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  1. #11

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    I think a clearing time of only 90 sec is not realistic for all types of emulsions, I think Deltas and TMax need more time. The normal fixing time is two times of the clearing time for normal emulsions and three times for Delta and TMax with structure cristals.
    You take a small piece of film from the end looking out of the cartridge (for 35 mm) and place one drop of fixer on the emulsion. Then wait until it gets nearly transparent. Then dip the film into a small glass with fixer and agitate it a little bit. Take the time until you cannot see a difference beween the first clear spot and the rest of the film any longer. Place a white piece of paper with text under the glass so you can see better the transparency. With this method you can check the exhaustion of you fixer and the time for an unknown film.

  2. #12
    ath
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    The clearing time varies quite a bit with fixer type (brand), dilution and temperature. I always determine the clearing time before fixing and fix thrice as long. With 120 you might have to sacrifice a roll for this.
    Regards,
    Andreas

  3. #13

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    Yes, pink/purple cast almost always indicates under-fixing or exhaustion of your fixer. I've always heard that longer fixing and washing times are required with T-Grain films in order to clear special dyes added to the film base.

  4. #14

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    I notice it takes longer to fix T-max films.

    Jeff

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by amac212 View Post
    Yes, pink/purple cast almost always indicates under-fixing or exhaustion of your fixer. I've always heard that longer fixing and washing times are required with T-Grain films in order to clear special dyes added to the film base.
    Although fixing of tabular grain films may take slightly longer, this has nothing to do with clearing of the dyes. The only way to effectively clear the dyes is to wash the film thoroughly in water before or after fixing. There are two approaches. One is to presoak the film in water for 5 min. That is quite effective in removing the larger part of the dye. The other is to clear it post-development and fixing. If you are using one-shot developer, then no problem. But if you re-use developer, especially with replenishment, your developing solution is going to accumulate more and more dye. In that case a pre-soak is recommended. I also dislike dye carry-over into the stop bath, as it masks the indicator and since it is re-used, will also accumulate. My own process is to develop with single-shot, then to do a double rinse after development, and then to fix after that. I do not get carry-over of dye into the fixer. Most of the dye gets thrown out with the developer, and a little bit clears during rinsing. If any remains, it gets cleared in final washing. Dye is not an issue for darkroom printing, but it is very annoying for scanning.

    The Film Developing Cookbook further clarifies the above. It recommends three 5 min soaks in water to remove the dye, if I recall correctly.
    Last edited by dorff; 01-25-2013 at 06:32 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #16
    ath
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    Quote Originally Posted by dorff View Post
    The only way to effectively clear the dyes is to wash the film thoroughly in water[...]
    That's my experience as well. Fixing longer because of the dyes means you effectively start to wash them out in the fix instead of water.
    Regards,
    Andreas

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by dorff View Post
    There are two approaches. One is to pre-soak the film in water for 5 min.
    I actually do a pre-wash of my films, roll and sheet, however; it's not for 5 minutes. Wasn't sure how that would affect the film. I develop my roll/sheet in a patterson tank. I do a pre-wash on each which is fill, and swhoosh around, and dump 3 times, then I'm ready to put in my developer.. I'll try to extend my pre-wash longer on my roll film now, and see if that helps.
    Go to the light......

    www.keepsakephotography.us

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by ath View Post
    That's my experience as well. Fixing longer because of the dyes means you effectively start to wash them out in the fix instead of water.
    Exactly. Prolonged fixing degrades the image, too. Every reputable resource advises against fixing longer for the sake of removing dye. I prefer the fixer to be clear, so that I can see whether the film has cleared properly or not.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pfiltz View Post
    I actually do a pre-wash of my films, roll and sheet, however; it's not for 5 minutes. Wasn't sure how that would affect the film. I develop my roll/sheet in a patterson tank. I do a pre-wash on each which is fill, and swhoosh around, and dump 3 times, then I'm ready to put in my developer.. I'll try to extend my pre-wash longer on my roll film now, and see if that helps.
    In my experience, TMax takes more than just a rinse or two to lose its dye. The emulsion has to swell and soften first, before the dye will be released completely, I think. The Film Developing Cookbook recommends 3 stand washes of 5 min each, i.e. fill with water, stand 5 min, discard water, repeat...

    Since I use Rodinal single-shot at 1:50 with developing times typically around 10-15 min (after a pre-soak), I don't see much dye get past the developer stage. For other films, the dye is really not much of an issue, and I more often use 1:25 without a pre-soak. Anyway, it is good to experiment and see what works for oneself. TMax (both versions) is a great product, and worth the extra bit of effort.

  10. #20

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    I love Delta 100 film. Meduim format is awesome.

    ToddB

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