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  1. #1

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    Hasselblad loading problems

    When I load my Hassy back the first 10% or so of frame #1 gets fogged. I am aligning the arrows when loading. Should I do something different?

    At the end of the roll there is a lot of extra unexposed film. Looks like enough for frame #13. The frames are pretty cenetered for each frame numbers. Any idea why the first frame gets fogged some?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    It is time to replace the seals. If there are still problems after that then send it in for a CLA.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  3. #3

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    I would do an easy test, to weed out some potential problems. I would first put the dark slide inserted in the back, remove it from the camera, load the film in a room without sunshine, very carefully, aligning the arrows and keeping the film taut in the process. Put back the film support in the back carefully, close it. Then wind the film not too fast, counting the number of turns necessary to bring the white indicator up there. If that number is too small (lower than 10 or so...), you have a problem...And use a fresh film, take pictures with it in a single day, no time for film to spring back, and process it quickly.

  4. #4
    selmslie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iluvmycam View Post
    ...At the end of the roll there is a lot of extra unexposed film. Looks like enough for frame #13. ...
    I found this to be the case on the Hasselblad as well as on the Rolleiflex with Kodak and Ilford films. I now go about 1/2 inch beyond lining up with the arrows and get almost the same amount of unexposed film at either end. Even then, the film is still hidden within the paper backing.

    I have never seen any fogged/exposed ends on the film. With both cameras it then takes several turns of the crank to reach frame one. If you are getting the first frame fogged you may need to have the back serviced.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by jk0592 View Post
    I would do an easy test, to weed out some potential problems. I would first put the dark slide inserted in the back, remove it from the camera, load the film in a room without sunshine, very carefully, aligning the arrows and keeping the film taut in the process. Put back the film support in the back carefully, close it. Then wind the film not too fast, counting the number of turns necessary to bring the white indicator up there. If that number is too small (lower than 10 or so...), you have a problem...And use a fresh film, take pictures with it in a single day, no time for film to spring back, and process it quickly.

    I never counted the winds and i wind fast till it stops. It looks like the film should have been advanced maybe 1/8 to 3/16 inch more than it was for #1. Is this problem common with these backs? If it is a problem, can it be repaired economically? I also can try to adjust myself by running arrows on the film past the arrows on the back.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by selmslie View Post
    I found this to be the case on the Hasselblad as well as on the Rolleiflex with Kodak and Ilford films. I now go about 1/2 inch beyond lining up with the arrows and get almost the same amount of unexposed film at either end. Even then, the film is still hidden within the paper backing.

    I have never seen any fogged/exposed ends on the film. With both cameras it then takes several turns of the crank to reach frame one. If you are getting the first frame fogged you may need to have the back serviced.

    I will give it a try. My film is not fogged. I used the wrong words. The end that is giving me the problem has an exposed strip into frame #1. Just like our 35mm would be exposed into the last frame if we shoot to far to the end of our bulk loaded film.

  7. #7

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    I shoot with Foma film and the paper backing is thicker than most. I have to adjust where I line up the arrow. I put it a little before the mark on the back. This gives me 12 frames with out cutting off a frame. You have to test until you find the spot that works for the film you use. I thought I had a problem with the back and I talked to Dave Odess about it and he confirmed it.

  8. #8

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    Well, it sounds like the 'line up' is the problem. I am only using Ilford BW and Kodak color. So hopefully they both line up the same. (Have not shot any BW yet with this cam) What a pain it would be to use lots of films and they would all require differtent line up spots.

  9. #9

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    If you process your own film, and load in the dark, there will not be any exposed film ends. I am guessing that you had the film processed at a commercial lab. They start loading the film in a light tight bag, but remember the roll starts loading from the last frame. When they get to the taped end, they cut the film in the light with the end of the film hanging out of the machine. If they leave a little too much hanging out, the first frame gets exposed.

    You can ask them to be more careful, which helps. You can also wind the film a 1/4~1/2 turn farther (as mentioned ) to mitigate this.

  10. #10

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    Yes, a commercial lab did it.

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