Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,224   Posts: 1,532,655   Online: 875
      
Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 45
  1. #11
    hdeyong's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Central Canada and Southern France
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    282
    Can you get a used underwater housing for a moderately priced MF? If they can keep out water at 30 ft, they must be able to keep out the dust.

  2. #12
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    SE Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,539
    Images
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by PtJudeRI View Post
    Pentax 67?? Pretty tank-ish.

    Burning Man is hardly the place for art-quality photographs, I can tell you. Australians have been there and described is as "full scale debauchery".
    The 67 (all versions) are prone to the ingress of dust, dirt and moisture. Burning Man is held in extremely harsh, dry environment. People have left the digimons in the sun there (got up from their chair, leaving the camera sitting on it...) and the camera has been turned to jelly! Though 35mm might be off your radar, but it would mean more shots per roll if that matters, a built-in meter and less changing of film which will only increase, dramatically, the risk of that appalling dust entering the camera. Any of the 'old guard' film cameras like the Olympus OMs, Nikons FE, FA will do the job. But you really need to concentrate on how to protect the camera in use, not just when it is not being used. The all-pervading fine white dust gets into everything, everything (even food, water). Take whatever camera you have and mollycoddle it, storing it in an airtight container. In that place you're going to need to look after yourself just as much as everything else you take there (theft if rife).
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  3. #13
    Bill Burk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    3,195
    Images
    46
    I spent three days on "the playa" a few weeks back with a different kind of crowd... I brought my 4x5 Newton Nu-Vue and kept it in a simple "Jansport" backpack. In the lunch-type cooler I had Ziploc bags with the Grafmatic, 2 lenses for the 4x5, Spotmatic F spare body (never came out of the Ziploc), 35mm film, 135mm lens (never used it). Around my neck the whole time, ES-II with 50mm and yellow filter. I only used the 4x5 for 6 shots. The rest was 35mm.

    Sure things were dusty, but it had rained the week before and there were only a fraction of the people you will have, so not a huge amount of kicked up dust airborne...

    A vintage folder like your Mamiya 6 is probably a good bet. You know what to expect, sure dust will get into it but you probably can minimize it by keeping it behind a shirt or in a protective bag when not actively shooting.

  4. #14
    adelorenzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Whitehorse, Yukon
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    514
    My Pentax 645NII has been mountain biking, hiking, rafting, xc-skiing and snowshoeing. I've shot in all conditions from rain to dust to being as cold as -40. I take no special precautions other than a padded case or a drybag. So on the whole I would say it is a pretty skookum rig.

    But not sure about the extreme dust and other aspects of Burning Man. That sounds like camera death to me. I'd probably hit the thrift store for a bag of cheap film cameras and just have fun with 'em. Either that or buy a couple of old land cameras and bring a tote full of Fuji instant peel-apart film.

  5. #15
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    SE Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,539
    Images
    15
    Good advice too. I reckon disposable cameras would be the bomb really. None of my friends' cameras (one of which was a Linhof) came back from that place unharmed (the Linhof had dust inside the bellows and incredibly, inside the 65mm lens). The extremely fine dust is airborne all the time from the movement of a thousand, thousand pairs of feet and dancing. No escape; if it's hard on humans, it is hard on cameras. Google picture of Burning Man (BTW, in Australia we have a smaller event called Burning Seed), and you might see the frightening spectacle of a storm whipping around — among other confronting scenes. To be sure, I wouldn't bother taking any snazzy camera there. Maybe a Nikonos or something sealed would be good.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  6. #16

    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    10
    Funny you mention an old Land Camera and Fuji peel-apart...I happen to have a couple working Automatic's I was going to bring to take peel-apart with to gift to people =D

    On the other side, I do have a Minolta X-700 which works fine, but 35mm just doesn't seem to do it for me the way 120 does. Even though I can get a Pentax 645N for $300+ with lens, I probably won't, at least not to go to Burning Man. I was more curious what people thought about the survivability of some of the newer 'older' MF cameras that have more features.

    One thing I'm a little disappointed in is the most/all of the 645 bodies are focal plane shutters rather than leaf shutters in the lens I know there are a few lenses out there that you can find that do have a leaf shutter, but it's still not the same. It's funny, I'm so used to leaf shutters in my film bodies that a focal plane shutter seems weird.

  7. #17
    chuck94022's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Los Altos, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    602
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    10
    If you are considering a Holga, then clearly medium format resolution is not the driving principle behind your decision. Not to be said on this forum, but methinks you should GoPro and be there.

    But if that doesn't cut it, I'd hack together a very simple pinhole camera and expose on 4x5 sheet, or cut sections of 120 or 35mm roll film. You'll need a dark bag for loading the camera, but you won't worry a bit about sand and dust, and you'll get some photos with a style that works very well with Burning Man.

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    10
    Quote Originally Posted by chuck94022 View Post
    If you are considering a Holga, then clearly medium format resolution is not the driving principle behind your decision. Not to be said on this forum, but methinks you should GoPro and be there.

    But if that doesn't cut it, I'd hack together a very simple pinhole camera and expose on 4x5 sheet, or cut sections of 120 or 35mm roll film. You'll need a dark bag for loading the camera, but you won't worry a bit about sand and dust, and you'll get some photos with a style that works very well with Burning Man.
    I'm not really looking at a Holga, and don't think anyone else was.

    But the point about a simple pinhole camera is a cool idea. Hmmm....should be easy enough to get one of those guides and try and build my own and test it in 2 weeks. Maybe...

  9. #19
    clayne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    San Francisco, CA | Kuching, MY | Jakarta, ID
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,838
    Images
    57
    A pinhole exposure of the actual burning sounds like a cool idea. I wonder if its already been done. If it hasn't I declare immediate claim to copyright and will license at 100,000USD per similar exposure. ;-)
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  10. #20
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,243
    Images
    60
    Farley Mowat used a Kodak Medalist for his work in the Canadian Arctic.

    With that in mind, I wonder if one of the Fuji rangefinders might be worth considering.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin