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  1. #11

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    The line on the first image almost looks more like a problem with scanning. Where/how do you get the film processed and scanned?

  2. #12

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    processed and scanned in a "pro" lab here in brussels (limelight http://limelightlab.com/).

    I will inspect the back and insert tonight. I hope it is not serious as back for this are quite hard to find cheap.

  3. #13

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    If you inspect the negatives, does a scratch show? If you line up the negatives on top of eachother, does it show in the same place? I downloaded the images and zoomed in closer, and it looks like it could certainly be a scratch.

    Do you have B&W processing abilities at home? Id suggest running a roll of B&W film through and processing yourself. Take the lab processing and their scanning out of the equation. If you still can detect the scratches on your home processed B&W film, you can be sure its the back.

  4. #14

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    Take a real close look at the negatives. If the scratch isn't there then it would be a scanner fault.
    All paths are the same: they lead nowhere. Choose the one that has heart.

    Don Juan

  5. #15
    L Gebhardt's Avatar
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    Those look like scanning issues to me, assuming color neg active film. If the film was scratched the film would let more light through, which when reversed would give a dark scratch. My guess is dust on the scanner sensor.

  6. #16
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    If the scratches are on the film itself, look to see which side they're on. I'll bet that they'll be on the emulsion side if they're on the film. The backing paper should protect the film from scratches on the base side. One you figure out which side they're on, hold the roll up to the camera back, remembering that the images will need to be "upside down" when held against the back. Then look along your film transport for any surface the emulsion comes in contact with. There might be burr or a tiny piece of grit somewhere.
    Reid

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    "If I had a nickel for every time I had to replace a camera battery, I'd be able to get the #@%&$ battery cover off!" -Me

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by L Gebhardt View Post
    Those look like scanning issues to me, assuming color neg active film. If the film was scratched the film would let more light through, which when reversed would give a dark scratch. My guess is dust on the scanner sensor.
    I have had the same problem recently (ie last week) with a roll of 35 mm film I had developed and scanned. I had assumed that it was the camera as it was a "new" old camera but, as you say, scratches in the emulsion will come out as black lines on a positive picture.

    So, my question: how does a scanner introduce straight lines when it scans? I must admit that the scan I had done has a lot of dust on the scans (also white, suggesting opaque on the negatives).

  8. #18
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    I'm guessing it is the scanner. It looks almost too straight for an in-camera scratch. It would have to be an awfully light scratch to retain the colors in the emulsion, but perhaps not if in the base (I'm just assuming most scratches would go all the way through emusion; I don't know much about these things).
    Truzi

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peltigera View Post
    So, my question: how does a scanner introduce straight lines when it scans? I must admit that the scan I had done has a lot of dust on the scans (also white, suggesting opaque on the negatives).
    If it's dust on the sensor, it will travel perfectly across the image with the scanning arm. Dust on the image or the platen is something else entirely.
    All paths are the same: they lead nowhere. Choose the one that has heart.

    Don Juan

  10. #20

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    There is very little DOF with a scanner lens, all too evident by the number of people who make home made adjustments to get their scanner focused. Some are better than others, but essentially if there is some dust on the scanner lens it will be so far out of focus that it couldn't show up as a sharp line.

    The OP should look for something that would scratch the film, and while the backing paper offers some protection to the base side, the emulsion still gets dragged across the film gate, either supported by rollers, or with cruder cameras right across a smooth painted surface. But it looks like a processing scratch to me.

    Steve
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