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  1. #11
    mindthemix's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbjornda View Post
    Lovely shots. Which lens? Did you crop much? Thanks for posting.
    The lens was Pentax 67 105mm F/2.4 and no cropping.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Wiegerink View Post
    I'd say by the looks of the first roll shots that you're well on your way. I'd love to have a 67II, but since I have a couple of nice 6X7's and money is an object, I'll just have to be happy. Besides, a camera is only a "light-tight box" anyway. What's important is what you stick on that light-tight box. I'll just keep putting my Pentax glass on my old Pentax light-tight boxes, but if I should come by a 67II cheap I might just have to upgrade one of those other light-tight boxes. The nice thing about the 6x7 format and the great Pentax glass is that I have no problem cranking out beautiful 16x20's with very little effort. Of course my Rollei or Hasselblad can too, but that's a different story for another day. I have never compared the 67II to a 67 or 6X7, but some say it's easy to handle and lighter???? Have fun and enjoy your new toy. Oh, great price also! JohnW
    Thanks for your feedback John! I'm more than happy with the P67, I love my Rolleicord and Olympus OM-1n too but this is a completely different experience. I'm bringing the camera wherever I go. My lovely fatty girlfriend!

  3. #13
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    The film advance "problem" is a weakness of design. It's plastic-against-metal and does wear out over time, albeit not helped by aggressive winding. Pentax makes a point of winding on in one smooth continuous and firm stroke, no jerking or yanking or broken stroke. There are many tiny moving parts in that mechanism and just one needs to break before there is no winding action at all — there is so much interdependence under the skin. Somewhere online is an Engineering and Service Manual for the Pentax 6x7 and 67 bodies which gives you an idea what service folk were up against. The winding mechanism weakness is purported to have been addressed in the modernised (67ii) bodies. As with everything, how you treat it will determine how well you service it. It's a nice kit indeed. The 55mm f4 is the absolute standout in what you have. The 67ii will likely make a better job of exposures shot with a polariser; with the 6x7 and 67 bodies, polarised shots are best manually metered.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
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  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    The film advance "problem" is a weakness of design. It's plastic-against-metal and does wear out over time, albeit not helped by aggressive winding. Pentax makes a point of winding on in one smooth continuous and firm stroke, no jerking or yanking or broken stroke. There are many tiny moving parts in that mechanism and just one needs to break before there is no winding action at all — there is so much interdependence under the skin. Somewhere online is an Engineering and Service Manual for the Pentax 6x7 and 67 bodies which gives you an idea what service folk were up against. The winding mechanism weakness is purported to have been addressed in the modernised (67ii) bodies. As with everything, how you treat it will determine how well you service it. It's a nice kit indeed. The 55mm f4 is the absolute standout in what you have. The 67ii will likely make a better job of exposures shot with a polariser; with the 6x7 and 67 bodies, polarised shots are best manually metered.
    I agree with all the above. When I was in my camera dealing days the main problem I would see with 67 and 6X7 Pentax cameras that people wanted to swap/trade/sell was the battery power situation or next inline was the wind problem. Knock on wood, I have never had a problem with either of my bodies, but one does and has had from the day I bought it, a slight "click" noise at the end of the winding stroke. It has no effect on spacing, but it always bothers me. Knowing that makes me be well aware to advance in one long smooth stroke. I don't know what the last version of the 55mm is like, but if it is better than my second version it must be outstanding 'cause the second version I have is very, very good. Truth is I haven't run into any "dogs" in all the lenses I have and I really haven't heard of to many people complain about bad lenses or worse yet, lens variation. I guess Pentax had a good QC program. I bet in a very short while you'll be adding more lenses and if you watch they do turn up with very fair prices also. Have fun, JohnW

  5. #15
    mindthemix's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    The film advance "problem" is a weakness of design. It's plastic-against-metal and does wear out over time, albeit not helped by aggressive winding. Pentax makes a point of winding on in one smooth continuous and firm stroke, no jerking or yanking or broken stroke. There are many tiny moving parts in that mechanism and just one needs to break before there is no winding action at all — there is so much interdependence under the skin. Somewhere online is an Engineering and Service Manual for the Pentax 6x7 and 67 bodies which gives you an idea what service folk were up against. The winding mechanism weakness is purported to have been addressed in the modernised (67ii) bodies. As with everything, how you treat it will determine how well you service it. It's a nice kit indeed. The 55mm f4 is the absolute standout in what you have. The 67ii will likely make a better job of exposures shot with a polariser; with the 6x7 and 67 bodies, polarised shots are best manually metered.
    Tonight I will develop y first roll with the 55mm F4 lens and I'll post my keepers. As for the stroke and doing the Pentax way; one firm and smooth stroke to prevent any damage.

    Thanks for the great feedback

  6. #16
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    Pentax 55mm F/4
    HP5 400 (expired 2006)
    Kodak HC-110 - Dilution 1:49 Time 8 Minutes @75F
    Handheld 1/60
    Click image for larger version. 

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  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevebarry View Post
    looking good. Are you hand holding it? If so how do you find the sharpness?
    Thanks Steve. All shoot were handholding the camera. I'm learning on how the camera delivers in different situations and adjust the technique based on the keepers. I adjusted the camera strap to the length were it works really well as a tripod. I carry the camera on my left side with the strap resting on my right shoulder. I just grab the camera with my right hand to the eye level, and the strap locks perfectly. I use my left palm as a base while focusing. I'm sure I'm doing something wrong but it works great for me.

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