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  1. #51
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Newt_on_Swings View Post
    Tlrs are pretty fun to use. Most people that see them get a real kick out of it, and are usually awed by the focusing screen. someone had called it live view once hehe. There's a learning curve for sure, especially framing moving subjects. I think you should try an inexpensive model out before plunking down a good amount and end up not liking it.
    I encountered at least one person that was rather incredulous that the ground glass view didn't involve a battery and electronics.

    Oddly, one person who was put off in frustration by the right/left reversed view had no problems with the inverted view on the ground glass of the 4x5 and loved the big camera. I suppose being reversed is ok as long as it's also inverted, making it still correct in a sense.

  2. #52

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    Quote Originally Posted by rich815 View Post
    Define "clunky".
    Perhaps ungainly is a better word. The C33 weighs 6 pounds. Swap out the 80 mm lens and add the 180 mm one and the grip and you're around 10 lbs. Try walking about for more than a few minutes with this weight around your neck. A wonderful camera when used on a tripod. I tend to think of TLRs in terms of contemplative photography where there is no time constraint.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  3. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    Oddly, one person who was put off in frustration by the right/left reversed view had no problems with the inverted view on the ground glass of the 4x5 and loved the big camera. I suppose being reversed is ok as long as it's also inverted, making it still correct in a sense.
    I agree, when the image is inverted the brain is immediately cued that things are not what they seem. When the image is merely reversed one must make a continuous effert to remember that the image is reversed. This reversal is particularly annoying when trying to track a subject moving from left to right and vice versa. One tends to first move the camera in the wrong direction. The problem goes away after a period of use but returns whenever there is a period of disuse.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  4. #54
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    I've seen the Mamiya TLRs but never held one. I had no idea they weighed 6 pounds, presumably without the lens, or is that with the 80mm? Either way, that makes them even more different animals from Rolleis and Yashicas than I thought.

  5. #55

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    A YashicaMat (pre 124) weighs just over 1100g. A C33 with 80mm lens is around 2170g, and the Mamiya 6 with 75mm is about 1140g. The full comparison table is at http://grahampatterson.home.comcast....tml#Heading141

    Weight is not the whole story. TLRs are basic boxes, and balance well, especially on a neck strap at waist height. The Mamiya C series need a very different grip to handle them, and are probably not the easiest to hand hold. The mass of the camera does absorb some vibration, though. The Mamiya 6 rangefinder holds well, but the eye-level position makes handholding a little less stable.

    In many ways the nice thing about a TLR (except perhaps the Mamiya C) is that you don't get tempted to carry a lot of extra bits. My closeup lens set, a couple of filters, and a lens hood live in cases on the camera strap. Add film and a lightmeter and I'm off. No need to debate about needing a long or wide lens.
    I feel, therefore I photograph.

  6. #56
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    The C series Mamiya TLRs are built like tanks particularly the earlier ones, the last versions of the C330 were more plasticy though. I enjoyed using mine but for some of my work at the time the Mamiya 645s I replaced them with were more practical (I was using them commercially).

    I prefer the weight of my Rolleiflex and Yashica, unobtrusive and easy to carry even in the extreme heat in Turkey.

    Ian

  7. #57

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    I've seen the Mamiya TLRs but never held one. I had no idea they weighed 6 pounds, presumably without the lens, or is that with the 80mm? Either way, that makes them even more different animals from Rolleis and Yashicas than I thought.
    That is the weight with the 80mm lens. The 80 mm lens alone weighs 12 ounces. the 180 mm lens with shade is close to 2 pounds. The 180 plus shade extends 5 inches from the camera body. A formidable piece of equipment.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  8. #58

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    I have just weighted my C330 (early version) with a 80mm lens and it's 1,7 kg (3,7 pounds). I never use a tripod or a strap as I find the camera very easy to hold in my palm, even with the 180mm Super attached. It's my preferred camera.

  9. #59
    Pioneer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by grahamp View Post
    In many ways the nice thing about a TLR (except perhaps the Mamiya C) is that you don't get tempted to carry a lot of extra bits. My closeup lens set, a couple of filters, and a lens hood live in cases on the camera strap. Add film and a lightmeter and I'm off. No need to debate about needing a long or wide lens.
    I do agree with this. It is the same with my folding cameras as well, and it is a very nice feeling.

  10. #60
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Well yeah, that's part of why walking around being prepared to photograph while doing something else or just going for a walk with the Yashica is so much more pleasant than the Mamiya. I take a small shoulder bag that holds the camera, filters, lens hood, plenty of extra film and my Luna Pro SBC (not a small meter) and it's all still tiny, or just the loaded camera with lens hood and the meter in a (jacket) pocket. I COULD just carry the 645 with one back and lens, but even then it's much larger and heavier. Start taking the bag I keep it in with three 120 backs, the Polaroid back, several extra inserts, three lenses... the thing weighs more than my 4x5 kit with six film holders.



 

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