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  1. #1

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    The question asked a 1000 times: which camera?

    I know, it's been debated over and over, but still, can I ask, please?

    I know I want 6x6. I like the square format (I had Lubitel before it was cool, sadly I gave it away) plus my enlarger only goes to 6x6.

    I'd mostly shoot portraits, macro and landscape. I know, very different subjects requiring quite equipment. If I had to pick 2, I'd probably leave the landscape out, as 35mm is convenient to carry around, and my back seems to object to heavy load.

    Durability is important. Will it last for the next 20, 30 years? Will I find spare parts? A few $100 in price difference today could be meaningless on the long run.

    For now I'm opened to TLR and SLR, but I'm leaning towards SLR due to macro requirements. On the other hand, TLR is more convenient. Maybe I'm better off with 2 cameras?

    Thanks for any suggestions.

  2. #2
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    A Mamiya TLR might work for you, especially with a normal and perhaps a longer lens for portraits. The bellows should allow you do do some close up work...but the paralax (sp?) on a TLR would have to be taken into account. Not what I call a light camera, either...but well built. Since the shutter is on the lens, it can be fixed or replaced without affecting the camera body.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/aandaph...hy/8352826656/

    (I have no connection with the above camera)
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  3. #3

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    Bronica SQ-A is quite cheap but p there with mamiya and hasselblad. you can get multiple backs so you can shoot different films in the same session, different viewfinders, different lenses etc. a great kit camera.

  4. #4
    Richard Sintchak (rich815)'s Avatar
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    The question asked a 1000 times: which camera?

    Rolleiflex SL66
    -----------------------

    "Well, my photos are actually much better than they look..."

    Richard S.
    Albany, CA (San Francisco bay area)

    My Flickr River of photographs
    http://flickriver.com/photos/rich815...r-interesting/

    My Photography Website
    http://www.lightshadowandtone.com

  5. #5
    Richard Sintchak (rich815)'s Avatar
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    The question asked a 1000 times: which camera?

    -----------------------

    "Well, my photos are actually much better than they look..."

    Richard S.
    Albany, CA (San Francisco bay area)

    My Flickr River of photographs
    http://flickriver.com/photos/rich815...r-interesting/

    My Photography Website
    http://www.lightshadowandtone.com

  6. #6

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    Get a Rolleiflex and the Rolleinar closeup lenses (Rolleinar 3 gives the tightest closeup).

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Merritt View Post
    Get a Rolleiflex and the Rolleinar closeup lenses (Rolleinar 3 gives the tightest closeup).
    Or maybe a Rolleicord or Yashica first, to experiment with macro in the TLR form factor and decide whether a separate SLR is necessary. I think it really depends on shooting style---once on, the Rolleinaer sets are trivial to use, but if you switch back and forth between macro and other shots frequently, it could get kind of annoying to have to keep popping two auxiliary lenses on and off.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  8. #8

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    Every camera will have its own set of options, limitations, and ways of merging the two. Close up lenses (i.e. Rolleinar) can be fitted to just about anything, but the image qualiy may be a little less than using a prime lens with bellows focusing or extension tubes. For working very close with TLRs, you have parallax to contend with but dealing with it is not especially difficult, and doesn't require additional gadgets, though they do make life easier.
    Then there is cost, both of the camera and the collection of accessories you'd aquire to make do what you want.

    Only you can decide which trade-offs are important.

  9. #9
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    Another vote for a Rolleiflex with Rolleinars. A Rolleinar 2 will get you about 1/2 life size.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by rich815 View Post
    Some macro with the SL66:
    Beautiful, thank you.

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