Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,562   Posts: 1,573,328   Online: 992
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 30

Thread: Sanity Check

  1. #1
    ronlamarsh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Seattle Wash
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    462
    Images
    16

    Sanity Check

    I and my wife are downsizing and I am looking to switch from LF (4X5, 5X7) and get into a hasselblad system: will I be happy?
    No escaping it!
    I must step on fallen leaves
    to take this path

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Southwest Virginia, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    24
    I think the question should be, not will you be happy with a Blad, but will you regret getting rid of your LF gear...? Use all of it :-)

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    St. Louis, Mo.
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    951
    That depends upon if you can live without camera movements and what your largest print size is. It also depends upon if you like a square format. If you crop for a rectangle you end up shooting 645 which may or may not be ok with you for enlargements.

    I own both 4x5 and 8x10 cameras plus a Hasselblad 500cm. If I had to give up one format it would be the 6x6 Hasselblad but that is me and only you can determine the right choice for you.

  4. #4
    StoneNYC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    7,784
    Images
    225
    have any CHEAP technical field cameras? I'll take them off your hands or one of them, I'm desperately seeking a cheap technical field camera, no rails lol

  5. #5
    ParkerSmithPhoto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    888
    Images
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by ronlamarsh View Post
    I and my wife are downsizing and I am looking to switch from LF (4X5, 5X7) and get into a hasselblad system: will I be happy?
    I think you'll be happy if you are looking to spend a whole bunch of money.

    Seriously, the Mamiya RZ67 is an amazing camera. Verticals, horizontals, squares. Super build quality. Love it.

    If you really want a square, the Bronica SQ is available dirt cheap, and the lenses are very crisp and contrasty.
    Parker Smith Photography, Inc.
    Atlanta, GA

    Commercial & Fine Art Photography
    Portrait Photography

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    872
    Images
    24
    Sell the two 4x5s and get a 4x5 reducing back for the 5x7. Two camera formats in the space of one.

  7. #7
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    8,476
    Blog Entries
    51
    Images
    437
    As a former Hasselblad owner (I traded in my kit to get a 5x12 and some holders), I loved the system, but found at one point I wasn't using it enough to justify keeping it around. I've since returned to medium format in the guise of a Rolleiflex 2.8E (notice the square thing coming back?). I really like shooting square and I compose for it most of the time when using the Rollei. I think the best thing to do before you commit to a Hassy system would be to rent one for a week and use it to be sure you'll like it. This is not to ding other medium format systems (I have an RB67 in addition to the Rollei), but the Hassy is lighter and easier to carry than the RB/RZ, and it has a much better lens and accessory selection than the Bronica. Depending on what you want to shoot with it, that may or may not make a difference. If you want to do macro work, the Hassy is hands down superior to the Bronica, and at least the equal of the Mamiya RB/RZ, perhaps better. If you need long telephoto lenses, it's Hassy and RB. Portraits, the RB in some ways has an edge because of the built-in bellows focusing - you can put a 180mm RB lens on the camera and focus close enough to need exposure compensation even before adding any extension tubes. The Hassy classic "Portrait" lens (the 150mm or the 180mm) dont HAVE to have an extension tube but definitely benefit from an 8mm or 16mm extension tube when shooting tight head-and-shoulders or head-only portraits.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    1,344
    Can't go wrong with Hasselblad or RB67. Some form of Technika would be good . . .

    Seriously, I love my Hasselblad. I can't do without my 4x5 system. There are some things a non-view camera just can't do.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    South Africa
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    460
    Images
    14
    Why did you choose LF to begin with? If it had to do with tilt and shift options, then you won't be happy with MF gear unless you change your expectations. Do you print at very large sizes? Then you may have to change your expectations. There are some very sharp lenses for MF, and some fine films like Acros and TMax100, that will allow fair enlargement without resolution or grain being much of an issue. But only you know what your standard is.

    Unless you specifically want to pursue square (which in itself is noble), I do not think the 6x6 is the most practical use of film real estate. Closest to 4x5 in aspect ratio is 6x7 followed by 645. If you routinely print on 8x10, 9.5x12 or 11x14 paper sizes, then 6x7 is the ideal format that requires virtually no cropping. The more efficient system for me is 6x4.5, which prints straight to 12x16 and with minor cropping to 8x10 and 11x14.

    In 6x7 you have the Mamiya 7 rangefinder with its expensive and superb lenses, the Mamiya RB and RZ, and Pentax. In 6x6 of course Hasselblad, Bronica and one or two others. In 645 there's Pentax and Mamiya, and Contax as a higher end system.

    The Pentax 6x7, which is more SLR-like in handling, is an option with superb lenses and decent used prices. I would recommend it for field work above the RB/RZ type cameras, and above the Hasselblads too, perhaps. The Pentax lenses are more geared toward outdoor work in terms of their rendering, the available focal lengths and ergonomics, whereas I think the Hasselblads and Mamiyas excel at people photography and in studio. It is a really good idea to try out a system hands-on before committing to it, as each has its own quirks and output quality that require getting used to. I find the barrel focusing for instance much easier for handholding than the bellows/rail type. Others may see it differently.

    Note: I do not own any Hasselblad equipment, so my experience there is limited, and my opinion is based on what I've seen others produce with it. I do own Mamiya RZ Pro II and Pentax 67 II systems, though. If I had to keep one camera only, it would be the Pentax. In 645 I have a Mamiya 645 AFD II and since recently a Pro TL too. The lenses that I own are all good to excellent. I have yet to try a MF lens that is a real dud, although I do believe there are a few here and there.

  10. #10
    nicholai's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Kolding, Denmark
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    294
    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    have any CHEAP technical field cameras? I'll take them off your hands or one of them, I'm desperately seeking a cheap technical field camera, no rails lol
    Just sold my MPP Micro Technical..... he
    Nicholai Nissen
    Kolding, Denmark
    nicholainissen@gmail.com

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin