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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by James-EG View Post
    The camera comes with the speed grip and has started at £0.99 without a reserve but all the others on eBay are around the £200-300 price, but there are a couple around £100 without the speed grip too. From everyone else's replies, would the 6x4.5 format be good for me to start with?

    Thanks, James
    Despite what some snobs say 6x4.5 is a big jump up in negative size from 35mm. In my experience 6x4.5 is a great place to start. It is the lightest of the commonly available MF SLR equipment. Also unless you print square you are essentially shooting 6x4.5ish with a 6x6 camera. So to get a rectangular size advantage over 6x4.5 you have to jump up to 6x7... and that is a whole other world filled with rangerfinders and SLRS that are better kept firmly on a tripod.

    The Bronica ETRSi is a good entry point because you can get it for a reasonable price and if you decide you want to upgrade you can sell it easily enough without taking too much of a hit.

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Noble View Post
    Despite what some snobs say 6x4.5 is a big jump up in negative size from 35mm. In my experience 6x4.5 is a great place to start. It is the lightest of the commonly available MF SLR equipment. Also unless you print square you are essentially shooting 6x4.5ish with a 6x6 camera. So to get a rectangular size advantage over 6x4.5 you have to jump up to 6x7... and that is a whole other world filled with rangerfinders and SLRS that are better kept firmly on a tripod.

    The Bronica ETRSi is a good entry point because you can get it for a reasonable price and if you decide you want to upgrade you can sell it easily enough without taking too much of a hit.
    Thanks Noble, I think I will go for a ETRSi, I found a couple which hopefully will stay at lower prices!
    James

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  3. #23

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    The 6x4.5 and 6x9 come closest to the aspect ratio of the 35mm that you're used to. You may find composing the square 6x6 format challenging. I've been playing with it for about 3 years and am only now getting results I like. That being said, it's been a really enjoyable experience. I have been using a 1948 Zeiss and a Mamiya C33. They are both 6x6, but are about as different as 2 cameras can be. No other tlr can match the flexibility of the Mamiya C series and they are very high quality in design and manufacturing. They are pretty heavy to carry around, but can be had at bargain prices. The Zeiss design goes back to the early 30's and has a charm of it's own. Be careful - once you experience MF you may never want to go back to 35mm.
    “You seek escape from pain. We seek the achievement of happiness. You exist for the sake of avoiding punishment. We exist for the sake of earning rewards. Threats will not make us function; fear is not our incentive. It is not death that we wish to avoid, but life that we wish to live.” - John Galt

  4. #24

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    For the budget conscious medium format SLR shooter I recommend these cameras:

    For 645 the Bronica ETR series which you are looking at. My first medium format camera was an ETRsi. Nice modular camera at a budget price today on the used market.

    For 6x6 the Bronica SQ series. If you like square this is a great way to go. If you are going to crop all your images to rectangles then save some money and buy the ETR series.

    For 6x7 look at the Mamiya RB67 and the Pentax 6x7. These cameras have fine optics and produce nice large negatives. The downside is that they are bigger and heavier which may or may not matter to you.


    I have also owned Bronica EC's and an S2a. They are fine cameras with some excellent optics at a budget price but like someone mentioned earlier they are getting pretty old.

  5. #25

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    Thanks Alan, I have now pretty much settled on the Bronica ETRSi, as you said it seems like a good one to start out with, and being on a budget I can't really consider anything like the SQ series. Also the ETRSi is a fairly recent camera compared to others.
    I think the ETRSi would be best for me right now, there are a lot of lenses and accessories around so I think it would be the most logical camera that has been suggested for a beginner like me!

    Thanks again
    James

    My 500px Profile --> http://500px.com/James_EG

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by James-EG View Post
    So my question is, what camera should I be looking to trying to buy? I would love to get a camera in the style of the Hasselblad cameras but obviously they are far too expensive ...
    Not too expensive, rather the costs make you wait longer until you have money to buy the next lens. But it is worth it. I inherited a Mamiya C-330 with three lenses and every device known to man for it, including the paraminder and prism. I sold all of that to buy a Hasselblad. That was the best thing I ever did photographically. I never looked back.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noble View Post
    How much?

    I would consider a complete kit a camera body, 75mm PE lens, manual speed grip, 120 back, and a prism finder.

    The 75/2.8 E-II lens is excellent. It came after the MC lens and before the PE. I have both the E-II and PE 75's and haven't seen any difference, though they are not the same optically, as is sometimes claimed. The E-II is around 25 to 30% less expensive, though both are pretty cheap these days. The PE has half-stop detents, but myself I prefer full-stop detents, so for me that's not important. The E-II also has the full-metal construction of all the lenses before PE, but the use of plastic on PE lenses was so well done that I don't think it detracts.


    About lens designations. There are three basic designations for ETR lenses: E, E-II and PE. MC stands for multi-coated and was not the actual series designation, but because the lenses say MC on them and not E, that became the default designation. It works OK because all MC lenses are E series. Bronica has claimed that the "MC" was eventually dropped from their E-series lenses, as multicoating had become nearly universal, but I have never seen a lens other than E-II or PE without MC on it. From what others have told me, only the 105/3.5 E lacked the MC designation.

    About E lenses: The original lenses had silver front sections, and there was a basic assortment of five lenses. Later E lenses had black front sections and were optically different, and there were more: seven E prime lenses, two E-II primes, two E zooms made by Schneider, an E tilt/shift 55mm made by Schneider, and 2X teleconverter. The two E-II lenses were the 75/2.8 E-II and the 500/8 E-II.
    Later lenses are all PE, except that Bronica offered both the 500/8 E-II and the newer 500/8 PE. The 500 PE was top-notch optically, but was much more expensive than the E-II (which was pretty expensive itself), so they offered both (kind of like Canon's "L" lenses and their regular lenses). There were some new focal lengths in the PE line including a fisheye, different zooms, plus a 1.4X teleconverter.

    The MC lenses are still very good, other than the aforementioned original 75/2.8 with 58 mm filter thread and the 150/4.
    In my experience I have seen little difference between the 150/3.5 MC and the 150/PE, except some flare reduction in the PE. I have both the MC and PE 40's, and while there is some improvement near the edges and somewhat less flare with the PE, I like the look of pictures from the 40 MC a lot.
    So, what I'm saying is, the MC series is no slouch. If money is an issue, don't hesitate to buy MC instead of PE. They are considerably less expensive in most focal lengths. Especially for someone getting their feet wet to see if they like medium format, having the latest glass is not that important. I bought MC lenses (and a 75mm E-II) when I was just wanting to see if I liked 645 format or even medium format in general. If I had not gotten any PE lenses other than later lenses available only in PE, I still would have some really nice results.
    Last edited by lxdude; 05-31-2013 at 10:25 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  8. #28

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    Thanks for that information lxdude. Also Sirius Glass, I see what you mean but I still don't think it would be worth me trying to buy a Hasselblad and getting top-of-the-range equipment when all I am interested in so far is trying out MF, especially since I am on a tight budget. Also I don't think it would really be worth it buying Hasselblad then finding out that MF isn't for me.

    Thanks again
    James

    My 500px Profile --> http://500px.com/James_EG

  9. #29

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    Sorry to post in here again but I didn't want to start a new thread for this small question, I found a Bronica ETRSi starting at a good price for me and it comes with two lenses (75mm f/2.8 and 105mm f/2.8), however when I emailed the seller he said that the lenses have fungus in them, is it difficult to clean them?

    Thanks
    James

    My 500px Profile --> http://500px.com/James_EG

  10. #30
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    James, skip it. You have better things to do with your life. A better camera will come along and want to go home with you.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

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