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  1. #1
    ted_smith's Avatar
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    A video showing use of V-System Hasselblad at major events?

    Does anyone know of an online video (I have searched YouTube) that shows a photographer using a V-System Hasselblad for shooting a big event like a wedding or similar? I'd like to see how people go about "for real" instead of reading about the theory.
    Ted Smith Photography
    Hasselblad 501CM...my 2nd love.

  2. #2
    cjbecker's Avatar
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    I know two wedding photographers who used the hasselblad system for wedding back in the day. I talked with then for a very long time about it. Both did the exact same thing and it went like this.

    500cm, grip/flash bracket, fully manual flash, 50 80 150 lens, 45 prism.

    They would never shoot tight and would always crop afterwords.

    150 during the cermony

    50 for most everything else

    Flash set for a per determined distance and say 4m at 1/125 at f8 and just shoot away.

  3. #3
    Douglas Fairbank's Avatar
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    Go to htv.hasselblad.com for many Hasselblad based videos. I hope you find what you are looking for there.

    Douglas Fairbank
    www.classicv.co.uk

  4. #4

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    I'm not sure why anyone would think it would be significantly different shooting a wedding with a Hasselblad versus any other camera. Years ago I was shooting weddings with a 35mm and a MF format Bronica EC. The Bronica was setup similarly to the 35mm with a flash bracket and a Vivitar 283. Attached image is of a photographer I know that I caught a shot of during a wedding around 2008. It was rumored he was going to go digital. Not sure if he ever did or not.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 1-Tom-2web_r.jpg  

  5. #5
    ted_smith's Avatar
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    I'm not sure why anyone would think it would be significantly different shooting a wedding with a Hasselblad versus any other camera.
    Maybe not, for the unitiated. But the only experience I have of shooting weddings is with the quite remarkable Nikon F5, which of course takes care of a lot of the metering, max fps of 8 frames, automatic wind on, automatic focus etc etc. These are all things that one has to do manually with a Hasselblad (light meter or Sunny 16, manual wind, manual focus, 12 frames a rolls vs 36 etc etc). So I was curious to see, visually, a photographer 'in action' in those kind of circumstances. I've watched one of a Mamiya photographer, but that's a very different camera to the Hasselblad 501CM.

    Go to htv.hasselblad.com for many Hasselblad based videos
    - good resource for H Systems, but not many videos that I could spot for V-Systems other than two here (http://htv.hasselblad.com/video/me-a...-my-hasselblad).
    Last edited by ted_smith; 03-04-2013 at 02:44 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Ted Smith Photography
    Hasselblad 501CM...my 2nd love.

  6. #6
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    I shot weddings with very manual 35mm range finder cameras with stunning results. And I did not need to shoot at 200 frames per second, because I have used cameras enough to get the moment in one shot. I fact I still cannot see the need to shoot weddings and most other things at the blindingly fast digi-snapper rates of 10,000 frames per second to do the job right. One shot says it all; I don't need no stinkin' machine gun camera.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  7. #7
    rmolson's Avatar
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    I am with you I shot weddings in the 60’s with 4x5 Speed graphics and flash bulbs I was send out with 12 holders ( 24 shots) and had better come back with 24 good sharp well exposed pictures of the pre wedding, ceremony and reception.. no excuses!

  8. #8

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    @ted

    To shoot a wedding just took some pre-planning and working with the couple. Everything that needed to be shot was planned, if necessary right into the wedding script, no seat of the pants "journalistic" style shooting.

    The actual shooting wasn't that difficult.

    For things like the procession, you prefocus on a spot, set the exposure for that distance, and shot when they reached that spot. Quite simple. I still use that method today, prefocus and set the camera to manual focus. This is because I cannot rely on the AF to track focus on the subject. Which of the X many focus points will the camera choose to focus, on the person walking down the aisle, and not someone in the audience. I use single point focus, because I have had the AF choose the wrong focus point and thus the wrong subject a few too many times.

    For activities, such as cake cutting, boquette toss, etc., the key was to shoot at "the key moment," rather than a burst of shots in continuous mode.
    So you had to learn/know the event to be able to anticipate what will happen.
    Even now, I shoot my D70 in single shot mode. I can probably count on one hand the times that I have shot anything in continuous mode.

    Use of a foldout crank rather than a knob to advance film works for a fast 2nd shot. A few used the ELM, ELX motordrive bodies.

    Event coming up (ie. cake cutting), you are near the end of the roll of film. What do you do?
    You plan.
    Same as with a 35mm camera near the end of a roll. If an even is going to happen, such as cake cutting, you don't wait to end the roll to change film. Otherwise you end up stopping the event while you change film...BAD scene. Instead, you change film in advance, so you have enough frames for the next event.

    BTW, it was/is 24 exposures per roll of 220 film. 12 exposure only if you are using 120 film.
    Changing film on a Hasselblad is faster than for you with the F5, even with power rewind to help.
    On the Hasselbad, you swap the backs, the next back is already loaded and set to frame 1, ready to go.
    You could switch to a 2nd F5 camera, and that would be faster, but so can the Hasselblad photog.

  9. #9
    ted_smith's Avatar
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    Thanks all.

    I wasn't suggesting that "spray and prey" was a better technique at all - I was just saying that I am having some difficulty adjusting to the manual nature of my Hasselblad over my F5. For example, I shot some pics of my kids in the garden the other day (have just sent the films off) using my Blad and by the time I'd focussed on my 1.5yr old, he'd moved! So I was constantly trying to get him in focus. I realise its a control of "forseeing" issue - I've just not yet developed those skills. I am all in favour of controlled, single shots, but adjusting my technique for a Blad is proving harder than I thought.
    Ted Smith Photography
    Hasselblad 501CM...my 2nd love.

  10. #10

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    IMHO, I think that spending more time working with the camera in different situations will get you farther than watching a video. Especially for the sort of situation you've described, I'm not sure a video would help more than "just doing it", then doing it some more.

    If you're planning on doing paid work with the Hasselblad, you may want to shoot both with it, and your F5, until you gain more confidence. Use the Hasselblad for some of the set up shots where you have a little more time, and the 35 for candids and such.

    Kids are a challenge, trying to keep up with my 3 YO nieces and get some good pictures on a play ground was quite an exercise, in every way!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails miss_em.jpg  

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