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  1. #21
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by clayne View Post
    A pinhole exposure of the actual burning sounds like a cool idea. I wonder if its already been done. If it hasn't I declare immediate claim to copyright and will license at 100,000USD per similar exposure. ;-)


    Too late. Somebody here in Australia associated with Down To Earth (organisers of ConFest) has made a pinhole exposure of the Burning Man effigy going up. Also the Mud Slide. I'm scouring their website and two others at the moment, but given he is a dyed-in-the-dreadlocks greenie who doesn't use digital, it's quite possible he hasn't put it up on the web.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  2. #22

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    I see pictures of Burning Man as more of a photojournalistic style than incredibly detailed beautiful MF or even LF pictures. I think a 35mm Nikonos would do the trick!

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Etr420 View Post
    More seriously, though, could you do something with a strong, clear ziploc plastic bag somehow glued to the rim of a UV filter? I think it was once possible to buy these.
    I think this is the best idea posted so far. My inclination would be to use silicon for the glue, but some experimentation to see what forms a good bond would be in order. You could take a few spares for when the ziploc bag gets damaged.

    Even with 645 format, 120 film takes quite a bit of changing, which seems like the weak link in terms of dust getting in. All things considered, I think I'd be looking more at 35mm in your position, maybe with an EOS body that can function as a p&s---it'll take your Canon lenses, you don't need access to anything but the shutter button, and you can change film *fast* with the ones that auto-load. They're also cheap enough that you could treat the body as a disposable---I once got a Rebel X for six dollars, and I currently see some older EOS bodies as low as eight bucks at KEH.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  4. #24
    PDH
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Farley Mowat used a Kodak Medalist for his work in the Canadian Arctic.

    With that in mind, I wonder if one of the Fuji rangefinders might be worth considering.
    I also think a Medalist is a good thought, used by the Navy in WWII until the 60s. I have used a few over the years, very strong, with some duct tape easy to make dust resitatant, but you would need need to find one converted to 120. Very sharp lens.

  5. #25
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by edcculus View Post
    I see pictures of Burning Man as more of a photojournalistic style than incredibly detailed beautiful MF or even LF pictures. I think a 35mm Nikonos would do the trick!
    Although 35mm is suited to the task, the gauntlet is thrown out for somebody to step up - even past 4x5 - to 8x10...

    Not at all for the resolution.

    But to eliminate the problem of dust.

    For you see, the bigger the film, the less the dust particles will impact the image.

  6. #26

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    Something like this?
    http://www.shoebuy.com/aquapac-slr-camera-case/475355/1006955?cm_mmc=googleproductads_pla-_-none-_-none-_-{keyword}

    There are less expensive flexible bags with a protective lens for your lens.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  7. #27

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    Your biggest problem will be dust and clay particles. A Pentax 6x7 is plenty rugged, but handholdable only at moderately high shutter speeds with normal or wide-angle lenses. But the curtain shutter plus mirror will get any dust pretty well dispersed inside the camera. The same would be true to an equal degree for most med format cameras. So you need to take extra precautions when either changing lenses or film, to prevent dust from getting inside. You'll want a soft dishcloth sized microfiber cloth and mist bottle to wipe your camera down before opening it, preferable a distance from all the ruckus, mabye inside a disposable plastic trashcan liner, or at least upon a clean elevated surface. Hard to do under such circumstances - but if you're happen to especially enjoy spotting images afterwards, this event should be heaven. Sand and grit can obviously mechanically affect your lens too. Might want a clear filter over the lens unless it's a clunker you don't
    really care about. But I'd disagree about Bill's comment about larger formats and dust - the more film area, the more electrostatic surface
    you have to attract dust, esp if you pull a darkslide.... such things need to be coated with antistatic sprays prior to the trip; and in desert
    conditions I've sometimes even taken along a length of speaker wire with a tiny alligator clip at one end and a nail at the other, in order to
    ground metal cameras (it actually helps when working from a tripod)... motor winders are about the worst thing I can think of for shooting film in the desert per static attraction to film .... so even when manually advancing film, don't do it too rapidly. And with a big rowdy crowd,
    you have to consider not just physical damage to your equip but potential theft.... in other words, don't take your best gear if you have
    another option.

  8. #28

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    If it was me going there I would take my Pentax 90WR. It is only 35mm but it is waterproof down to 15 feet. And it only cost me one loonie so if the dust destroys it , the heat gets to it or some one thinks they need it more than me, no real loss. Thrift shops have them or some thing similiar time to time.

  9. #29

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    Interesting, hadn't considered electrostatic charge pulling in dust. The other problem with the dust is it's very abrasive, so a clear/UV filter is very, very recommended for your lens. Otherwise when you wipe it off it'll make lots of wonderful, tiny scratches.

    I will say, for being so huge, you generally don't have to worry about a lot of theft at Burning Man. Yes, some does go on, but often it's someone 'borrowing' a bike or thinking it's their bike. Unfortunately there is sometimes worse, but it's not all that common.

  10. #30
    ROL
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    Australians have been there and described is as "full scale debauchery".
    That reminds me of the Woody Allen quote answering the question, did he think sex was dirty? Only if done correctly.


    OP – as a 10 year burner who as part of his job is trained to solve all manner of other burner's problems (and tag cameras), I have seen all manner of photographic tool used succesfully, and artistically, from D to LF. Silver prints are processed on the playa and I have seen collodion done right on the Esplanade. A lot of people there, despite their outward appearance, have money to burn. I once saw a guy load his Mamiya 7II in a whiteout dust storm (). He didn't care. That's the crux of the issue, if you don't particularly care about the life of your tools you can use whatever floats your artistic boat. I suppose film cameras, cleaned afterwards, fare better than D, in that regard. Taping doesn't keep the wind driven loess out (well, more or less ). Sealed, underwater housings work well, if left unopened. But if/when you decide to reload, there WILL be dust in the air, and it WILL get into your camera, unless it has rained enough to wet the playa completely, and for but a few hours afterward. Waterproof D P&S also work well. If it were me, and it's not, since photography ain't my thing while I'm out there, I'd take take my GoPro, or find a cheap now out of date older model, which is about as non complicated a (sealed) P&S as you can get, shooting video and still. But, if I were jonesing for 120, as you apparently are, why not just use a Holga? Tape it and toss it. It's all be done before, anyway – including the debauchery. )º(
    Last edited by ROL; 07-31-2013 at 07:15 PM. Click to view previous post history.

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