Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,499   Posts: 1,543,275   Online: 935
      
Page 3 of 13 FirstFirst 123456789 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 128
  1. #21
    Fixcinater's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    San Diego, CA, USA
    Shooter
    127 Format
    Posts
    879
    Images
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Gales View Post
    Normally they tell you to double the focal length of a lens that you use with a 35mm camera to get what you want with a 6x7 camera. Of course this is an approximation.
    <snip>
    I'm no lens expert but from my understanding, Bokeh is determined by the lens aperture. The more aperture blades a lens has, the more circular the aperture. Lenses with great Bokeh have a very circular aperture.
    Alan, agreed on the first point. 55mm f/1.8 on 35mm film looks a lot like 105mm f/2.4 on 6x7.

    Agreed somewhat on second point, the aperture blades only factor in when you're using them. Some lenses don't have smooth/nice bokeh even when wide open.

  2. #22
    Slixtiesix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    726
    Images
    21
    Some lenses don't have smooth/nice bokeh even when wide open.
    Yes that´s true. The aperture geometry is just responsible for the highlight discs but it has nothing to do with the overall quality of the bokeh.
    And even if you have a lens with pentagonal or hexagonal aperture shape you can easily avoid showing it by choosing an uniform background without any backlight sources, e.g. the sky or a distant wall. But if you shoot against a tree with the sun gleaming trough all its branches, you will have dozens of them in the bokeh.

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    St. Louis, Mo.
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    845
    From my understanding, the definition of Bokeh is the bright out of focus areas of the background which would be controlled by lens aperture.

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    41
    Hi, You could always mount a pre war lens from a Folder camera on a bellows with an adaptor on your Canon. The lenses are pretty cheap and you could do a lot of experimenting with bokeh and dof. Good Luck, Henk.

  5. #25

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    St. Louis, Mo.
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    845
    Quote Originally Posted by Fixcinater View Post

    Agreed somewhat on second point, the aperture blades only factor in when you're using them. Some lenses don't have smooth/nice bokeh even when wide open.
    Yeah, you are right about the aperture blades not affecting bokeh when shooting wide open.

  6. #26
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,994
    Images
    6

    You're correct Sir

    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    You mean field or angle of view, not perspective. Perspective depends solely upon one's point or position of view, regardless of format and focal length. Also, since the aspect ratio of 35mm is 3:2 and the aspect ratio of 6x7 is 7:6, focal length/field of view comparisons don't really work.

    I'm not really sure what the OP is asking.
    Yes I meant field or angle of view. And yes, 35mm is slightly wider than 6x7 format. It's just an approximation.
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  7. #27
    lxdude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Redlands, So. Calif.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,646
    Quote Originally Posted by Mainecoonmaniac View Post
    Yes I meant field or angle of view. And yes, 35mm is slightly wider than 6x7 format.
    Which is why 50mm- 58mm is considered normal instead of 43mm.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  8. #28

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Montgomery, Il/USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,093
    Quote Originally Posted by lxdude View Post
    Which is why 50mm- 58mm is considered normal instead of 43mm.
    I'd argue that in most circles the diagonal of the film is the determent factor in defining "normal" not focal length..

    35mm=~43mm
    6X6cm=~100mm
    6X9=~110mm
    4X5"=135mm etc.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  9. #29
    lxdude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Redlands, So. Calif.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,646
    Quote Originally Posted by John Koehrer View Post
    I'd argue that in most circles the diagonal of the film is the determent factor in defining "normal" not focal length..

    35mm=~43mm
    6X6cm=~100mm
    6X9=~110mm
    4X5"=135mm etc.
    Yes. What makes the 50mm range appear "normal", and a 43mm seem slightly wide, is the format. The 3:2 ratio of width to height makes the 135 frame look wider than 5:4, 4:3, or 1:1.
    This is most obvious with panoramic formats. My 645, in full format of 42X56 gives a very different "look" than with the 35mm pano back with the same lens. The image with the pano back can even give the appearance of being a wide shot with the 75mm lens, a "short telephoto" length on the 135 format and "normal" on the 645.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  10. #30
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,994
    Images
    6

    As for me..

    Quote Originally Posted by lxdude View Post
    Which is why 50mm- 58mm is considered normal instead of 43mm.
    My eyeballs see a bit wider than 50mm focal length. I think my vision is more between 35-43mm. Sometimes, 50mm makes my shots feel tighter than what I see. 35mm lens feels more natural for me. Love the Bokeh of my 50mm 1.4 wide open though.
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

Page 3 of 13 FirstFirst 123456789 ... LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin