Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,222   Posts: 1,532,371   Online: 1079
      
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 32
  1. #11
    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    NYC
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,799
    Once you start going to larger formats, going wide gets pricey fast. I think the fuji gsw690 models start at like $500. Press cameras are cheaper, but very wide lenses are expensive. To go faster, you can also spring for a roll film back. And your final option is to go pinhole. The cheapest if you build it yourself, and order a nice laser cut pinhole. You can use sheet film, paper, or roll film depending on how you design it, and while designing it you can create one to go as wide as you want.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    St. Paul, MN
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    115
    Quote Originally Posted by Newt_on_Swings View Post
    Once you start going to larger formats, going wide gets pricey fast. I think the fuji gsw690 models start at like $500. Press cameras are cheaper, but very wide lenses are expensive.
    I think wide is really expensive on all formats- if you go to the extreme: for 6x9- the 35mm Rodenstock, it really isn't much more than any other super wide; if you needed that coverage on 35mm, consider that a comparable lens would be the nikon 13mm.

  3. #13
    Pioneer's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Elko, Nevada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    984
    Images
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by revdocjim View Post
    Oh yes... I guess I completely forgot about large format, which seems to always be in inches.
    And all my sheet film (even the new film being sold in Ilford's most recent annual sale) is dimension in inches. It is very, very close to 6x9 roll film but it is referred to as 2.25 x 3.25 inches. I guess it is just following the general large format trend.

  4. #14
    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    NYC
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,799
    Quote Originally Posted by LiamG View Post
    I think wide is really expensive on all formats- if you go to the extreme: for 6x9- the 35mm Rodenstock, it really isn't much more than any other super wide; if you needed that coverage on 35mm, consider that a comparable lens would be the nikon 13mm.
    I think 35mm is the cheapest out of all the ultra wides. I have a Sigma 14mm 3.5 AF lens in Nikon mount, its probably one of the most affordable. Looking at completed ebay listings, this lens ranges from $70-$350, with the majority of them ending around between $150-$200. That is pretty cheap to get into the super wide spectrum with a rectilinear lens.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Canada
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    16
    Quote Originally Posted by edcculus View Post
    Since I'm new to MF and LF photography, is there any advantage of a 2X3 (inch) press camera over a 4X5? ... Kind of seems to me that once you factor in the hassle of loading sheets, the size/weight etc, of that type of camera, you might as well spring for the 4X5 and have a much larger negative to boot?
    If you're using it as a hand-held press camera, e.g., focusing via a rangefinder or even estimating the focus, you can keep a 120 film back attached and avoid the hassle of loading sheets and you have a much smaller kit to carry. 120 film is pretty convenient to use, compared to sheets. If on the other hand you're always using it like a field or view camera, e.g. on a tripod and focusing via the ground glass, then you may as well use the larger camera.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,358
    Quote Originally Posted by revdocjim View Post
    Good grief! What's all this "inches nonsense" when talking about film formats? As long as we are in agreement about using metric for our focal lengths, how about doing the same for our frame dimensions? After all, when is the last time a camera manufacturer released a camera and talked about the frame dimension in inches? (Actually I can think of one modern example but will keep quiet about that for now)
    Well, there's reality and then there are poor approximations to reality. The poor approximations sometimes lead innocents astray.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,358
    Quote Originally Posted by Newt_on_Swings View Post
    I think 35mm is the cheapest out of all the ultra wides. I have a Sigma 14mm 3.5 AF lens in Nikon mount, its probably one of the most affordable. Looking at completed ebay listings, this lens ranges from $70-$350, with the majority of them ending around between $150-$200. That is pretty cheap to get into the super wide spectrum with a rectilinear lens.
    For the 35/4.5 Apo Grandagon's price, see http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...agon_Lens.html

    I usually shoot mine on 2x3 without a center filter, but on 6x12 (actual size 56 x 112), it needs one. For price, see http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...er_Filter.html

    The lenses you're thinking of barely cover 24 x 36.

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,358
    Quote Originally Posted by sbjornda View Post
    If you're using it as a hand-held press camera, e.g., focusing via a rangefinder or even estimating the focus, you can keep a 120 film back attached and avoid the hassle of loading sheets and you have a much smaller kit to carry. 120 film is pretty convenient to use, compared to sheets. If on the other hand you're always using it like a field or view camera, e.g. on a tripod and focusing via the ground glass, then you may as well use the larger camera.
    I dunno. As I said, I've used 2x3 Graphics for decades. I've had a 2x3 Cambo SC for a while, recently got a 4x5 Cambo SC to shoot 6x12. A 2x3 Graphic is smaller and lighter than a 2x3 Cambo, which is smaller and lighter than a hybrid Cambo (2x3 front standard, 4x5 rear) for shooting 6x12, which is smaller and lighter than a 4x5 Cambo.

    People don't talk much about viewers, but the Cambo SF-320 in-line viewing hood fits a 2x3 Graphic Graflok back and makes the camera much easier to use on tripod.

  9. #19
    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    NYC
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,799
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Fromm View Post
    For the 35/4.5 Apo Grandagon's price, see http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...agon_Lens.html

    I usually shoot mine on 2x3 without a center filter, but on 6x12 (actual size 56 x 112), it needs one. For price, see http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...er_Filter.html

    The lenses you're thinking of barely cover 24 x 36.
    Yea that's what I was saying in my earlier post, as you go to a larger format and get more coverage, the prices go way way up. Your lenses are 10x or more than the price the 35mm equivalent.

  10. #20
    culturesponge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    brit in southern california
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    63
    Quote Originally Posted by PDH View Post
    I have a Mamyia Universal with both 65 and 50mm lens. Overall the Fuji is newer, the Mamyia requires the use of vewfinder for wide angle, and the Fuji has a intergrated light meter, the Mamyia interchangeable backs. I would judge the Fuji to have an edge in lens quaility.
    we are lucky enough to have a Super 23 & Universal outift with 50mm, 75mm & f2.8 100mm lenses + also more recently a Fuji GSW690 III (65mm) & GW690 III (90mm) - the Fuji beats the Mamiya Press outfit hands down - it's so much more fluid to use on location & optically superior. but will keep the Mamiya breezeblock camera for tiltshifts & fuji polaroids.

    best
    alex

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin