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  1. #21
    Andre Noble's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 250swb View Post
    You may agree with sveamarcus, but personally I think there is a world of difference between 'testing' a lens and actually using a lens...
    I once owned perhaps one of the most extensive Bronica SQai/PS system possible. Actually I should have said: "used the lenses, was not overly impresses during actual usage, then extensively tested the lenses for confirmation/explaination."
    Having said that the color contrast of these Bronica PS lenses was outstanding.
    Andre Noble, Beverly Hills California http://andrenoble.com/

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by 250swb View Post
    You may agree with sveamarcus, but personally I think there is a world of difference between 'testing' a lens and actually using a lens. I wouldn't dream of recommending, or criticising, something I hadn't used over a period of time. 'Testing' in my book is contrived comment, it doesn't relate to the world outside the camera shop window in most cases. He may have used a lab, or a sharp brick wall, but I'd take seriously the person that had lugged it up a mountain and had a genuine feeling for if it was worth the effort.
    You're making a lot of assumptions about me. By testing, I meant owning. Rather than using straw man arguments or ad hominems, why not discuss the topic at hand.

  3. #23

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    I looked intensely at the SQ system, but after a lot of soul searching realized I could just pack lunch for a month or so and afford a hasselblad instead.

  4. #24

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    I have ETR, SQ and GS-1 series cameras and lenses. The early 150/4 MC for the ETRs is supposed to be a weak performer but I like mine. In the SQ series I have the 150/4 PS and the earlier 150/3.5 S. Both are very good. The PS has better coating so in difficult lighting situations more care must be taken with the S. The 50/3.5 PS is very sharp. I don't see a big difference between the 80/2.8 S and the 80/2.8 PS. They are both very good. I have the 105/3.5 lenses for the ETRs and the SQs. Both are good but the main benefit is that they allow closer focusing for portraits. When Bronica went to the P series of lenses both were discontinued. Lately I have been shooting more with the GS-1s. I am using the 50, 65, 100 and 150 lenses. I wish they had closer focusing but they are all very good. The GS-1 seems easier to use hand held than other 6X7 SLRs. There are plenty of good lenses for 35mm use. There is also good 35mm film to go with them. The main advantage of a medium format camera/lens is that you don't have to enlarge as much. To make a minimally cropped 11X14 from a 35mm negative you have to enlarge 11X. The same size print from a 6X7 negative only has to be enlarged 5X. There are lenses for 35mm cameras which are sharper than those for medium format cameras but they are not more than twice as sharp. Even with Ektar 100 you will see a difference between enlarging the film 11X and enlarging it 5X. Cropping down to 6X4.5 from a square negative will make me enlarge just more than 6X to get the same 11X14. It all comes down to how large a print you need to make. Bronica GS-1 equipment is much less expensive than Hasselblad 6X6 equipment. Last week I got a GS-1 body with no crank or focusing screen but with the battery door for $17.16. I put on all of the necessary parts and the camera works as it should. I just bought a second GS-1 plain prism finder for $50. Now I have two working GS-1s. A third body needs a little work. With a GS-1 and a roll of Ektar 100 I can make prints as large as I like. I have been lucky because most of the Bronica equipment I have bought works well. When do I use the SQ cameras? Mostly when I want to carry something light: SQ-A body, 80/2.8, crank, waist level finder and back. I have a Speed Grip and prism finders for my SQ cameras but when I know I will be shooting verticals and using the oblong format I use an ETR or GS-1. I consider Bronicas the best bargain in used medium format SLR cameras.

  5. #25
    cliveh's Avatar
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    I don't know about modern Bronicas, but the last time I used one I thought I may need earplugs when pressing the shutter.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    I don't know about modern Bronicas, but the last time I used one I thought I may need earplugs when pressing the shutter.
    After the ECTL, Bronica designed cameras that used leaf shutter lenses.

    I heard a story about a wedding photographer who was shooting a wedding in church using an early Bronica with the focal plane shutter. The reverend made him quite shooting because of the loud shutter noise from the
    camera!

  7. #27
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    Okay, I'm a little behind on this topic, and the OP did say that he was probably just going to hang on to his Mamiya C330 and his 6 lenses, and Paramender 2, but I recently just forked over some dough for a nice little kit and I'll tell you why. As a caveat, I'm a former C22/C330 user, with Paramender. I apprenticed with a wedding/portrait photographer in the 90s who used an ETRS, so am familiar with Bronica basics.
    I'm just returning to film after a decade sojourn into a mostly digital world, and decided after buying a couple old folders that I wanted something for more serious photography. I considered Mamiya 645 Pro, Hasselblad, Bronica ETR, Rolleiflex 6000 series and of course the Contax 645. In the end I decided to keep my older 'fun' cameras (TLRs and folders) and to go with the Bronica SQ-A system. I bought 2 bodies with standard 80/2.8 lenses, a 120 and two 220 backs, a metered prism, a Pro4 filter holder/lens shade and a couple other bits for just under $500. Did I mention that included in the price was a Zenzanon S 40mm lens with caps and pristine glass? For that price I would have been lucky to get a 500C Hasselblad with lens and back. Luckily for me I live in a city with a remarkable camera repair man (Roger from CamTech Photo) who repairs Hasselblads, Bronicas, Mamiya, folders and large format lenses as his bread and butter. needless to say I send everything I buy on the Bay for a checkout, and everything checked out except one 220 back, which I got a partial refund for.
    With my basic setup I am able to do what I want for the most part. I suspect that I will spring for a portrait lens of some kind. Bronica lenses do not have the sharpness of the Hasselblad or Mamiya RZ offerings, however they are good enough for most purposes. Scanned properly, they can produce amazing images at 36" square and bigger.
    Yes, the backs can be a problem, but I did cussed this with Roger and he said $45 would allow him to overhaul a back to give years of worryfree service.
    So, what do I have? A pretty good system for general photography. I am able to eat and not have to worry about blowing my savings on Hassy lenses and gear. Having a sharper lens is no guarantee that your images will be superior. Edward Weston was nonchalant about the camera body and lenses he used for the most part, not being a devotee to technical image perfection like St. Ansel.
    Also, one last thing, which I will post and hope I don't regret it. The kids today, from Filmwasters, FPP and elsewhere love the sprocket film look that goes over well on Holga blogs and sites. I found out what my 220 backs will be doing; I'm converting them for 35mm sprocket photography. Sure, I hope to do work with this gear, and get paid for it if I can, but I also want to have fun.
    So you folks sitting on the fence, 220 backs sell for peanuts (until people read this article I suppose), and getting a basic SQ/SQ-A body with basic finder and 220 back can be had for very little. You can shoot 120 in a 220 back, but you can also shoot panorama style sprocket film.. which just seems like a whole bunch of fun to me.
    Sorry for being so long winded, but as a former C330 user as well, I have to say it is a great camera in a great system, with sometimes better lenses, but the Bronica SQ series will hold its own any day of the week.

    Bronica 220 back sprocket How-to
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/8626584...7631972143051/ (not mine)
    Last edited by dhosten; 08-26-2013 at 06:08 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: spelling

  8. #28
    Tony-S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dhosten View Post
    Bronica lenses do not have the sharpness of the Hasselblad or Mamiya RZ offerings, however they are good enough for most purposes.
    I've never shot a Hasselblad, but my Bronica GS-1 lenses superb.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony-S View Post
    I've never shot a Hasselblad, but my Bronica GS-1 lenses superb.
    My Bronica lenses are sharp enough for me too, but I was just going by the information provided by Chris Perez.

  10. #30
    Tony-S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dhosten View Post
    My Bronica lenses are sharp enough for me too, but I was just going by the information provided by Chris Perez.
    Those are resolution charts. Remember, "sharpness" is a function of two things - resolution and contrast. You can have high resolution lenses but with poor contrast they'll be less sharp. And vice-versa.

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