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  1. #1

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    Long shutter times on Hassleblad 80mm/2.8 CF

    I've noticed, after attempting to do some zone system calibration, that the shutter times on my 80 CF seem to be long by 25-50%.

    What's the likelihood that the faster times are also off? Is there anything I can do, or is a CLA the only option.

    If I need a CLA, is there a relatively inexpensive place to get it done? I only paid $250 for it as it's got some coating marks and I can't afford the $200 to have it done by David Odess.

  2. #2
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by feilb View Post
    I only paid $250 for it as it's got some coating marks and I can't afford the $200 to have it done by David Odess.
    Do your exposure index calibration using the shutter speeds you normally would use for regular shooting. Calibrate your system to your shutter, rather than the other way around. Use the $200 for film and paper.

  3. #3
    jscott's Avatar
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    You'll get what you pay for a CLA, especially with the few people who are factory trained. I've done business with Odess and he's worth every penny. I would be afraid that a cheaper CLA might involve squirting in some lighter fluid and hoping for the best, rather than disassembly and proper cleaning, which clearly takes a lot of time and expertise.

    Otherwise, measure your shutter speeds and use a "cheat sheet" of actual shutter speeds. There are instructions on the web to make a shutter speed tester using parts from RadioShack, for $10 or so. Mine works fine and then I attach the cheat sheet to the camera and just use those numbers.

  4. #4
    Rolfe Tessem's Avatar
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    David Odess is your man.

  5. #5

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    One of these days I'm going to get my hands on a junk Hasselblad lens and go down in the shutter and look into this matter. I've already learned how to get TO the shutter, but no IN it. I don't pay for camera repairs.

  6. #6
    vpwphoto's Avatar
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    This guy is good to. Has done work for NASA with some of their early DSLR calibrations. Really surprised with his knowledge from Leica's to Blad, to the electronic wondercameras.
    https://plus.google.com/110676640124...ut?gl=us&hl=en

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by jscott View Post
    You'll get what you pay for a CLA, especially with the few people who are factory trained. I've done business with Odess and he's worth every penny. I would be afraid that a cheaper CLA might involve squirting in some lighter fluid and hoping for the best, rather than disassembly and proper cleaning, which clearly takes a lot of time and expertise.

    Otherwise, measure your shutter speeds and use a "cheat sheet" of actual shutter speeds. There are instructions on the web to make a shutter speed tester using parts from RadioShack, for $10 or so. Mine works fine and then I attach the cheat sheet to the camera and just use those numbers.
    The trouble here is this - will the speeds remain stable, and will they be consistent? If 1/250 is actually 1/200, no biggie. But if it continues to drift towards longer and longer times, or is erratic, forget any kind of close control over exposures.

    Anyone buying old equipment must be aware of the fact that machines need regular maintenance to function as intended.



 

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