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Thread: 500 c/m vs. RB

  1. #51

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    I went with 501c and I've considered RB/RZ.

    Since I travel with my kit, the hassy made a lot more sense due to weight. With 80mm back it weights 1.4kg. Add 150mm lenses and also my 35mm kit + lots of film to last 2 weeks while overseas it starts to get pretty heavy.

    Also it's very easy to hold it with my left hand and access all of the controls with my right hand.

    I would say if you planning to take your gear out a lot, go with hassy due to weight.

  2. #52
    agfarapid's Avatar
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    I have an RB Pro s with 180, 90 and 50mm lenses. I also have a 500c (with a recently jammed shutter) with the 80 Planar. The Hassey is smaller, lighter with older technology. The RB has a much gentler and smoother shutter release, more precise (for me) rack and pinion focusing and a larger negative size. Optically, in real use, the lenses are about equal although I'll give the nod to the Mamiya for sharpness and contrast. One of the nice things about the Mamiya is that you need not keep your finger depressed on the shutter for the longer shutter speeds as in the Hasselblad. True, the Mamiya is a boat anchor but you kinda get used to it. Also, close-ups are a breeze for the RB due to the bellows. Really, it all depends on your shooting style and needs. Regarding mirror slap, the Mamiya feels smoother than the Hassey (although this is very subjective).
    Last edited by agfarapid; 04-29-2013 at 10:22 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by jovo View Post
    The principal reason I'd want a Blad is for the leaf shutter lenses, and absence of shutter curtain slap (it does create a small double image even with mirror lock up on exposures of several seconds.) .
    I read the sentence as referring to the Hasselblad.
    Sorry 'bout that.
    Last edited by John Koehrer; 04-30-2013 at 08:01 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  4. #54

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Rice View Post
    I understand that at current prices I should just try both, but setting up my darkroom has gone WAY over budget. I further understand that the Zeiss lenses have that little bit of magic stirred in (I have and use a Contax RTS.) I am also aware that the 'blad has operational 'issues' and that the RB is bigger and heavier So.......

    If you were starting from scratch, which system would you buy into?
    There is nothing special or magic about Zeiss lenses. It's just a brand name, much like Nikkor. If I had a choice and money wasn't an option I would stay with the RB/RZ series without a doubt

  5. #55

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shootar401 View Post
    There is nothing special or magic about Zeiss lenses. It's just a brand name, much like Nikkor. If I had a choice and money wasn't an option I would stay with the RB/RZ series without a doubt
    Blasphemy!


    I think it's funny how some photographers get so caught up with certain brands when shooting 35mm, medium format or digital. They think that whatever they use is the absolute best.

    Most large format photographers own lenses of various brands.

  6. #56
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jovo View Post
    The P67 has a focal plane curtain shutter. It's big enough that its mass vibrates the tripod mounted camera enough to register a visible double image on an exposure of multiple (I don't remember exactly, but a bracketed series of up to 45" I think) seconds. I photographed the 59th Street bridge and some roof top views of 57th Street a few years ago at night, and that's what happened. The prints from that session are nice, but I can't go beyond 11x14 nominal without seeing the doubled point source lights on the bridge. I don't believe a leaf shutter would have allowed that.
    Assuming this really is a problem, for long exposures use the "hat trick." Hold a card (or hat, thus the name) over the lens while you open the shutter with a release in the other hand. Then let vibrations settle and move the card or hat away from the lens and time the exposure with your watch. Then cover the lens again at the end and then close the shutter. It's harder to describe than to do, plenty accurate for exposures of a few seconds or longer, and cures the problem.

  7. #57
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Between these two it seems very simple to me. If you want to shoot always off a tripod, get the RB. If you want to carry it around on a neck strap and shoot handheld, even occasionally, get the Hasselblad.

    Of course there are other options in both formats. The Fuji and Mamiya rangefinders are much much more easily hand held in 6x7 as, for that matter, is the Pentax. There are other 6x6 cameras and then 645 if you always crop. I have a 6x6 TLR and sometimes I crop those negs to rectangles and sometimes I leave them square.

    I also have a pretty large Mamiya 645 Pro kit and the comment above about it adding up is spot on. With the camera, several backs, AE prism, three lenses etc. it weighs more than my 4x5 Tech III kit complete with three lenses and holders. (My 8 lb. tripod I always take with the 4x5 and not always with the Mamiya more than makes up for that though.) Of course I don't have to take the whole kit. I can just walk around with the camera, one back and one lens and have fun taking pictures. Then again for that kind of shooting I enjoy the TLR even more. Sometimes there are too many choices!

  8. #58

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    Between these two it seems very simple to me. If you want to shoot always off a tripod, get the RB. If you want to carry it around on a neck strap and shoot handheld, even occasionally, get the Hasselblad.
    The OP describes himself as an 8x10 Shooter. I figure shooting the lightweight Hasselblad handheld would be a welcomed change every once in a while. I know it is for me.

  9. #59

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    I am leaning toward the 'blad though the RB prices sure are attractive. Thanks everyone.

  10. #60

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    i have both, 500C/M (50 and 80mm lenses) and an RB67 ( 50,65,90,180 & 250mm lenses) both have their place in my collection.

    the Hassy is light enough to carry around and isnt too big, i mainly use the RB67 for landscapes, do shoot it handheld a lot though, mirror slap isnt a huge issue, with the 50mm, i shot it at 1/15th once with no blur. and 6x7 is nice.
    my photo blog;
    www.jamesruff.net
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    35mm/6x4.5/6x6/6x7/6x17/4x5

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