Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,713   Posts: 1,483,018   Online: 665
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 27
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area, California, US
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    270
    Metering:
    I use a Minolta in incident mode from old process when I shot color transparency. I used incident for B&W also.
    But I am thinking of getting a spot meter, now that I'm getting ready to use my 4x5 for B&W.
    Each has its pros and cons.
    Look up "sunny 16." It is a basic daylight exposure chart, and it works just fine for B&W and color negative film.

    Film:
    MF is avail in both 120 and 220, but I think there is only 1 emulsion avail in 220. I think the 220 emulsion is a Kodak color negative film. Unfortunately no B&W is available in 220.
    Personally I prefer to use a medium speed film. This gives me exposure control even during bright daylight. During daylight, with 400 speed film I would be maxed out on the camera f16 @ 1/500 sec. I use Ilford Delta 100, because that is what the college class used when I got restarted shooting film. And it does the job for me. My old B&W films are gone; Panatomic-X and Plus-X.

    Developing:
    Plastic or stainless steel (SS) reels. Your choice based on what you are comfortable with.
    I use SS reels only because that is what I learned on, and can load SS reels easier than plastic.

    Scanning:
    I don't know if the Nikon will handle 6x9 format.
    WARNING. TIF files can be HUGE. I scanned a 35mm slide at 4000dpi, and the TIF file was 120 MEGA bytes large !!! I can only image how large a scan from a 6x9 would be.

    You might look into wet printing. Although to do 6x9 you will need to get a 4x5 enlarger. You can find 4x5 enlargers at very affordable to almost give-away prices. Like your camera, you may have to look for a while. It took me almost a year to find my 4x5 enlarger. Some sellers still can't get over how bad the market for enlarger has fallen, you just skip their ads.

    N-Joy your new toy :-)

    That camera is on my camera shopping list.

  2. #12
    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    NYC
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,699
    Nice score on the camera, I have the exact same model. I got mine from nobbysparrow in the past and he is a fast shipper and packs the items well for the trip from japan. There seems to be tons of these cameras these last few months popping up, I remember a little while ago the GSW cameras were much rarer and did not go for under $600, now ive seen them plummet as the market is flooded with them. Maybe its an increase because of the demand for them, as popularity for them has spiked.

    First things first, get the manual for the camera, its a short read. Learn the camera functions when you get it. Learn how to load film correctly in this camera, and you have to remember to tension it when first advancing or you will end up with a loose roll and have light leaks on the edges of the film. Get a good book on the basics of Black and white, I recommend Horenstien's basic black and white photography. Relearn the concepts of DOF with this camera as with the format size increase to 6x9 the dof is different than with the two crop digitals you are used to. Shoot lots. Have fun.

  3. #13
    polyglot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    South Australia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,953
    Images
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by the.ronin View Post
    1) Light metering
    I understand this line of cameras has no light meter. I know I could use the meter in my DSLR set to manual but I foresee my using the MF in times when I might not even carry around the DSLR. Any recommendations on an affordable / entry level light meter?
    If you carry a smartphone (iOS or Android), there are (reflected-light) metering apps you can buy for a couple $ that use the phone's camera to meter the scene. Learn the Sunny-16 rules (google for Ultimate Exposure Calculator). If you get into flash photography, you can either use your DSLR to preview or buy an incident flash meter. Using the DSLR to preview anything shot on chrome is an extremely good idea.

    Quote Originally Posted by the.ronin View Post
    2) Film
    Any recommendations on color and BW film for the Fuji GSW 690II SW? I will likely use 120s equally for the price and the forced discipline of fewer exposures per roll. (Wow this is going to be such a change from my DSLR!!)
    "Which Film" is the classic question with more answers than people to answer it. If you're just starting out on processing, I would suggest either Tri-X or HP5 as they are extremely forgiving of both exposure and development errors. Once you become more proficient, have a look at Tmax films and Acros (better resolution, less grain, less forgiving). For colour, try some Portra and Ektar (both negative) and run at least one roll of Velvia 50 (slides) through it. You won't be able to easily project 6x9 slides but they are a thing of wonder to look at on a light table, can be scanned to produce epic prints and are terribly addictive to some people. You need to be exact with the slide exposure though because the contrast is very high and you get NO latitude for error.

    Quote Originally Posted by the.ronin View Post
    3) Developing
    If possible I would like to minimize the cost of developing film. I would anticipate having colored film developed at a lab given how involved it is. However, I would consider developing BW at home. Any issues I should consider?
    See my FAQ (link in signature). B&W is trivial to do and requires a $50-$100 capital investment, after which it's under $1/roll plus your labour. Colour is very doable but more involved. Absolutely you should process your own B&W.

    Quote Originally Posted by the.ronin View Post
    4) Scanning
    I definitely would consider scanning negatives at home and saving them as TIFF (which I understand preserves the greatest amount of range in the shot). For this, I've been eyeing the CanoScan 9000F. I've read that the Nikon Coolscan scanners are of particularly great quality but just way outside of my price range. From the TIFFs, I plan to export to JPG for online publishing or print to photo paper using an Epson Artisan 710. Again, any recommendations on this setup would be appreciated.
    Hybrid stuff is formally off-topic at APUG, sorry. There's a C41-scan howto in my FAQ though that you might find of value. Do remember that a flatbed will never give you the same quality as a dedicated film scanner; expect about 1200dpi at most a consumer flatbed and you won't be disappointed.

    While it's (much) more labour-intensive, requires darkness and won't share anything for you on the internet, consider getting an enlarger and doing wet-printing. The print quality is far away better than what you can get from most hybrid processes. You can't print slides optically any more (Cibachrome is discontinued) but B&W is easy to print and colour-neg is not much harder. Maybe try it out in a hire-darkroom with someone to show you for an afternoon to see if you like the process and results.

    Quote Originally Posted by the.ronin View Post

    5) Bag
    How do you folks carry this brick? LOL
    Bah, that's a little camera. Ask again when you have an RZ67, 4 lenses, 3 backs, prism, light meter and film to carry... and your 4x5 gear in the other bag.

    (I use a Kata 3N1-30 and Crumpler 7 Million Dollar Home).
    Last edited by polyglot; 02-20-2013 at 08:56 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #14
    agfarapid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    New England
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    178
    Images
    8
    Congratulations on your recent winning auction bid. I purchased one (GW690 I) and it arrived the day before Christmas! For light meter suggestions, you might also want to consider a Sekonic L398. I bought one of these on the bay about 3 years ago for about $75. Although it's primarily incident, it does have accessories for reflected measurement. The beauty of this is that no batteries are required--works on sunlight hitting the photocell. It's not very good for low light levels, but if your shooting primarily in daylight or room light, it will do pretty well and give you an education in metering. Regarding film, suggest you stick to one brand --Trix X, TMX, or HP5 are all excellent. Since I shoot primarily medium format for it's quality and tonality, I stick with ISO 100 films. Stick to 1 developer for the time being. I use Kodak HC-110 diluted 1:31. Lasts forever, inexpensive, one shot (no replenishment or worry about contamination) and works well with most films I've tried. I'm probably in the minority on this, judging from previous posts, but I've standardized on stainless steel tanks and reels. The learning curve on loading your film onto the reels is a bit rough but after you master it, it becomes second nature. Plus the tanks and reels will probably outlast you (mine have been around for over 40 years). Scanning--go on to dpug.org. As mentioned previously Apug's focus is on analog processes, although I have converted to scanning for my work due to time and space considerations. Finally, how to carry this equipment? Bring the camera with you and just go to different places in your area and see what fits--kind of like trying on a pair of shoes. Eventually you'll find one that fits. Best of luck with your new toy.

  5. #15
    vpwphoto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Indiana
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,081
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    7
    Digital... the bullets are free. Film not so much.
    Time is eaten and perhaps wasted more in the digital workflow. If I were in my darkroom NOW... I wouldn't be killing time on APUG.. I'd be listening to Jazz or NPR.
    Bye and
    .... cheers.

  6. #16
    fotch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    SE WI- USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,922
    Hello and welcome to APUG.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  7. #17
    narsuitus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    517
    Congratulations on your Texas Leica! Here is how I use mine.

    Light metering –
    1. Sunny 16 guideline
    2. Gossen Luna Pro
    3. Compact digital

    Film –
    1. Kodak and Fuji 120 or 220 color print portrait film for weddings and portraits (ISO 160 for individual portraits and ISO 400 for group portraits)
    2. ISO 100 or 200 black & white film (whatever I can find)
    3. Fuji and Kodak 120 color slide film around ISO 100 (such as Fuji Astia or whatever is left in my freezer)

    Developing—
    I develop all my black & white film (35mm, 120, 4x5, and 8x10).
    I have a professional lab develop all my color print film (35mm, 120, and 220)
    I develop all my E-6 color slide film (35mm and 120).

    Scanning—
    I use a Canon flatbed scanner that can handle 35mm, 120, and 4x5 film (color negatives, black and white negatives, and mounted or unmounted color slides).

    Bag—
    I use a 9x16x13.5 inch hard case to carry:
    1. Two “Texas Leicas” (6x7cm with normal lens and 6x9cm with wide-angle lens)
    2. An L-bracket to mount my camera on a tripod in a horizontal or vertical position
    3. Filters (polarizing and graduated neutral density)
    4. Cable release
    5. Light meter and/or compact digital camera
    6. Right angle viewfinder attachment
    7. Roll of string to tie branches out of my way


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/11336821@N00/6251222829/

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/11336821@N00/5266483453/

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/11336821@N00/5227596464/
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Fuji Rangefinders sml.jpg   Dark Room 01 sml.JPG   Range Finders 004 sml.JPG  
    Last edited by narsuitus; 02-21-2013 at 09:49 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    San Francisco
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    439
    I have the Gossen Luna-Pro F and can recommend it. I use it for all occasions from landscape work to studio flash.

    I advocate for home developing of both B&W and color film. Since using a stop bath in my C41 process, I have found that results can be very consistent and have enjoyed the process a lot.

    Good luck on your new camera and tell us of your adventures!

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Capital of Oregon Territory
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    745
    Welcome to APUG!

    You've gotten plenty of excellent answers already. For the light meter, also consider Seconic L-208. It is a baby meter that you can mount on the hot shoe. This way it's always attached to the camera and you will have no need to look around for it when grabbing the camera.

    Quote Originally Posted by the.ronin View Post
    How do you folks carry this brick? LOL
    It's Texas Leica! You put it on a back seat of a pickup truck, right next to the shotgun, of course. Just make sure to grab the right tool when you are ready for that rare shot .

    Eugene.
    Last edited by anikin; 02-21-2013 at 11:22 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #20
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southern California & Virginia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,635
    the.ronin, Welcome to APUG.

    I strongly recommend Hewes reels.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin