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  1. #11
    titrisol's Avatar
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    All time favorite Rollefilex SL66.

    Right now saving to buy a Pentax 645, lighter, well built and has enough features.
    Mama took my APX away.....

  2. #12
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicole McGrade
    Hi everyone, I'd love to know what your favourite MF cameras are and why?

    And is there a MF out that's not quite so big and bulky?
    I'd have to say my favorite is the Kodak Reflex II -- perhaps in part because it was the first adjustable MF camera I owned (after a succession of 127 and 620 simple cameras), but also because a well-working one is a joy to use (nice, bright Fresnel finder, automatic frame counter, and it fits my hands well) and the lens will stand up to anything you can mount on a 'Blad. No, I can't choose from half a dozen focal lengths or change backs in mid-roll, but I don't need multiple focal lengths at all frequently and can generally manage to shoot a dozen shots before changing emulsions.

    And it's not really that bulky; in its everready case it's not significantly larger than my Spotmatic with 50 mm mounted in its everready, plus the shape and waist level finder makes it easier to hold steady at slow speeds than any eye-level camera. And if I need to point it fast, I can always flip open the sports finder, scale focus, and burn through a dozen shots in about one minute with the counter, even on a knob wind. IMO, it'll do anything I could do with a modern Rolleiflex (though the lens is a half stop slower), and I can get another one on eBay a couple times a month for under $50.

    Oh, yeah, the 620 film thing -- if you trim the flanges of a 120 spool as close as possible to the diameter of the film roll itself (heavy nail clippers work very well for this), it fits nicely in the supply well and takes up onto one of the dozen or so 620 spools I keep around. If you process your own film, it's not a problem keeping the old metal spools; if not, you need a cooperative lab, or send the camera somewhere and spend too much to have it converted to 120.

    No, it's probably not suitable for a pro -- but then I haven't got a pro's budget.
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  3. #13
    skander's Avatar
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    For all my travels I use an Iskra. It's a 6x6 russian folder with coupled rangefinder, with all the advantages it induces. On the minus side : the lens is prone to flare but is otherwise really excellent, and it does not have any light meter. I'd like to have a Mamiya 6 or 7, but it's heavier and much more expensive. An Iskra can be had for less than 100$.
    All in all, I'm really satisfied by the Iskra.
    Cheers,
    Skander

  4. #14
    Aggie's Avatar
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    You will have to pry my Mamiya 7II from cold dead hands. It's light (a slightly heavier, but not much pregnant 35mm feel). Great optics, and since you are not that far from Hong Kong, you can get it reasonably there. Tin Chueng is where I got mine at. I paid about 1/3 of the normal USA price for mine. It included full UK warrenty.

    It's not as fast as using a 35mm, and there is no motor drive capability. It has to have each roll individually loaded, which can take time, but I got fast at switching out film.
    Non Digital Diva

  5. #15
    rbarker's Avatar
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    Although I've been tempted a couple of times to venture into the MF RF realm, for what I shoot on MF, I'd have a hard time giving up the flexibility provided by the Hassy. Being able to switch films mid roll with the Hassy's magazines, and the ability to sync flash at anything up to 1/500 in mixed lighting are key factors for me.

    But, if you don't need the things the Hassy provides for what and how you shoot, one of the Mamiya RFs, or the Fuji GA645ZI with autofocus might be a better solution for you.
    [COLOR=SlateGray]"You can't depend on your eyes if your imagination is out of focus." -Mark Twain[/COLOR]

    Ralph Barker
    Rio Rancho, NM

  6. #16
    gr82bart's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicole McGrade
    I do love my Hasselblad but am also looking for something a little smaller and lighter for me. I suppose like a rangefinder.

    I'd appreciate any suggestions on which MF Rangefinders there are - I haven't a clue!
    Smaller and lighter rangefinder than a Hassey in MF. What your looking for is a Holga! And a LOT cheaper too.

    Art.
    Visit my website at www.ArtLiem.com
    or my online portfolios at APUG and ModelMayhem

  7. #17
    Will S's Avatar
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    I have a Fuji GS645 folder which I think is an excellent portable camera for the money. A Plaubel-Makina is probably the best camera made of this type, but they are definitely some moolah. I would buy a Mamiya 7II in a heartbeat if I had the money for the lenses. Of course, a coupled rangefinder folder like a Zeiss Ikon SuperIkonta BX is a great camera.

    I would be interested in hearing recommendations for a MF camera that can be handheld (sometimes) that has removable backs. Is Hasselblad really the only choice available? I've considered the Koni Rapid Omega M for example. Would a Kiev or a Kowa be an acceptable cheaper substitute for a Hassy?

    Thanks,

    Will
    "I am an anarchist." - HCB
    "I wanna be anarchist." - JR

  8. #18
    Ole
    Ole is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Will S
    ...I would be interested in hearing recommendations for a MF camera that can be handheld (sometimes) that has removable backs. Is Hasselblad really the only choice available? ...
    More than 90% of my Bronica shots are handheld. It has removable backs, so I have one back with colour film, one with FP4, and a "backup" back that takes 35mm film for 24x56mm negatives in case I run out of film and have to resort to what I can find in a supermarket or similar (yuk).
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  9. #19
    rbarker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Will S
    . . . Would a Kiev or a Kowa be an acceptable cheaper substitute for a Hassy?
    Is a Zorki a good substitute for a Leica?
    [COLOR=SlateGray]"You can't depend on your eyes if your imagination is out of focus." -Mark Twain[/COLOR]

    Ralph Barker
    Rio Rancho, NM

  10. #20
    Helen B's Avatar
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    Apart from Rolleiflex TLRs, which I think are near-perfect for simple, straightforward photography, I like the Makina 67 and 67W because of their compactness when folded, 6x7 format and their rather nice Nikon lenses. I used a Ross Autorange 820 before I got the 67, and that, or almost any similar 6x9 folder, is also lovable.

    One drawback of all the cameras that I've mentioned is the non-interchangeable lenses. That doesn't bother me much because I tend to stick with one focal length (one perspective/viewpoint) for each of my series. I wouldn't recommend a Makina 67, 670 or 67W to anybody - you either love them enough not to worry about their faults, or you don't.

    Best,
    Helen

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