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  1. #1
    msbarnes's Avatar
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    hasselblad lenses are pretty flare resistant, right?

    JUST making sure.

    I was never really bothered by flare but then I did a shoot at the beach with my 2.8E (single-coated, and with a hood) and it flared under not-the-easiest lighting situations. It wasn't really THAT bad but I sometimes think about getting a Hasselblad for situations like this (beach and snow scenes).

    I'm interested in the 60-120 lenses mostly. I read that the Planar design isn't really a flare-fighter but with multi-coating...maybe it is? I'd

  2. #2
    jp498's Avatar
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    I don't know what's made for Hasselblad, but you can't go wrong with a tessar or triplet in regards to flare as there are fewer glass-air interfaces to cause reflection. Single coated is plenty for those lenses. A triplet isn't going to be as sharp, and a tessar probably won't be 2.8 and if it were, it wouldn't be crisp at the edges wide open, but stopped down it's great.

  3. #3

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    This is one of the reasons the Tessar (1902) was considered an improvement on the Planar (1896) in the era of poor coatings.

  4. #4
    Slixtiesix's Avatar
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    My Rolleiflex T is also very prone to flare if the sun hits the front lens, though it has a Tessar. From my experience, the only thing that will reduce flare dramatically is a good shade. Some years ago I´ve made a "scientific" test on slide film, using some of my Rollei lenses, single- and multicoated, with and without shades, while the sun was shining on the front lenses in a 45° angle. The result was the following: Multicoating did not really improve resistance to flare by much. Neither did the original lens shade for the 80mm Planar, though it did help a little. The by far best result was with the 250mm lens, compendium shade and mask for this lens.
    I think a Hasselblad will be more flare-resistant than a Rollei TLR, but only because there are larger shades available. The 100-250mm shade is quite large. I think a 100/3,5 CF together with this shade will reduce flare in your pictures a lot. But when used without a shade, I don´t think there will be an overwhelming difference to the Rollei. Problem with TLRs is that you can´t use huge shades since they would interfere with the viewing lens. The zoom you mentioned can only be used with the 200 or 2000 Series, but from what I´ve read, it is pretty good.

  5. #5
    msbarnes's Avatar
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    Here is a sample of flare,


    Untitled by Michael_Sergio_Barnes, on Flickr


    I expected this and it really isn't really THAT bad but I'm wondering if a Hasselblad 80mm/100mm would eliminate this. The newer Rolleiflex's (GX, FN, I think that they are called) are just too expensive. But I also have an MX-EVS and I might test that for the heck of it since I own one. I don't need an f2.8 for situations like this.

  6. #6
    Richard Sintchak (rich815)'s Avatar
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    hasselblad lenses are pretty flare resistant, right?

    Hi Michael, yeah a Hassy might do a little better but its not so bad as is. Plus a Hassy handheld under those circumstances may have not been as sharp due to camera shake and mirror slap, or may have required a faster shutter speed and/or faster film. The Rolleiflexes and their quiet and so smooth leaf shutter are so great for that kind of shooting you did there. So it's a give and take. Wonderful set, lovely woman.
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  7. #7

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    My CF 150 flares some. The 80/2.8 CF doesn't.

  8. #8

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    I've never had a Hasselblad 80 or 150 flare like that, but I always use a lens hood.

  9. #9

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    If you shoot in conditions like this frequently, get a Hasselblad pro lens shade, one of the bellows models.

  10. #10
    msbarnes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rich815 View Post
    Hi Michael, yeah a Hassy might do a little better but its not so bad as is. Plus a Hassy handheld under those circumstances may have not been as sharp due to camera shake and mirror slap, or may have required a faster shutter speed and/or faster film. The Rolleiflexes and their quiet and so smooth leaf shutter are so great for that kind of shooting you did there. So it's a give and take. Wonderful set, lovely woman.
    Thank you for your compliments! I agree with you completely in the virtues of the flex and I wouldn't put down my Rolleiflex after this shoot. I like to travel light, camera-wise, and I did two shoots on a trip home in completely different lighting. My next shoot was under very poor lighting and I was forced to shoot under 1/8 - 1/15 shutter speeds and most of them turned out pretty good (camera-shake wise).


    Untitled by Michael_Sergio_Barnes, on Flickr

    I'm in no rush to get a Hassy, but I just wanted to know it's flare-fighting reputation for the focal lengths that I'm considering. It sounds that if I do get a Hassy that I'm better off going pro-shade?

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