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  1. #11

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    I agree with Nathan Tenny. A Mamiya 7 is probably your best bet but will cost you a fortune. Anything you buy is going to be a compromise.

    How about buying another 35mm camera for portability and a used 4x5 field camera for landscapes. You could even buy a medium format roll film back for the 4x5 if you wish for even more versatility.

  2. #12

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    Thanks for the thoughts so far, I'm at work and will have to look up all those cameras online after I get off. I've thought of going the 4x5 route too, but involves a lot more fussing between shots, doesn't it? I mean, I took my time with 35mm on a tripod and mirror lock up, cable release, etc - but isn't the LF world just an entire different beast? Hmmm...I wonder if I could get into that. I was thinking Adox CMS 20 on a 6x7 would be about perfect, but yeah...on a 4x5 sheet that would be just insane quality!

    I'm not so worried about weight, but bulk is a bit of an issue if I want to hike with it. Has to fit in a pack some how. I'll have to see how all these compare I guess. Thanks!

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jedidiah Smith View Post
    I was about to re-purchase the gear I used to have - Minolta Maxxum 7, 24-105 lens, vertical grip and maybe a 100-300 APO again.
    If you like having your option of lenses my advice is to build a system with a 6x6 or 6x4.5 format. I have a Rollei 6008i which shoots both of those formats. I will at some point buy a 6x9 camera and hopefully something like a 6x17 camera. The thing I like about my Rollei is it is a do everything camera.

    I see the beyond 6x6 world as a very nice add on to the 6x6 and below world. I also shoot 35mm for things like slides. You can get an excellent late model 35mm Canon body for <$100 and use your d*****l lenses with it. Less than $100 for a 35mm film setup? No brainer.

  4. #14

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    Alright, I started looking all these up. I came across a picture of a Bronica GS-1. Wow, I like the way it looks. And the lenses seem to match what I used to use with my 35mm setup - a 50mm (24mm equiv), a 100 or 110macro (50mm equiv) and a 150 (85mm equiv).

    Any thoughts on one of those for what I'm looking at doing? Thanks for your time.

  5. #15
    Dr Croubie's Avatar
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    Travelwide: $99 (or you could always go a real Graflex or Toyo or whatever Fieldcam body with a lot more movements for a lot more weight and probably a bit more money)
    Super Angulon 65mm f/8: $200-300 (or 90mm f/8 $150-250)
    Graflex 23 6x9 120-film back: $50
    Lightmeter: $100 (for a cheapish one, if you don't have one already)

    All I'm waiting on is the body (hopefully here before xmas) then I can go shoot me some nice wide landscapes...


    Or a P67 with 45mm lens, if you can find one without the problems mentioned in previous posts. Handles a lot more like a 35mm, but from my limited experiences with them P67s are *heavy* beasts (hell, I don't even like lugging my Kiev60 tank around too much, and P67 are heavier than them)
    An awful lot of electrons were terribly inconvenienced in the making of this post.

  6. #16
    cjbecker's Avatar
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    I think the Pentax 67 fills the requirement very well.

    The hasselblad is my choice though.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Most reasonable cost? Koni-Omega

    They aren't small or light, and you have to factor in the cost of having Greg Weber service them for you, but their quality is high.
    Let me second that - as long as it's in good shape the Koni-Omega is a brilliant camera. But it's my second-tier 6x7, after a Graflex Century Graphic with an RH10 rollfilm back. I have the Zeiss 100 lens, and it makes me giggle every time I see that detail coming out of such a small box.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jedidiah Smith View Post
    Thanks for the thoughts so far, I'm at work and will have to look up all those cameras online after I get off. I've thought of going the 4x5 route too, but involves a lot more fussing between shots, doesn't it? I mean, I took my time with 35mm on a tripod and mirror lock up, cable release, etc - but isn't the LF world just an entire different beast? Hmmm...I wonder if I could get into that. I was thinking Adox CMS 20 on a 6x7 would be about perfect, but yeah...on a 4x5 sheet that would be just insane quality!

    I'm not so worried about weight, but bulk is a bit of an issue if I want to hike with it. Has to fit in a pack some how. I'll have to see how all these compare I guess. Thanks!
    A big thing about large format is that you can tilt your lens and change your plane of focus so you get everything sharp in your landscape photographs. Yes, it does take a little longer to set up a view camera but most people (including me) feel that the extra time spent creates more "keepers" at the end of the day. Yes, a 4X5 folding field camera will easily fit into a backpack with plenty of room to spare. A lot of photographers hike with them.

    If you are interested in large format then check out the home page on the Large Format Photography Forum for a wealth of free information.

  9. #19
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    The trouble with large format that is quite noticeable is it's the first format to receive the chop in availability of films; it's an ongoing annoyance that affects all formats, but 4x5 is not particularly well catered for despite obvious enthusiasm for and dedication to it in art, studio and landscape photography (in many disciplines replaced by digital, which I feel is inferior and insulting to the art form, not that we can do much about it, even as a vociferous minority). It is a testing format to use that requires time, patience and a methodical, measured approach, with a good deal of metering nouse about you (without that singularly important aspect LF is not the choice; learn advanced metering with a manual camera and move up and up as skills and the amount of time you wish to devote to it increase). All things else being equal, you must be hellbent on producing the very best images you can from the oeuvre you have specialised in (this holds though for a lot of serious, studious photography in any format from 35mm right up to ULF and beyond). It is observed that it will be the first format to disappear, quicker than MF, 35mm and even ULF because there is not a big nor growing market to sustain it; creative peeps take LF papers and chop them down to 4x5 size, and a great many are in the B&W league, where LF had its foundations more than a century ago. The important thing here is to get your hands on whatever you are comfortable and competent with and go out there and shoot film like there's no tomorrow!
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  10. #20

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    A reasonable solution in terms of functionality (but not price unfortunately...) would be the Linhof Technika 6x9; light and compact (compared to a RB or a Pentax 67), some lens adjustments for perspective and dof control, high quality of the camera and the lenses.
    "The problem with photography is that it only deals with appearances." Duane Michals

    "A photograph is a secret of a secret. The more it tells you the less you know." Diane Arbus

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