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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Nov 2012
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    Choosing a tech. camera.

    I bought a Linhof Technika 70 3 lens outfit around 6 years ago. Amazing stuff! I shot last Saturday, developed the film on Sunday, and scanned it. The T-70 has a way, (it seems to me), of challenging you to go deeper. The camera itself is a masterpiece, and it compells you to do likewise. If it were second rate, I wouldn't go the extra mile in shooting. Every camera purchase is a trade-off of one thing for another. Everyone is different about what they like. A tech.70 with three fast lenses, backs, shade, etc. in great shape is rare and will cost more than the average medium format kit, in like condition. A lot has to do about you, personally. Your priorities. I have owned a lot of cameras since the 1970's. Three hassies, Pentax 6x7, SL66, Rollei twin lens, blah, blah, blah. For me the T-70 is above them all. But it has a lot to do with what you like. You know. Seven people/seventeen opinions! AHHHH,,,life! All the best!

  2. #12
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Jul 2008
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    SE Australia
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    The Linhofs are heavy. A Master Tech + 3 lenses in your backpack will tell you all about it on a 15km walk through the bush. And you'll need to brush up, quickly, on exposure skills (spot metering, duplex metering, incident, reflective... all have their specific uses, no one method being the best for any one situation), and patience, patience, patience. LF can't be rushed and mistakes happen easily.

    Be aware also that the difference between a well exposed medium format image and one from 4x5 will be modest. MF will also of course save you the silly business of loading/unloading film holders (and the attendant mistakes that do happen) and get you a lot more images with a safety margin (in roll film) that sheet film does not afford you.
    Last edited by Poisson Du Jour; 04-29-2013 at 03:30 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  3. #13

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    Nov 2010
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    Tokyo
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    I had a nice Wista 45N system with several lenses and even a roll film back but I sold the whole lot last summer in order to a couple of medium format rangefinders. And while I miss the Wista and wish I had gotten more into it, for me this was the right decision. The cameras I bought in its place get way more use.
    Pentax 67ii, Fuji GF670, Mamiya 6, Pentax 645N
    Chemical Cameras
    My Galleries

  4. #14

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    Sep 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by wilfbiffherb View Post
    i must call upon your assistance once again guys! im thinking of moving on from my bronica sq-a and getting into technical cameras. i dont really know much about them to be honest. i love their style and the effects you can get with lens movements. im a little aware of graflex style ones and the horseman brand but that's about as far as my knowledge goes. can anyone help with any pointers on what to look out for at all? i know some will probably suggest just buying a 4x5 camera but im never going to shoot that big. ill be sticking to 120 film.
    Linhof Super Technika IV, V or Master and a Super Rollex back. The Graflex is a press camera, not a technical camera.

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