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  1. #191
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kawaiithulhu View Post
    I read through 'bout half of this and didn't see one very important point:

    Digital is forever stuck at the resolution it was captured at. That old 1k picture can never look any better, ever. Saved as JPG, you can never get back the lost part of the lossy compression.

    Film has the advantage here.

    Strange comments. Why would you save it has a JPEG?
    That's not how it's done.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  2. #192
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    You wouldn't. And it's not a limitation unique to digital, as the pushed Tri-X to Pan-X comparison attempts to point out. The exact same thing is true of film. A 35mm shot on TMZ at 3200 for example, will never compare for sharpness, resolution, grain and tonality with a 4x5 on TMX, or 4x5 on anything for that matter. And the 4x5 won't compare to an 8x10, all things being equal (which they seldom are - lenses for smaller formats are often better than those covering larger formats, film flatness suffers in film holders compared to a pressure plate for roll film, but larger formats are much more likely to be shot with a tripod etc.)

    Still, the limitations of the format, film, developer etc. that are used initially become fixed.

  3. #193

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    As i read tjis thread, i am being inspired to pull out some of my old folders. The one thing that bothers me with most of those oldies was the red frame window. I've never had it cause my film to fog but i never took em out in the sun.

    Anyone experiance any trouble n how did you overcome the problem?
    Anyone can make a Digital print, but only a photographer can make a photograph.

  4. #194

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    If there was an economical way to transfer everything I've taken when I had my DSLR onto film I would do it. I've lost too many photos due to drive crashes, CD scratches and the accidental "delete"

  5. #195

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shootar401 View Post
    If there was an economical way to transfer everything I've taken when I had my DSLR onto film I would do it. I've lost too many photos due to drive crashes, CD scratches and the accidental "delete"
    About a dozen years ago I worked with a fellow from Calgary, Canada who was trying to promote the storage of digital images on film. (His business outputs digitally produced cartoons on film for archiving.) There wasn't a lot of interest at the time, but I see by his website that he is still at it. http://www.acmeworksdf.com/digineg.html

  6. #196

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    It's called a film recorder - takes your digital file and laser transfers it onto real film. They've been around quite awhile. Not a cheap service,
    however.

  7. #197
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    My conclusion is that both film and digital archives can be archival in nature, but I'm willing to bet about 95% of all people are not willing to put up with the effort it takes to make it so, let alone the cost. And to do this in perpetuity, with files amassing. After 40 years of shooting digital, will you REALLY go back and check all those old files from way back when? How do you insure compatibility? Will you even care?
    And for the 5% of photographers who persist in the effort of moving old data to new media types (to illustrate, we would have moved data from ST-506 MFM drives to RLL drives to ESDI drives to IDE (PATA) drives then to SATA drives just to keep data accessible from 1985 to 2013...assuming we had a PC that could support each generation's move to new controllers!) if each of us passes on and we have relative(s) inherit our harddrives, the chances are very slim that it will go to the 5% of that generation that cares enough to keep the data transportable... 1:8000 odds simply to get thru 3 generations of 'those that care enough' !

  8. #198
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    Quote Originally Posted by wiltw View Post
    And for the 5% of photographers who persist in the effort of moving old data to new media types (to illustrate, we would have moved data from ST-506 MFM drives to RLL drives to ESDI drives to IDE (PATA) drives then to SATA drives just to keep data accessible from 1985 to 2013...assuming we had a PC that could support each generation's move to new controllers!) if each of us passes on and we have relative(s) inherit our harddrives, the chances are very slim that it will go to the 5% of that generation that cares enough to keep the data transportable... 1:8000 odds simply to get thru 3 generations of 'those that care enough' !
    Basically digital is not archival. The lunar orbital photographs before the first astronaut lunar landing were lost due to lack of computers and tape readers that could read the photographs. Changing data formats, file structures and devices add it the lack of archival survivability for digital data.

    Film and prints are archival if processed correctly and stored correctly. Both can survive surprisingly well even when not stored properly. Prints and negatives thrown in shoe boxes and left in closets, under beds, in attics and in basements are frequently still useable.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  9. #199

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    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    It's called a film recorder - takes your digital file and laser transfers it onto real film. They've been around quite awhile. Not a cheap service,
    however.
    My very first job ever was writing code for the hardware interfaces and user friendly applications for consumer grade versions of these devices. Nowhere near the resolution of commercial laser scan ones (our top res 1024x768), but still pretty neat for the era and a single person could afford one.

  10. #200
    Alan Klein's Avatar
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    It won't really matter. When you die, your wife's next husband will throw all the crap out anyway. Heck, your wife may help him.



 

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