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  1. #21
    Trond's Avatar
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    I have a Mamiya Universal system with lenses from 50mm - 150mm. All the lenses that I have are excellent performers, and in terms of sharpness, I can't imagine anything being sharper than the 75mm and 100mm 2.8 (but I don't have a another 6x9 system to compare it with). The 50mm is an excellent and sharp super wide lens. The 65mm is also good, not as sharp as the other lenses, but the images I take with it look good and it's very compact.

    The Mamiya Universal is part of a quite large camera system. The backs are very nice, and there is also a Polaroid back available. It is heavy and bulky, and the lack of any interlocks can be frustrating at first (resulting of lots of blank frames, double exposures, etc), but with a little experience it's actually quite nice to use.

    Trond

  2. #22
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    I have a Linhof Technika V 23b, which is another option--mainly for those times when I would really rather be using a larger camera, but can't for practical reasons. If you're looking to shoot landscapes, a camera with movements is a big advantage, because it allows you to control the position of the horizon while keeping the trees straight. Of course you can also control the plane of focus and do other things with a view camera, but just controlling the horizon and keeping the lines straight are basic to landscape photography.

    I also think it pays to move up in format when you want to go wide, because a small format won't be as good at rendering all the information that a wide lens can take in when you're going for the big landscape.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  3. #23
    toyotadesigner's Avatar
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    Nobody mentioned the Plaubel 69W proshift superwide. It's a 6x9 with rise and shift, a Mamiya Press roll film back (excellent film flatness) and a Schneider Super-Angulon 5.6/47mm which needs a center filter. Incredible camera with incredible results if you want to go wider than a Fuji GSW 690 III.
    Don't dream your life - live your dream.
    I'm using FILM because nature isn't made of squares.

  4. #24
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    I have a Fuji GSW 690. I think it's a perfect landscape camera. It has a wide sharp lens and the camera is relatively light. The disadvantage is the lens is not interchangeable.
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  5. #25
    Barry S's Avatar
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    The Fuji GSW690 II/III is a wonderful camera if you like the 6x9 format and can live with a fixed 65mm lens. I love the camera and appreciate the simplicity. The Mamiya Press cameras are part of a system with lots of lenses, backs, and accessories. If you're planning on building a system the Mamiya would be great, but if you just want 6x9 with a wide angle, the Fuji makes way more sense--being a lot more compact and lighter.

  6. #26

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    Fotoman 69 or dMax? I had a Fotoman 69 and it was a great camera, mine had a 47mm lens which I guess is about 21mm in 35mm terms. I'll probably get a Fotoman 45SPS soon, I think they make some really cool cameras for not a lot of money.

  7. #27

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    I have a Fuji GL 690 with interchangeable lenses, including the much adored 65 f/5.6 with matching finder. I use it as a wide angle and it feels about thee same as a 28mm on 35mm cameras. If you are interested in knowing more contact me by PM.

  8. #28

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    I have several Fujica 670 and 690 cameras and all the lenses, including the ultra rare 50/5.6 Fujinon.

    It is the equivalent of about 21* on a 35mm camera when fitted on the 6x9.

    It just so happens that one of these treasured rarities is for sale on that famous auction site right now!

    May be a once in a lifetime opportunity for someone.

    Good luck!

    Texsport

  9. #29
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbjornda View Post
    If you're using it as a hand-held press camera, e.g., focusing via a rangefinder or even estimating the focus, you can keep a 120 film back attached and avoid the hassle of loading sheets and you have a much smaller kit to carry. 120 film is pretty convenient to use, compared to sheets. If on the other hand you're always using it like a field or view camera, e.g. on a tripod and focusing via the ground glass, then you may as well use the larger camera.
    Roll film is not just (much) more convenient, and less expensive per shot, but it's pretty immune to dust on the film during exposure. Anyone who has ever shot large format knows what a huge advantage that can be (exception - people like Drew with lab grade clean rooms to load holders in!)

  10. #30

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    I love my Fuji GSW690, but I would not describe it as "relatively light." I have taken it hiking and by the end of the day I am sagging under the weight. That said, the results are nothing short of amazing (and worth putting up with the bulk and weight.)

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