Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,814   Posts: 1,581,598   Online: 883
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. #1
    ambaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Missouri, US
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    567

    I wonder what this button does?

    Ok, I downloaded a manual for the Pentax 67, but it does not show the silver doo-hickey on the left. The hoojie on the right controls the frame counter for 120 or 220 load, but I have no idea what the other one does. There does appear to be a pin that keeps it in the current position, which must be pressed to move it.

    However I am not a fan of pressing an unknown button on a camera I do not want to break. Can any buddy help me on this?

    Thanks!



    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails ImageUploadedByTapatalk HD1370217152.832502.jpg  

  2. #2
    AgX
    AgX is offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    9,031
    Only part of the model 67 cameras got this button....

  3. #3
    lxdude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Redlands, So. Calif.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,751
    Are you sure the one on the right is a hoojie? I thought Pentax stopped using hoojies back about 1961.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  4. #4
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Vic., Australia.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,681
    Images
    15
    Factory-fitted multi-exposure lever. RARE.
    It's on mine. In the camera's hey day, owners could return the 67 to a Pentax service centre and this multi-exposure facility would be fitted. Many cameras came with it as an additional feature, often sought after even now for 'layered' imaging interpretations.

    Push in pin, turn lever left until M appears. Fire. No wind on until pin is disengaged.
    “The photographer must determine how he wants the finished print to look before he exposes the negative.
    Before releasing the shutter, he must seek 'the flame of recognition,' a sense that the picture would reveal
    the greater mystery of things...more clearly than the eyes see."
    ~Edward Weston, 1922.

  5. #5
    ambaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Missouri, US
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    567
    Quote Originally Posted by lxdude View Post
    Are you sure the one on the right is a hoojie? I thought Pentax stopped using hoojies back about 1961.
    I think you are thinking of the thing-a-ma-jig. Hoojies weren't discontinued until 88.

    Thank you all for the info.

    I don't believe I have ever done a multiple exposure image. Guess I should try one some day.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Woodland, WA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    57
    Don't press it. It might reset the world and I'm too old to start over!

  7. #7
    winger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Page County, IA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,497
    Images
    47
    I don't believe I have ever done a multiple exposure image. Guess I should try one some day.
    I'd had my P645N for about 10 years before I tried some - lots of fun and works easily.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Southern USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,124
    Agent 99: "Don't push that button Max!"
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  9. #9
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Vic., Australia.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,681
    Images
    15
    Try a multiexposure (3 or 4) of a river lined by vegetation and a very light breeze. The effect is surreal, almost painterly. Remember to set your film in use to a higher EI on account of multiple exposures.
    “The photographer must determine how he wants the finished print to look before he exposes the negative.
    Before releasing the shutter, he must seek 'the flame of recognition,' a sense that the picture would reveal
    the greater mystery of things...more clearly than the eyes see."
    ~Edward Weston, 1922.

  10. #10
    mweintraub's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    630
    Ah. My first thought seeing it was that it was a battery check like I've seen on older Minoltas (XE series).

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin