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  1. #61
    TheToadMen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blockend View Post
    Folders are the only way to carry a roll film camera 'on spec'. I often carry two ZI Nettars, colour and mono, one in each coat pocket. Do that with a pair of RB67s and you'd need an osteopath.
    That's why I'm thinking of getting me a Kodak Retina IIa.
    "Have fun and catch that light beam!"
    Bert from Holland
    my blog: http://thetoadmen.blogspot.nl
    my Linkedin pinhole group: http://tinyurl.com/pinholegroup


    "I enjoy vintage cameras as “users,” rather than imprisoning them in some display case"

    My favorite cameras: Mamiya C330f, Nikon S2, Hasselblad SWC, Fuji GSW690 II, Leica SL, Leica M7, Russian FKD 18x24, Bronica SQ-B and RF645, Rolleiflex T, Nikon F4s, Olympus Pen FT, Agfa Clack and my pinhole cameras.

  2. #62

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheToadMen View Post
    That's why I'm thinking of getting me a Kodak Retina IIa.
    I still have my Retina IIa, but don't know why, since I mostly shoot 120 now. If I want a little carry 35mm it's usually one of my Minox 35's or a Rollei 35T, but that's not very often anymore. I LIKE BIG NEGATIVES! If you want something easy to carry, really good lens and a fairly cheap purchase price then go for something like an Ikonta or Zeiss Nettar. I have both and find them easy on the pocket in more ways than one. I have several with coated Tessar, coated Novar, uncoated Tessar and uncoated Novar. I like them all, but the later Nettar with coated Novar and flash sync is a real sleeper. I just bought a late Ikonta 523/16 with a red "T" coated Opton Tessar, but haven't tried it out yet. If it is like the Opton Tessar on the Super Ikonta I'll be very happy. The Super Ikonta cameras are excellent, but heavier than I want in my pocket so I forgo the rangefinder for the lighter weight Ikonta. I have no problem guesstimating range with the simpler Ikonta's. I think bow hunting has helped me out in that department since it's very critical to know the correct distance before you let an arrow fly. There are also many Agfa/Ansco folders too, but watch out for pinholes in the bellows. I rather pay just a little more for the Nettar or Ikonta since they usually have better quality bellows. If you have more money you can move up the ladder, but any of the above can give professional results, but remember, a bigger negative helps in that department also. Absolutely nothing wrong with the Retina IIa's lens, but like I said earlier, "I LIKE BIG NEGATIVES". JohnW

  3. #63

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    Love my ETRS fro walking around but you'll miss the bigger negative when printing.
    Anyone can make a Digital print, but only a photographer can make a photograph.

  4. #64

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    Quote Originally Posted by paul ron View Post
    Love my ETRS fro walking around but you'll miss the bigger negative when printing.
    Yes, I sold a Mamiya M645 1000S with AE prism finder and 80mm f1.9 lens that was just like carrying a slightly bigger Canon AE1 35mm camera. Just great for easy, fast shooting and you didn't even get tired from lugging it around. Of course the reason I sold it was I don't much care for the negative size. I will use 6x6, but really don't think things start singing until you get to 6x7. I use a Pentax 6x7outfit the most, but it sure doesn't fit in your pocket very easy. I have notice old folders are starting to go up a tad in price so others must be thinking the same as us. JohnW

  5. #65

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    Quote Originally Posted by John Wiegerink View Post
    Yes, I sold a Mamiya M645 1000S with AE prism finder and 80mm f1.9 lens that was just like carrying a slightly bigger Canon AE1 35mm camera. Just great for easy, fast shooting and you didn't even get tired from lugging it around. Of course the reason I sold it was I don't much care for the negative size. I will use 6x6, but really don't think things start singing until you get to 6x7. I use a Pentax 6x7outfit the most, but it sure doesn't fit in your pocket very easy. I have notice old folders are starting to go up a tad in price so others must be thinking the same as us. JohnW
    I'll tout the Mamiya 7 again, its a great camera, if I could afford two I would so I didn't have to switch lenses so much, but it's a great camera, lighter than my Canon 5D and smaller too(except maybe the box part in the front, but it's relatively the same size then) and the images are so crisp!

    Folders are nice, but a pain to focus...

  6. #66

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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    I'll tout the Mamiya 7 again, its a great camera, if I could afford two I would so I didn't have to switch lenses so much, but it's a great camera, lighter than my Canon 5D and smaller too(except maybe the box part in the front, but it's relatively the same size then) and the images are so crisp!

    Folders are nice, but a pain to focus...
    Oh yes the Mamiya 6 and 7 are great and I almost owned a Mamiya 7 shortly after they first came out, decided to just use what I had at the time since the price was just a little high then. I was using a Fuji 6x9 with the 90mm and the Fuji 645S with 60mm and didn't see much gain. Plus, I was not thrilled with the close-up capability of either the Mamiya 6&7 or the Fuji's, but those Fuji lenses were first rate. Yes, the old folders have there slight drawbacks, but price usually isn't one of the drawbacks. If I were made of money I can think of many things I would "rather" have, but I'm not. If I were back to making a living off photography it wouldn't be with a 75 to 80 year old folder that's for sure. JohnW

  7. #67

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    Quote Originally Posted by John Wiegerink View Post
    Oh yes the Mamiya 6 and 7 are great and I almost owned a Mamiya 7 shortly after they first came out, decided to just use what I had at the time since the price was just a little high then. I was using a Fuji 6x9 with the 90mm and the Fuji 645S with 60mm and didn't see much gain. Plus, I was not thrilled with the close-up capability of either the Mamiya 6&7 or the Fuji's, but those Fuji lenses were first rate. Yes, the old folders have there slight drawbacks, but price usually isn't one of the drawbacks. If I were made of money I can think of many things I would "rather" have, but I'm not. If I were back to making a living off photography it wouldn't be with a 75 to 80 year old folder that's for sure. JohnW
    What got me back to film was a tag sales 1910-1920's Kodak autographic folder. Cost me $20 with bargaining, and found these 120 "medium format" rolls could be obtained, I was fascinated! 2 years later and I've spent probably 5,000-10,000 on film equipment and film etc, its almost an addiction. But for someone that only makes $30,000/year, it's a lot of money, so remember that getting a cheapy could lead you to more


    ~Stone | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk

  8. #68
    JDP
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheToadMen View Post
    Hi,
    I didn't read al the posts in this thread, so it may already be suggested, but did you consider a Bronica RF-645? It's a fine camera with excellent glass and easy to carry & use. I'll take it with me if I don't want to carry my Bronica SQ-B and it is even usable as a point & shoot camera. It has a coupled light meter.
    Certainly second this comment. For light travel it combines top quality optics (as good as anything out there), 6x4.5 format, and three interchangeable lenses (45, 65 and 100 or 135mm). It is my most used camera. It is the smallest and lightest of its kind, I believe.

  9. #69

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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    What got me back to film was a tag sales 1910-1920's Kodak autographic folder. Cost me $20 with bargaining, and found these 120 "medium format" rolls could be obtained, I was fascinated! 2 years later and I've spent probably 5,000-10,000 on film equipment and film etc, its almost an addiction. But for someone that only makes $30,000/year, it's a lot of money, so remember that getting a cheapy could lead you to more


    ~Stone | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    I couldn't agree more! More is better, right? I'm now on a "fixed income" and money isn't flowing in like it used to, but I still buy an occasional camera if the price is fair and it's what I want. Now, for my wife it's a different story. Less is better! She wants to audition me for that crazy Hoarder show on TV! Can you believe that? I just tell her she'll be sitting good when I croak 'cause she can sell all, what she calls junk, for a good price. I just hope she's smart enough not to call Goodwill. JohnW

  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by omaha View Post
    ...I like the mojo of the TLR. I'm curious though, the Rollei cameras are going for a hefty premium to the others. Is there a functional reason for that, or is that just "collector value"?
    Rolleiflex has a well deserved reputation for sharpness and it is worth the premium price. At just under 3 pounds, it is a great camera for walking around or traveling with. Even if you include a carbon fiber tripod it is still easy to take along.

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