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  1. #11
    polyglot's Avatar
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    Multicoating can't fix that sort of veiling flare from oblique light because it's due to the light hitting the inside surfaces of the lens and camera bodies and then bouncing around. It's mostly not from the glass or glass surfaces.

  2. #12

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    I have older "chrome" 50mm, 80mm 150mm Hassy lenses and they all seem pretty good, but a shade is always on them, even indoors. One of the more problem Hasselblad lenses for me is my 38mm Biogon on my SWC and a proper hood isn't a ton of help. This lens certainly improves with the "T" coating I think, because of all the elements and the design curves of those elements. Just my opinion of course. JohnW

  3. #13

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    Are your lenses clean? I mean really clean, no trace of haze inside? Check for this by shining a bright light through the lens with the shutter and aperture wide open. Just a little haze can exacerbate flare.

  4. #14
    Douglas Fairbank's Avatar
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    I dont see anybody mention the difference made by modern paints and lightproofing. Even with the Hasselblad T* optics the later lenses were markedly better because of improved paints and shutter and iris blade coatings. Big changes were made just before the introduction of the CF range and is has never stopped and never will so long as new materials continue to be invented. H camera lenses have carbon fibre shutter blades for example.

    Douglas Fairbank
    www.classicv.co.uk

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by msbarnes View Post
    hasselblad lenses are pretty flare resistant, right?
    I am not sure what you are referring to as "hasselblad lenses." If you mean Zeiss lenses for medium format SLRs then you can buy them for a number of systems. I'm more familiar with the offerings for the Rollei 6000 series medium format SLRs. As others have said though they aren't magical. There is no substitute for a good lens hood and paying attention to where your light source is. Even with Zeiss glass and a OEM lens hood I still hide my camera behind tree trunks or poles to protect it from oblique sunlight.

  6. #16
    msbarnes's Avatar
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    I'm specifically referring to the Zeiss CF lenses made for the 500 series; that is what I meant by Hasselblad lenses, and I think that most people understood that as well.

    I understand that you have to pay attention to the light source and everything but some lenses do handle those situations better than others. I usually don't shoot into the sun / bright sources but sometimes, I kind of want to.

  7. #17
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    I've had to get a proshade becuase of a few flare issues from using the plastic hoods.

  8. #18
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    I have not had flare problems with the Hasselblad T* CF lenses including the 903 SWC 38mm lens
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by msbarnes View Post
    I'm specifically referring to the Zeiss CF lenses made for the 500 series; that is what I meant by Hasselblad lenses, and I think that most people understood that as well.
    Is there any optical improvement between the Zeiss CF lenses and other "late" model Zeiss lenses in different mounts?

  10. #20
    Slixtiesix's Avatar
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    Mostly not. The CFi update was merely a barrel redesign. Only the 40/4 IF that was released in 2003 was a complete new design.
    The 50/4 was redesigned slightly somewhen in the 80s and floating elements were added. The 38mm Biogon was recomputed around 2000 for the 905 series because they had to refrain from using lead, but this did not result in a real optical improvement. All other lenses (30mm, 60mm, 80mm, 100mm, 120mm, 150mm, 180mm, 250mm, Superachromats) are optically identical in their CF and CFi/CFE incarnation.

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