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  1. #1

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    Riddle me this...Bronica SQ-AI exposure problem.

    I dug out my SQ-AI to shoot snow last night and I did a test roll a few days ago to make sure things were still in tune. I noticed something odd- The 8s setting was not working at all. 4s worked fine as well as 1s and faster shutter speeds but for some reason 8s simply did not work. It looked as it if was shooting as fast as the camera goes (1/500).

    Not really sure how to troubleshoot this any further. I mean, it looks like the 8s setting is simply broken.

    Anyone else experience this?

    As far as I know the batteries are fine.

    FWIW there is a 16s and a B option. Naturally I could use bulb and time 8s but that's no fun.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    hoffy's Avatar
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    Have you tried a different lens?

  3. #3
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    Definately switch out the 4 LR44 batteries, Bronica did specify alkaline, don't substitute for lithium. The shutter is electromagnetically controlled to hold it open; if the batteries sag, especially in the cold, then the sutter will close too fast. If the batteries are bad then it will only fire at top speed 1/500. If you have a motor drive then the drive supplies the power. It must be removed to check the small batteries.
    There is a difference between a shaky or out-of-focus photograph and a snapshot of clouds and fog banks. —Erwin Schrödinger

  4. #4
    lxdude's Avatar
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    ^^^To add to this, Bronica spec'd silver oxide as best, alkaline next, and said no to lithium. I believe both perform similarly in the cold.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  5. #5

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    Morning.

    Hoffy- Sadly I had the other prime lens for my SQ-AI stolen (an 80), so I can't test out another lens

    I measured the voltage on all four of the batteries and they are putting out >= 1.5V so there's no problem there.

    As I said in my previous post, 4s worked which would have only worked if the batteries were okay.

    Thanks!

  6. #6
    DWThomas's Avatar
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    Random musings from an owner of the previous model ...

    1) Were you checking the batteries under load? A typical behavior for weak batteries is increased internal resistance which means they read decent voltage into a minuscule load like a voltmeter, but the output drops rapidly with increased current of a real load. Alas, I can't claim to have any idea what an appropriate load would be.

    2) I believe the shutter system draws power while it's open (the reason for the optional T settings) and 8 seconds would be the most stressful, battery-wise. I also thought the Ai differed from previous models in that the shutter doesn't work at all without a battery, versus the earlier models which default to 1/500.

    3) What finder are you using -- is it passive, or one of the metering varieties. I ask this because I seem to recall the finder can override the camera body settings. But since all my finders are non-metered, I have no first hand experience.

    So I don't know if I'm even close to anything useful here. (Probably not. ) Have you used 8 seconds in the past successfully? It could be that contact on the speed switch is broken or dirty. It's a shame you don't have another lens available. I like these cameras but having substitutes for the various components sure helps with troubleshooting, not to mention provides enough redundancy to keep shooting past problems that crop up.

    Good luck with it.

  7. #7

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    1) No. Good idea though. So you're suggesting I attach a meter to the batteries during an exposure and check the voltage. I think I can do that with these 76's.

    2) Yes, it must. The timing is electronically controlled. (There is a 16s setting).

    3) It's a prism finder that uses the camera batteries to meter. (The Bronica AE prism finder)

    Anything to inspire more troubleshooting is useful.

    I took a photograph without the prism finder, set to 8S, and it worked. So what's a real head scratcher is why 4s works but it seems to completely ignore 8s. I guess my next test is to shoot the prism finder at 16s and see if it times it correctly. If not I can presume that the prism finder is unable to draw enough power from the batteries > 4s to close the shutter and as such is defaulting to 1/500.

    Thanks!

  8. #8
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Cold temperatures can cause havoc with batteries and cameras [mechanical or electronic]. Keep the camera body warm in your coat between photographs and watch for lens fogging.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  9. #9

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    The shutter is in the lens, but the timer is in the camera. So if 4s and shorter work OK, it implies that the shutter is OK. Therefore problem is most likely to be the 8s setting on the speed dial - perhaps the 8s contact is corroded.

  10. #10
    hoffy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew4x5 View Post
    The shutter is in the lens, but the timer is in the camera. So if 4s and shorter work OK, it implies that the shutter is OK. Therefore problem is most likely to be the 8s setting on the speed dial - perhaps the 8s contact is corroded.
    Exactly - this is what I was trying to imply above. You need to somehow eliminate either the lens or the camera from the equation.

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