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  1. #11
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sigurdur View Post
    I think I'm in love. Just got my first roll of Portra 400 developed and I am pleasantly surprised. No empty frames!

    I was wondering if anyone has any experience with this lens, as I read somewhere that it was a "budget" lens. I like it a lot but I don't haven't used the 80mm 2.8 (yet).

    Greetings!
    Is yours the chrome version or the black version.

    Either way, I think Graham Patterson might be interested in communicating with you.

    The entries in his Mamiya TLR System summary for either version of the lens make it clear that they are rare and there isn't much information on them.

    If you haven't already reviewed his wonderful resource, you should!

    http://www.gapatterson.com/grahamp
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by tessar View Post
    What I've found (and an art prof agrees) is that the right-to-left viewfinder reversal can actually improve composition because you're looking INTO the camera at an unfamiliar image on a flat surface instead of looking THROUGH the camera at the subject unchanged from how you see it with the naked eye. You tend to see what you're shooting in terms of angles of lines, masses of light and dark, etc.
    Yup,,, for me I'm sure that's part of the reason I did better with it. On the other hand, it really didn't take all that long to get totally comfortable with that, and the little parallax pointer.

  3. #13

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    I have never understood why the 80mm f3.7 was introduced. I have a few theories - import controls, shortage of shutters, or just trying to make the basic camera cheaper - but nothing concrete. Apart from some quirks with the Copal shutter, it should do what you need. I have heard nothing against it optically. I don't have the lens design to hand, but I would expect something like a tessar formula. A bit soft at full bore, but improving quickly to f8. I'd be curious as to the weight of the unit. The Seiko shuttered 80 f2.8 comes in around 310g. If this is significantly lighter it should make for a very portable basic camera on a C220. Maybe they were going after YashicaMats?

    Graham
    I feel, therefore I photograph.

  4. #14
    David Brown's Avatar
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    I have a C220 that came with the f3.7 lens. I've never had the need to "upgrade" to another 80mm. I did all of my wedding business back in the 1970s with that lens and a 135mm.

    It is my understanding that this was a "kit" lens (for lack of a better word) that Mamiya marketed with the C220 to make the camera an entry level model. That is the only thing "budget" about it - the retail cost, not the quality. (IMHO)

    One thing that is a bit odd, however (and it may have been a way of cutting cost, but I don't see how): since the C220 does not auto-cock the shutter when one advances the film, Mamiya did not see it was necessary to put the required mechanism on the F3.7 lens. Fine. However, the cocking lever is on the opposite side of the lens from all the other lenses that go on the camera. It takes some getting used to if you have several lenses (I have 6 of the 7 available focal lengths) and use them all.
    David
    Taking pictures is easy. Making photographs is hard.

    http://www.behance.net/silverdarkroom
    http://silverdarkroom.wordpress.com

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by tessar View Post
    What I've found (and an art prof agrees) is that the right-to-left viewfinder reversal can actually improve composition because you're looking INTO the camera at an unfamiliar image on a flat surface instead of looking THROUGH the camera at the subject unchanged from how you see it with the naked eye. You tend to see what you're shooting in terms of angles of lines, masses of light and dark, etc.
    Upside-down and backwards is even better.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by David Brown View Post
    I have a C220 that came with the f3.7 lens. I've never had the need to "upgrade" to another 80mm. I did all of my wedding business back in the 1970s with that lens and a 135mm.

    It is my understanding that this was a "kit" lens (for lack of a better word) that Mamiya marketed with the C220 to make the camera an entry level model. That is the only thing "budget" about it - the retail cost, not the quality. (IMHO)

    One thing that is a bit odd, however (and it may have been a way of cutting cost, but I don't see how): since the C220 does not auto- @#!*% the shutter when one advances the film, Mamiya did not see it was necessary to put the required mechanism on the F3.7 lens. Fine. However, the cocking lever is on the opposite side of the lens from all the other lenses that go on the camera. It takes some getting used to if you have several lenses (I have 6 of the 7 available focal lengths) and use them all.
    At f:3.7, it could even be a triplet - a type which can be very good. The Rodenstock Geronar LF lens is a triplet, multicoated, and damn good.

  7. #17

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    I just weighed the lens: 219g. It is the black version.
    Thanks for pointing me to Graham's website, it's a fantastic resource.

    I will probably get another lens for the camera, when I have gotten to know this one better. Any recommendations? Most of the lenses seem to be rather inexpensive on ebay.

  8. #18

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    So about 100g (4oz) lighter. As for other lenses, the 180mm Super is good, the 135mm can be useful. At the wider end the 65mm maybe too close to the 80mm. The 55mm can be variable, but that is pretty wide for 6x6. The 105mm is a nice long standard, but close to the 80mm. The 250mm is probably equaled by enlarging the 180mm Super, and that lens is a stop faster.

    it sounds like the C220 with the 80mm f3.7 is a nice light unit - don't be in too much rush to add extra weight and choice 8-)
    I feel, therefore I photograph.

  9. #19

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    To be sure, E. von Hoegh, I also shoot large format!

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