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  1. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by eddie View Post
    One of my favorite parts of doing a lot of shooting, on vacation, is having months of darkroom work to do upon my return. It effectively extends the experience, as the sights, sounds, aromas, come back to me while printing.
    What's nice about this is if you tend to print in the colder and darker months the photos can help lift the gloom
    Steve.

  2. #32

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    Streets and other public areas in Europe can be tight quarters. A wide-angle lens is indispensable. I'd travel as light as possible, 35mm with a 24mm and a 50mm lens, or an equivalent zoom - 24-70 would be perfect. When I last traveled in Europe, I found my 80-200 zoom lens almost useless - and heavy to pack around.

    I'd say format depends on your intended final use. How big do you intend to print? Do you have a specific project in mind? Color or B&W? If both, consider an extra body so you have both types available all the time. Film type - certainly up to you, but for hand-held work I always use IS0 400. This could bring up problems with airport X-rays unless you have all your film hand-inspected. A small, light tripod would be very handy.

  3. #33
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    I find the most useful lens for travelling my Canon FD 28-85 f4
    Ben

  4. #34

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    Keep in mind that some places it's hard to get film, even big cities. In 2008 as an example, last time I went, there was only one camera store in Budapest that carried 120 at all. So if yr going with MF, you'll have to carry a lot.

    --nosmok

  5. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by PDH View Post
    It would depend on how I am traveling and where I am staying.
    If I plan on renting a car and will in be the country side for landscapes I would travel with my Mamiya Press Universal with a Normal and Wide, and a 35mm with 4 primes, 24mm, 50mm, 105mm and 135 or 150 (Pentax 42mm) and a good quality point and shoot.

    If I plan on staying in a city and using public transportation and doing a lot of walking I would just take a 35mm with same primes and a point and shoot.

    Other option for light travel is Sigma SA 9 and Sigma SD 14 with 2 zooms 28 to 105, 70 to 210 and a 50mm prime.
    What the Hell is a SD 14??? Sigma makes lenses - Canon, Nikon, Pentax and the rest make cameras.

  6. #36

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    rb67 with a 65mm lens and a monopod.
    In my bag would also be a 127 and a 180mm lens. In my luggage would be a 150SF.
    Waist level finder.
    This is the kit I took to Paris a couple of years ago.
    These are all going to the Grand Canyon with me this summer as well as my 8x10. The rb goes on my hikes, the 8x10 for rim shots, probably at sunrise (if I am up) and sunset.

    tim in san jose
    Where ever you are, there you be.

  7. #37
    Peltigera's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pgomena View Post
    Streets and other public areas in Europe can be tight quarters. A wide-angle lens is indispensable. I'd travel as light as possible, 35mm with a 24mm and a 50mm lens, or an equivalent zoom - 24-70 would be perfect. When I last traveled in Europe, I found my 80-200 zoom lens almost useless - and heavy to pack around. <snip>
    Living in a very old European city (Lincoln) I find using a short telephoto lens indispensable. If you use a wide angle lens you will lose that feeling of being in tight quarters and make it look like a spacious American city. I frequently use a Tamron 90mm lens in the city which gives just enough visual compression to accentuate the 'tight quarters' feel.

  8. #38
    Peltigera's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Wiegerink View Post
    What the Hell is a SD 14??? Sigma makes lenses - Canon, Nikon, Pentax and the rest make cameras.
    Not really an appropriate suggestion for an APUG post, but if you have had enough of proper photography, the Sigma SD14 is not a bad choice.

  9. #39
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Wiegerink View Post
    What the Hell is a SD 14??? Sigma makes lenses - Canon, Nikon, Pentax and the rest make cameras.
    Sigma has been making camera bodies since the 1990s, so they have even made a few film cameras. Most were not terribly commercially successful, but not bad cameras either.

  10. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peltigera View Post
    Not really an appropriate suggestion for an APUG post, but if you have had enough of proper photography, the Sigma SD14 is not a bad choice.
    Actually I was just pulling PDH's leg a little bit, but I get "that look" whenever I tell somebody I use a DSLR and it's made by Sigma. People seem to forget Sigma made some darn nice film cameras also. I just got done packing for a week long fishing trip in Michigan's north country and in my bag are one Rollei 3.5E, one Sigma SD9, one Sigma SD14 w/ 24-70mm f2.8 - 70mm macro f2.8 - 70-200mm f2.8. Since I have the Rollei for B&W film I have left my Sigma SA-7n home. I also do agree with you that you better have a pretty good understanding of lighting and exposure with the Sigma cameras. I might slip my old folding Ikonta with uncoated Tessar in my pocket before I go. That's the problem with being a camera junkie, you have a hard time deciding which gear to take. I'll have fun whether the fish bite or not. JohnW

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