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  1. #11
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    I don't know

    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    The Ikonta has a Compur shutter. I have three 50+ year old Compurs on my Linhof outfit, three more Compounds with old Dagors mounted in them - the newest is 1925 or so, the oldest about 1908. Rolleiflex Standard, Compur, 70+ years old. Other cameras with mechanical shutters, Nikons 40-45 years old, all have been serviced with appropriate cold weather oil (supposedly good to -75f). All are utterly reliable in subzero f. temperatures.

    Why do mine work reliably and the OP's do not??
    Shall I request cold weather oil for the rebuild?
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by henry finley View Post
    Because I am thinking in terms of those "tough-dog" repairs, to coin a phrase from the old TV repair days. Those cases when you go back again and again on a service call to keep repairing the same thing, being the DAMAGE that the original problem keeps creating. The set works fine a while, and then whoosh! the same resistor is sitting there burnt to a crisp again.
    Where in God's name is the problem?-- the problem that keeps causing the damage that keeps getting repaired. Now to get away from the TV repair analogy, sometimes the hardest thing in fixing something is to get the blasted thing to have the problem while you're there to repair it. So many times the dadgum problem WON'T SHOW UP, when you've got it up on the workbench. And this cold-weather bug just had that smell. But then, I'm one of those poor slobs who is cursed with the ability to repair everything. There's nothing I can't fix expertly. I would trade that ability in a New York minute for the ability to chase women.
    Freezers with subzero temperatures are not only extant, but common. It's how I check my stuff, minus 18 to 22f is where my little chest freezer runs. Just put the item in a ziploc baggie. One of the first things I learned was to find the problem, not to put a bandaid on the symptom, whether it's an engine, a TV, a watch... well, you know what I mean.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mainecoonmaniac View Post
    Shall I request cold weather oil for the rebuild?
    Yes, if they have it. At least, give them an idea what temperatures it will be subject to. Most any oils will be good in fairly low temperatures, it's when old oils/greases are left in the mechanism that coldweather problems crop up.

    I'm thinking that a really thorough CLA where all the old gunk is removed will solve your problem.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by henry finley View Post
    Thanks. I was only loosely quoting out of a HW Sams book called "Tough-Dog TV Repairs". I'm like you--find the ORIGINAL problem, IF you can get it to show itself while you've got it up on the bench. I had a Pentax ES with a cold-weather problem. Imagine a camera that's not worth $20 on EBAY could become such a strict teacher on problems that hide from the repairman. I could put that camera in the freezer all day, and it would not jam after my repair. Leave it sitting on the table, and it worked. Come back next morning after the wood stove had died out, and darned if it didn't jam again. Tough-dog repairs.
    Good ol' Howard W. I can remember tricks like putting a tomato paste can over a tube to make it heat up faster and maybe show an intermittent problem. Blasting things (not tubes!) with the freon dusters would sometimes show intermittents, too.

    I had a Zenith console with a maddening problem in the convergence circuits, the bottom convergence would change intermittently between good and way off, I traced it to a coil on the convergence board...after about 5 hours.

  5. #15
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
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    Send it to a repairman in Alaska or north Canada , They are the experts , If you want to send south pole people , its summer there now

  6. #16
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mainecoonmaniac View Post
    Shall I request cold weather oil for the rebuild?
    That would be a good idea if you expect to use it in cold weather. I have had cameras CLAed for cold weather and those cameras never gave me problems in hot weather.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  7. #17
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    Thanks for the tip. I used the camera in the cold that's only 20 degrees F. It's freezing but not much below. I love the camera, but it hates the cold. I used it in hot and humid South East Asia with no issues.
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  8. #18

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    I don't know if you've heard back from Mark Hansen and sent the camera in, but if not (so you're still in decision mode), I'd say +1 for him as well. I had a really problematic Compur shutter (on a 75-year-old Bessa) on which he got the timed speeds to purr nicely. (He could not get B & T working, but I don't care much; setting the thing up on a tripod kind of defeats the purpose of a pocketable folder.)

    Normally I would've highly recommended for you to continue with Essex; word I've read over on photo.net is that tragically their business was wiped out by Hurricane Sandy. This is a huge loss to them and their staff who are without their livelihood (to state the obvious, front-line loss) and of course a huge loss to those of us camera nuts who counted on them (to state the selfish view).

    --Dave

  9. #19
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    I've heard from Mark and he's month's behind. As with Essex, I really don't know if I want to give them a try because they've repaired the shutter twice. It could be just my shutter. I'm currently sitting on the fence.
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

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