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  1. #11
    Mark Fisher's Avatar
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    I came to the opposite conclusion. I used to shoot 4x5 and 35mm. Now I shoot almost entirely medium format (Fuji rangefinder and Hasselblad). The thing that finally broke me was trying to load holders in the field without getting dust on the film. I do miss movements sometimes, but I can mostly deal with perspective issues in the darkroom when I really need to. I also really hate sweating under a darkcloth in the summer and frosting up in the winter. All that said, I'm building an 8x10 to make negs for Pd/Pt printing......(:
    Your first 10,000 pictures are the worst - HCB

    www.markjamesfisher.com

  2. #12

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    I have fun shooting my RB7.

    Jeff

  3. #13
    DWThomas's Avatar
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    These days, most of my film shooting is medium format -- it's the Goldilocks thing . . .

    Not too big, not too small, ju-u-u-ust right!

  4. #14
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    I stepped up from using 35mm for decades. The image quality of MF is superb, the image itself around 400% bigger than 35mm, and by dint of that, a lot of room for contrast and tonal range to be spread out. And it's marvellous to master spot metering. I don't think there is a big different image quality wise from MF to LF (4x5) if you only do small prints/enlargements. For me, I might one day need an ULF because I persistently push print sizes higher and higher. MF has a wider variety of film available than the limited range for LF. In a nutshell, MF is very convenient, agreeable, quality and happy medium to use and I won't be moving away from it.
    “The photographer must determine how he wants the finished print to look before he exposes the negative.
    Before releasing the shutter, he must seek 'the flame of recognition,' a sense that the picture would reveal
    the greater mystery of things...more clearly than the eyes see."
    ~Edward Weston, 1922.

  5. #15
    heterolysis's Avatar
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    I wouldn't say that speed of use is always a positive thing. Ease of use however is, and I feel that with a handheld light meter and my 500C/M I am far better off than were I dinking around with my Nikon N80. Even if it is slower.

    I carry my Hasselblad quite frequently for hours on end, walking. Pick one lens, load one roll in the back and slip another in your pocket, and you're set.

  6. #16
    piu58's Avatar
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    I havelots of equipment. My most loved and most used camera is my Rolleiflex 3,5F. Operation is not such fast like 35mm, but mostyl fast enough. (The meter is still working).
    ---
    Uwe Pilz

  7. #17
    Slixtiesix's Avatar
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    Like most people I started with 35mm. After a few years I became fascinated by LF and bought an old 4x5" camera. It was fun to use, but loading and developing the film was a hassle to me and I frequently mixed up the thing with the dark slide and pre-exposed the film by accident. Since I don´t do my own color work, that was also drawback for me. After that I bought a Rollei TLR and realised that this was what I was searching for. I think medium format is the best compromise in speed, format, size of viewfinder, shots per roll and portability although it does not excel in any of these aspects. Barry Thornton made a comparison with motorcycles that he used to drive in his youth in his book "The edge of darkness". While a 125ccm machine was agile, it lacked power. A 500ccm machine was a steamhammer, but heavy and ponderous. A 250ccm machine was both agile and powerful, though not to the extremes of the other two. He ended using this one.
    Last edited by Slixtiesix; 05-01-2013 at 03:40 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #18
    ajmiller's Avatar
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    I don't use 35mm much (apart from digital 5D2) but find different jobs/ projects depend on having the right camera available. I have shelved some gear and whittled it down to Mamiya C330s for urban street work, Wista 45DX with one lens for LF work out in the landscape and RB67 for studio colour work. GAS is a right pain sometimes but I keep myself safe from it these days by being poor!
    regards,

    Tony

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by EASmithV View Post
    Hello all,

    I have a bit of a conundrum lately-

    Mainly about gear. I find myself shooting around 3 formats for a shoot, which works for me. Last shoot it was 4x5, Digital, and some polaroids. But I have so much stuff I want to try making images with, and I can't use it all at once. I've been thinking of really considering unloading some, or at least clearly defining it's strengths
    After nearly forty years I still find working with more than one camera at a time (during the course of a 'shoot') to be unproductive and distracting from the task at hand. Go out with one camera, and whatever camera that is will dictate the ranking of the rest.

    But you don't need to unload equipment to clear your head, just put it away in a drawer and forget you have it. Use your large format or digital to exhaustion and when you feel like a re-fresher go to the drawer and see if whatever you take out can add to the work you have in mind. Going from 4x5 to 6x6 can be fun, but equally it can remind you why you went with 4x5 in the first place, and visa versa. So don't rule anything out, but concentrate on one format/camera as the datum point from which others are judged.

    Steve

  10. #20

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    I hardly ever use my 35mm, a Leica M7. I always thought that if my house caught fire, I'd save the Mamiya 7 and 43mm lens however as time passes I fall more in love with 6X6 and my Hasselblad. It's tiny compared to an RZ67, it has convenient interchangeable backs, it's just so simple to use and coupled with the symmetry of 6X6 I feel it sets me free.
    Last edited by Ghostman; 05-01-2013 at 05:13 AM. Click to view previous post history.

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