Zenzanon lens or a Zenzanon 80/2,8 to the Biotar, otherwise it will pretty much be a 80mm vs 150mm bokeh comparison, less to the say that the 80mm are Planar-types while the 150mm lenses (I assume) are Sonnar-types.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    63
    OK, you are right. Different lenses - hard to compare.

    What do you mean about Zenzanon 150/3,5 MC and Biometar 80/2,8 MC for portrait work? I tend to Zenzanon for this work.

  4. #14
    Slixtiesix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    735
    Images
    21
    I don´t know the particular Bronica lens, but for medium format portraits (head and shoulder or facial) I would recommend a 150mm over an 80mm. The 80mm is better suited for full length body shots. Tight facial portraits done with an 80mm will in most cases look distorted. It may still be okay for head and shoulder shots though.
    In any case, and I say that as a great fan of Zeiss lenses, I would prefer a portrait made with a Zenzanon lens that has ideal proportions over any distorted portrait made with a Zeiss lens of too short a focal length for the purpose.

    Regarding the bokeh of the East German mf lenses (especially Biometar 80 and 120, Sonnar 180) I must say that these are sublime. The only lenses that are close are the 2000-Series Hasselblad lenses (110/2, 150/2,8), but these are much more expensive than the East German lenses. I had a look on pictures made with the mentioned Bronica lens on Flickr and they look nice too!

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    63
    Thank you.

    Yes, I don`t want to use this lens for close up portraits, minimal focusing distance (1,5 m) is too far for this work.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    277
    Quote Originally Posted by transporti686 View Post
    Thank you.

    Yes, I don`t want to use this lens for close up portraits, minimal focusing distance (1,5 m) is too far for this work.
    Extension tubes.

    transporti686, as others have noted it would be a lot more helpful to know what exactly it is you intend to do with the lens instead of everyone just guessing. Someone already pointed out the error of comparing an 80mm lens of any type to a 150mm lens. But the other thing is you are discussing two different lenses for two entirely different systems. A better course of action is to figure out your needs and then pick the system that best fits your needs. No system is going to be the best at everything. You may pick what you think is the system with the lens that has the best bokeh but it may be a pain in the butt in other areas. I find getting a camera, lens, and film that you will actually shoot, comfortably, is a better strategy. You will shoot more and have more keepers.

    Anyway maybe the Bronica 150 3.5 MC is a sleeper hit. I own a Bronica and the 150mm PE is the lens everyone seems to clamor for in that line. I got a 150mm 4.0 MC years ago. It's not supposed to be that good. I never upgraded it to the 3.5 MC nor the PE version because I switched over to the Rollei 6008 Integral system. I have never done a head to head test between my 150mm 4.0 MC and my Rollei 150mm 4.0 Sonnar. The Sonnar has built in automatic metering, apertures, and shutter speeds. It's just a faster easier camera/lens to work with.

    So tell the forum what exactly it is you want to do and I'm sure someone can point you in the right direction.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    428
    Quote Originally Posted by kanzlr View Post
    Oh I think it has to do with gearheadism..."I want the lens with the best bokeh!" instead of formulating a photographic vision and aquiring the tools needed to fulfill it

    1. define the mission
    2. get the tools needed

    it is vital to do it in that order, if you want to get to results

    Word!

    In addition:

    2.1 check the current toolbox if there's anything that can be used to achieve the mission by modifying the mission a few percents.


    http://street-photos.net/ | http://felinik.com/ | http://www.facebook.com/jf.felinik

    "The one with the most stuff when he dies wins"

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin