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  1. #21
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    I looked over a Hasselblad 503CW in March 2012, owned by an APUG member; it looked new, undeniably pretty and shiny in the stalwart Hasselblad tradition. Returning home, I researched the camera and considered that Hasselblad no longer made it, and never thought any more of it, so this announcement, a year on, propagated in the Hasselblad newsletter, was quite strange; lots of people think that Hasselblad discontinued most analogue models some years back in favour of the digital breed. Maybe they had a back-inventory of the cameras, now exhausted?

    But there's something everybody needs to know and keep in mind: you do not need a Hasselblad to create beautiful photographs, not at all. Truth be told, a Hasselblad will not even help you! It's not the camera that does the seeing and feeling, but the photographer. So we are not deprived of choices losing one or more (or all) of these cameras and can actually land the alternative camera of our dreams (6x7, 4x5 or 8x10, among) without mortgaging the home or selling the wife, just for the privilege of carting around a Hassy on our hairy chest. Ugh, perish the thought.
    Come on mate be serious, a woman's just a woman, but a Hasselblad's a "Hasselblad"
    Last edited by benjiboy; 04-30-2013 at 06:13 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Ben

  2. #22
    Slixtiesix's Avatar
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    The newest Hasselblad 503cw I´ve seen so far were from 2008/2009. I wonder wether there are really cameras with VS, VV or VH stamped on it... I also wonder if the CFV50 and CFV39 are effected by this as well.
    Anyhow, I would not bother. Mind that most Rollei TLRs date from the 50s and 60s and Rollei TLR photography is alive and well today. There is no reason the same could not be true for Hasselblad.
    Last edited by Slixtiesix; 04-30-2013 at 06:39 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #23
    Dr Croubie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    you do not need a Hasselblad to create beautiful photographs, not at all.
    Yeah, but that's not the point. Me holding hasselblad doesn't help me make better photos, but photos of me holding it are better (especially if it's in front of my face)
    An awful lot of electrons were terribly inconvenienced in the making of this post.

    f/64 and be there.

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post

    But there's something everybody needs to know and keep in mind: you do not need a Hasselblad to create beautiful photographs, not at all. Truth be told, a Hasselblad will not even help you! It's not the camera that does the seeing and feeling, but the photographer.
    Not always true. Different cameras have different expressions and different personalities. A camera can get in the way of your vision or it can get a little less in the way of your vision. Experience will make you choose the camera that offers the result as close as possible to your photographic vision or style. You can paint with red paint even tho you prefer blue but no doubt you will be more pleased using blue paint. Personally i feel the Hasselblad offer something unique. Or should say, the specific Carl Zeiss lenses in combination with the format size offers somthing unique.

    A practical example. I worked with a D300/D2H for a couple of years and found that i always was chasing something in the editing process. Eventually i switched to a Canon 1DSmkII as a part of a personal project and bang! I was completly floored. All those hours spent tweaking the imagery i was now getting straight out of the camera before editing. That doesnt mean the Canon were a superior camera it just ment that it suited my eye better although both cameras were capable of proffesional work.

  5. #25
    fotch's Avatar
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    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  6. #26
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    Even though I hardly ever use my 'blad anymore, I've kept it because for less than the cost of a full frame DSLR I can buy a used digital back for it and get much better image quality than a Nikon or Canon full frame DSLR can render. And I can still use film in it just by switching backs. What's not to like? (and yes, I think Ilford will still be making 120 film long after I'm dead and buried).
    Jim

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    IBut there's something everybody needs to know and keep in mind: you do not need a Hasselblad to create beautiful photographs, not at all. Truth be told, a Hasselblad will not even help you! It's not the camera that does the seeing and feeling, but the photographer. So we are not deprived of choices losing one or more (or all) of these cameras and can actually land the alternative camera of our dreams (6x7, 4x5 or 8x10, among) without mortgaging the home or selling the wife, just for the privilege of carting around a Hassy on our hairy chest. Ugh, perish the thought.
    Used, a Hasselblad is not expensive, a body, waistlevel finder and back costs about the same as an entry level DSLR. Even a Pentax MZS used cost about the same amount as a used 500 C/M or even more. New they were still less than most full frame DSLRs and those sell well and I do not see many people selling wifes to buy those.

    I "see" differently when I am shooting different formats, both the aspect ratio and the process necessary change one's approach to a location or subject and my wife uses the Hasselblad too. Saving $200 on a body to buy a different make of MF camera is not much although the lenses seem a lot more on the used market however one can sell them for more as well. I may have been just as happy with another system but there were personal advantages for me to go with a Hasselblad and I do not think the amount of extra money spent going with the V system compared to another medium format was worth worrying about and will amortize over the period I have it to less than 5 dollars per month.

  8. #28
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    I am not surprised. They were not the first camera company to stop production of film cameras, but they did continue long after the others.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    I am not surprised. They were not the first camera company to stop production of film cameras, but they did continue long after the others.

    I don't know, that's why I'm asking, so how long was the 503CW in production for Mr Serius? Even as an "outsider" not involved with Hasselblad, the stalwart 500cm that I've seen so often from weddings to snow back country seems to have been in production for many, many decades, and literally bushell-basketfulls of those bodies are available for peanuts in dealers.
    “The photographer must determine how he wants the finished print to look before he exposes the negative.
    Before releasing the shutter, he must seek 'the flame of recognition,' a sense that the picture would reveal
    the greater mystery of things...more clearly than the eyes see."
    ~Edward Weston, 1922.

  10. #30
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    I don't know, that's why I'm asking, so how long was the 503CW in production for Mr Serius? Even as an "outsider" not involved with Hasselblad, the stalwart 500cm that I've seen so often from weddings to snow back country seems to have been in production for many, many decades, and literally bushell-basketfulls of those bodies are available for peanuts in dealers.
    17 years, Siriusly.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

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