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  1. #11
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick A View Post
    Roll film left in Yashica TLR's for any length of time will pick up a bend.
    I've left the same roll in mine for six months then finished it and had no problems at all. I'm not saying it won't "pick up a bend" but if it does it doesn't seem to cause any problems.

    Same with my M645Pro and its backs with rollers.

  2. #12
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    I tend to have light leak and flakes of dirt problems on film left in vintage 120 folders... So for important shots, if your camera is affected, advance to the next frame before shooting the next important shot if you have done a lot of walking around with it since the last shot. Just to reduce the dust.

  3. #13
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    I have several cameras (35mm and 120 roll film) that I use simultaneously. Sometimes I pick a camera to use again, to find it is still loaded with a film half used I forgot about. Recently I used an old camera after 7 years that was still loaded (24 shots out of 36). I finished the film and hat no problems at all. It even had an old image of my daughter from 7 years ago (nice surprise).
    I also often keep 120 roll film in my old cameras like Agfa Clack and Gevabox (converted into pinhole cameras) for several months without any problems.

    The only thing I'm concerned about is putting a small piece of tape over the red counter window of a 120 roll film camera. If it isn't covered, you might expose the number from the backing paper unto the film in several weeks - or even days in bright sunlight (especially with Holga). The red window isn't always of a decent "red filter quality".
    "Have fun and catch that light beam!"
    Bert from Holland
    my blog: http://thetoadmen.blogspot.nl
    my Linkedin pinhole group: http://tinyurl.com/pinholegroup


    * I'm an analogue enthusiast, trying not to fall into the digital abyss.
    * My favorite cameras: Hasselblad SWC, Leica SL, Leica M7, Russian FKD 18x24, Bronica SQ-B and RF645, Rolleiflex T2, Nikon F4s, Agfa Clack and my pinhole cameras

  4. #14
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Even if it is "decent red filter quality" modern films are panchromatic AND faster than films when those were designed. The backing paper is enough for briefer exposure with most films but I agree, cover with tape. I have a Kodak..heck, forget the model but it's a box camera masquerading as a TLR with a faux viewing lens that's really just a viewfinder. It's a nice condition old class my wife, then g.f. bought me and takes 620 film. It's the only red window camera I have and I use it mainly for novelty interest, but I do tape it over when I put it away with film in it.

  5. #15

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    film flatness is only a problem with 120 (or 220) if you use the lens wide open and have a bend in film path before the frame Some TLRs are ok but lots of pro cameras are not but in normal studio use motor drive and several assistants reloading backs eliminated problems

    film flatness with 35 mm with the Barnack reverse wind can make tank loading with plastic spirals difficult

    the aprocapral story is the two Christmas trees and one bikini film

  6. #16

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    I've encountered no problems with my Pentax 645n, which shoots 16 frames per 120 roll and doesn't feature a straight film path, even leaving the film in the camera for 6 months. Oh, the shame.... Never any problems with 35mm. Of course, YMMV.

  7. #17

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    I've heard of the problem with some old (and I mean old) Hassie backs, some junk brands, and some poorly made rollfilm view camera backs.
    I personally have zero problem with either my Pentax 6x7's or my Horseman roll film backs for the 4x5. Roll film is quite thin and generally made of acetate, so if you advanced the film and didn't take the shot, it could hypothetically expand and buckle a little with humidity if it didn't remain under constant tension. I don't see how reverse rollers could be a problem unless they were just poorly engineered to begin with. That may have been an issue at one time long ago, but more likely the alternative was more a marketing ploy, though a straight path does require less physical depth in the back. What you can do is simply remove your film back and look at bright reflections on the face of the film - preferably something with straight lineslike a bank of fluorescent lights - and see if there is any waviness to the reflection.

  8. #18
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Certain film & temperature and camera combinations are a real setup for the film to pop off the pressure plate. On my Horseman 6x9 back I try to finish the roll. When it sits for a while the first shot after winding will show it.

  9. #19

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    There is a risk with most conventional TLRs, such as all Rollei and Yashica, because they wind from the bottom spool over a roller before the film reaches the pressure plate. The Minolta Autocord winds from the top spool straight to the pressure plate and so the film is bent only after exposure when flatness is not critical.

  10. #20
    L Gebhardt's Avatar
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    I've had issues (both sharpness and loading onto reels) in a Hasselblad back that had film in it for several months, as well as a Mamiya 645Pro back. So I'm now careful to take an extra shot if the film has been sitting for a while in the Hasselblad. Never had an issue in Mamiya 7. From that I draw the conclusion that it's the cameras the bend the film backwards from the way the roll does it that's an issue.

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