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  1. #11
    mr rusty's Avatar
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    and a f/ 2.8
    Really? Depth of Field on medium format at 2.8 I find is quite limiting. You have to be absolutely spot-on on the focus.

  2. #12
    fotch's Avatar
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    The grass in not always greener like you think. The 124G is a good camera.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  3. #13
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    Keep the Yashics at all events... get a 88 and play, but never, I repeat NEVER let go pf the Yashica. It loves you; can't you tell that now, after all these years ???. Stay with what works, Pal.
    Logan

  4. #14
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    Keep the 124G!!!!!!!!!!
    gene LaFord


    Long live Ed "Big Daddy" Roth!!
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------
    "I don't care about Milwaukee or Chicago." - Yvon LeBlanc

  5. #15
    mr rusty's Avatar
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    Here's a suggestion. Keep the 124G - its a great camera, but if you want to try out a medium format SLR, how about 645? unless being not square format is a dealbreaker. I recently bought a Mamiya 645J to complement my Yashica 635. Both very different. I think you would miss the lightness and convenience of the Yash. However, M645J's are cheap. OK, only 500 shutter speed (enough) and no interchangeable back, but a very inexpensive way into medium format SLR. The M645J is *just about* portable. I walk out with it round my neck on a good strap and with a prism finder its certainly useable handheld, but I wouldn't want it to be any heavier. My yash 635 on the other hand, is no heavier than my 35mm kit.

  6. #16

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    Solve the interchangeable back issue and keep your love for the Yashica by buying a second Yashica and loading it with different film. Your accessories will work and your workflow will be unchanged. Of course, that combo might be a little bulkier than an MF SLR with two backs, but probably not by much. I don't have a 6x6 SLR to compare with, but I'd guess 2 Yashicas would be smaller than a Mamiya Pro with 'normal' objective and two backs and slightly larger than a Mamiya 645 Super/Pro with normal objective and 2 backs. I'd bet the 2 Yashicas would be lighter than either two SLR systems I mentioned. Good luck!

  7. #17
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mr rusty View Post
    Here's a suggestion. Keep the 124G - its a great camera, but if you want to try out a medium format SLR, how about 645? unless being not square format is a dealbreaker. I recently bought a Mamiya 645J to complement my Yashica 635. Both very different. I think you would miss the lightness and convenience of the Yash. However, M645J's are cheap. OK, only 500 shutter speed (enough) and no interchangeable back, but a very inexpensive way into medium format SLR. The M645J is *just about* portable. I walk out with it round my neck on a good strap and with a prism finder its certainly useable handheld, but I wouldn't want it to be any heavier. My yash 635 on the other hand, is no heavier than my 35mm kit.
    I agree to keep the 124G. I have a 124 (non-G - the differences are mostly cosmetic) and love it. I also have a Mamiya 645 Pro system. Interchangeable backs and lenses ARE very nice to have, no doubt about that, and with the AE prism finder and winder grip it's much faster to shoot than the Yashica and doesn't need an external meter. My Yashica meter actually works surprisingly well but I don't rely on it carrying my Luna Pro SBC when using it. In 645 systems the 645 Pro does use interchangeable backs but costs more. The Pentax does not. Bronica ETR series does, and is also small and compact and seems well liked.

    On the whole, if I had to give up one or the other - it would probably be the Mamiya system! Don't get me wrong, it's a great camera, very versatile, but compared to the Yaschica it feels like an albatross around the neck, and having the backs and lenses just means I CARRY most of that stuff too. When I'm just strolling around and think I might want a camera I take the Yashica (or 35mm depending on mood and potential subject.) The Yashica always gets admiring looks and compliments too, while non-photographers usually think the Mamiya is some kind of big digital camera.

    There are other, more reliable, systems around that have interchangeable backs. I'd look around at those and wait until you could afford both.
    Last edited by Roger Cole; 02-16-2013 at 11:51 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #18

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    Hmm thanks everyone for the advice! I never though of the idea of getting another TLR, perhaps its a good idea!
    "The Medium is the Message"

  9. #19

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    You may want to consider a serviced Pentacon P6. There are several places in Germany that service them, and can add a film wind indicator as an option (not really necessary if you follow the instructions on how to load the film properly).

    You'll get access to a great range of affordable, good quality lenses, both both German (East and West) and Soviet. The 120mm f2.8 Carl Zeiss Jena is a really nice portrait lens, and not too big either. You could also grab a 50mm Flektogon.

    The "safer" option would be to look for a Bronica SQ-A or the cheapre SQ-B. The bodies and lenses are affordable, and of decent quality.

  10. #20
    msbarnes's Avatar
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    Didn't read the entire thread but for the money, go with a japanse camera over a kiev for sure.

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