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  1. #41

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    That's the problem with being a camera junkie, you have a hard time deciding which gear to take.

    Boy do I know whats that's like..

  2. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by ToddB View Post
    That's the problem with being a camera junkie, you have a hard time deciding which gear to take.

    Boy do I know whats that's like..
    Yup! If I were sell off some of my cameras due to lack of use I could easily get rid of 75-80% of my collection. I'd still have 30 to 35 cameras left to play with and according to my wife that's still far to many. Many years ago I used to smoke and indulge heavily in alcoholic beverages, which might mean I've just swapped one addiction for another. I think my biggest problem is that I justify camera purchases by saying to myself and my better half, that I could have spent it on smokes and booze. Or I'll say look at all the money I've saved over the last 30 years by not indulging. What a vicious cycle we're in! Still, there are much worse things we could be doing. JohnW

  3. #43
    PDH
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Wiegerink View Post
    Actually I was just pulling PDH's leg a little bit, but I get "that look" whenever I tell somebody I use a DSLR and it's made by Sigma. People seem to forget Sigma made some darn nice film cameras also. I just got done packing for a week long fishing trip in Michigan's north country and in my bag are one Rollei 3.5E, one Sigma SD9, one Sigma SD14 w/ 24-70mm f2.8 - 70mm macro f2.8 - 70-200mm f2.8. Since I have the Rollei for B&W film I have left my Sigma SA-7n home. I also do agree with you that you better have a pretty good understanding of lighting and exposure with the Sigma cameras. I might slip my old folding Ikonta with uncoated Tessar in my pocket before I go. That's the problem with being a camera junkie, you have a hard time deciding which gear to take. I'll have fun whether the fish bite or not. JohnW
    I bought a SA 7 after my F3 was rippped off at LAX after 9 11, Southwest would not allow by bring my camera bag on board as carry on. I dithered for several years, for the most part I shoot MF and LF and still had my M42 gear but could not make up mind about an AF body. I found the SA 7 as a kit at a shopping mall and on whim bought it thinking it would do until I decided on either Canon or Nikon. Found that I really liked the SA 7 and bought a SA 9 and few pro level lens. Although I have added Pentex auto focus to my gear, for travel the SA 9 is still a choice for me. Light, has mirror lock up, shoots at about 4 FPS, auto bracket exposure. The auto foucs is not good for sports but good enough for travel. I find my self shooting less and less color film, finidng it on the road, getting it processed so I cheat with the SD 14.

  4. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by PDH View Post
    I bought a SA 7 after my F3 was rippped off at LAX after 9 11, Southwest would not allow by bring my camera bag on board as carry on. I dithered for several years, for the most part I shoot MF and LF and still had my M42 gear but could not make up mind about an AF body. I found the SA 7 as a kit at a shopping mall and on whim bought it thinking it would do until I decided on either Canon or Nikon. Found that I really liked the SA 7 and bought a SA 9 and few pro level lens. Although I have added Pentex auto focus to my gear, for travel the SA 9 is still a choice for me. Light, has mirror lock up, shoots at about 4 FPS, auto bracket exposure. The auto foucs is not good for sports but good enough for travel. I find my self shooting less and less color film, finidng it on the road, getting it processed so I cheat with the SD 14.
    That's the one thing I really like about the SA-7n is it's a light weight. My has the pink focus screen/mirror syndrome, but I live with it. I never did get a good explanation as to why they turn pink-O? I don't think the SA-9 had the problem, but I've never owned one so really don't know. I will say one thing about owning Sigma cameras where I'm from and that is you're probably the only Sigma camera owner within 150 miles or more. It gets kind of lonely! Oh, and I'm sorry for your loss and I always get very P.O.'d when somebody rips me off. I too, shoot very little 35mm anymore and find medium and large format more to my liking. Don't tell anyone here, but digital has pretty much replaced what little 35mm I did shoot. JohnW

  5. #45
    PDH
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Wiegerink View Post
    That's the one thing I really like about the SA-7n is it's a light weight. My has the pink focus screen/mirror syndrome, but I live with it. I never did get a good explanation as to why they turn pink-O? I don't think the SA-9 had the problem, but I've never owned one so really don't know. I will say one thing about owning Sigma cameras where I'm from and that is you're probably the only Sigma camera owner within 150 miles or more. It gets kind of lonely! Oh, and I'm sorry for your loss and I always get very P.O.'d when somebody rips me off. I too, shoot very little 35mm anymore and find medium and large format more to my liking. Don't tell anyone here, but digital has pretty much replaced what little 35mm I did shoot. JohnW
    Pink screen mirror syndrome? Dont what that is. My understanding is the the SA 7 and SA 9 are built on the same platform, only differnace is that he SA 9 has 1/8000 shutter speed and faster motor drive, but the SA9 uses a CR5 so there must be differances in the build as well. I think the mirror and screen are the same. Although a SA 7 was listed on Graigs list last year I have never any one else in Phoenix with a SA 7 or 9. I know a few folks who shoot Sigma SD 14 and SD 1s.

  6. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by PDH View Post
    Pink screen mirror syndrome? Dont what that is. My understanding is the the SA 7 and SA 9 are built on the same platform, only differnace is that he SA 9 has 1/8000 shutter speed and faster motor drive, but the SA9 uses a CR5 so there must be differances in the build as well. I think the mirror and screen are the same. Although a SA 7 was listed on Graigs list last year I have never any one else in Phoenix with a SA 7 or 9. I know a few folks who shoot Sigma SD 14 and SD 1s.
    I have had two SA7's and both have the pink screen/finder/mirror problem. One was much worse than the other so I sold it and kept the worst one. On mine it seems to start on the bottom and work its way up. It starts out as a light-pink color when looking through the finder and it seems to get worse with age. It's still usable, but gives most of the bottom half of the finder screen a very pink cast. Like I said, I have never found out what caused it, but it might be some weird gases or glue or............?
    I know of nobody in my area that uses either a Sigma film or digital camera. Now, there could be, but I just haven't run into them yet. JohnW

  7. #47

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    I would probably go with medium format camera. Rnagefinders are compact enough to carry 2 or 3 lenses without breaking your shoulder, but something like Contax 645 with the 80/2.0 lens would be nice too

    If I plan to shoot more - than my setup usually consists of Mamiya 6 with 3 lenses. Mamiya 7 could be even better (bit more bulky, but the same weight) as the built-in light meter is a bit more usable IMO. My most recent trip was to Romania and I carried the Mamiya 6 and a carbon tripod (which I used a lot).

    For more casual use I take just a TLR and a table-top tripod (Manfrotto).

    But also something like Fuji GA645, Bessa III or even Fuji GW690 (in particular for larger prints).

    If medium format would not be an option for some reason, I would probably turn to some non-analog solution (which I do not posses right now), for some reason 35mm film does not do it for me ...

  8. #48

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    A lot depends upon whether you plan to tour with others, or alone.

    If it's important to you to bring back pictures that will please you into your old age, and capture the flavour and essence of the location, try to travel alone.

    If the trip is primarily to enjoy the company of the local population, your personal comfort and mobility suggests travelling light: a TLR with a wide (50-65mm) lens, loaded with HP5 or TX;

    Touring on bicycle or motorcycle, by bus or train : MF/TLR with 50, 80 and 180mm, or (NOT and) 35mm SLR or RF with 24, 50 and 135mm.

    Travelling by car: 4X5 with 90, 150 and 360 TP, in addition to the above.

    Another personal favourite, maybe as a replacement for a wide-angle lens, is a HorizonT wide-angle camera. Surprisingly efficient, but an acquired taste.


    Travelling with a wife: iphone
    Last edited by barzune; 05-18-2013 at 07:38 PM. Click to view previous post history.

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